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van Dijken, Jan
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Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
van Dijken, J. W. V., Pallesen, U. & Benetti, A. (2019). A randomized controlled evaluation of posterior resin restorations of an altered resin modified glass-ionomer cement with claimed bioactivity. Dental Materials, 35(2), 335-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized controlled evaluation of posterior resin restorations of an altered resin modified glass-ionomer cement with claimed bioactivity
2019 (English)In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the short time clinical behaviour of an altered resin modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), which is claimed to possess bioactivity, in posterior restorations and to compare it intraindividually with a nanofilled resin composite.

METHODS: Totally 78 pairs Class II and 4 pairs Class I restorations were placed in 29 female and 38 male participants with a mean age of 58.3 years (range 37-86). Each patient received at random at least one pair of, as similar as possible, Class II or Class I restorations. In the first cavity of each pair, the modified flowable RMGIC (ACTIVA Bioactive; AB) was placed after phosphoric acid etching of the cavity and without adhesive, according to the instructions of the manufacturer. In the other cavity a well established nanofilled resin composite (CeramX; RC) with a single step self-etch adhesive (Xeno Select) was placed. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated.

RESULTS: 158 restorations, 8 Class I and 150 Class II, were evaluated at the one year recalls. At baseline two failed restorations were observed (2AB), at 6 months six failures (5AB, 1RC) and at 12 months another thirteen failed restorations were observed (12AB, 1RC). This resulted in annual failure rates of 24.1% for the AB and 2.5% for RC (p<0.0001). The main reasons for failure for AB were lost restorations (5), postoperative symptoms (4) and secondary caries (3). Do to the unacceptable very high one-year failure frequency, the clinical study was stopped and no further evaluation will be performed.

SIGNIFICANCE: The use of the AB restorative in Class II cavities, applied as instructed by the manufacturer after a short phosphoric acid pretreatment but without adhesive system, resulted in a non-acceptable very high failure frequency after a one year period. Further studies should be conducted using a bonding agent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
bioactive, clinical, composite resin, glass ionomer, posterior, self etch adhesive
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154178 (URN)10.1016/j.dental.2018.11.027 (DOI)000456070900016 ()30527586 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057611260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-13 Created: 2018-12-13 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Pallesen, U. & Van Dijken, J. (2018). Frakturerede fortænder – behandling med direkte plast (43ed.). Aktuel nordisk odontologi, 43(1), 46-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frakturerede fortænder – behandling med direkte plast
2018 (Danish)In: Aktuel nordisk odontologi, ISSN 1902-3545, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 46-67Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [da]

Kompositte plastmaterialer og adhæsivteknik har gjort det muligt at restaurere frakturerede fortænder med minimal risiko for pul-pale og parodontale komplikationer hos både børn og voksne. Behandlingen kan udføres umiddelbart efter traumet, hvis skaden ikke involverer parodontium eller knogle. Klasse IV fyldninger har kortere holdbarhed end fuldkeramiske – og metalkeramikkroner. Holdbarheden er blevet forbedret med nyere materialer og adhæ-siver. En plastopbygning af en fraktureret tand er mere konservativ for både tandsubstans, pulpa og det omgivende blødtvæv end en krone. Taget i betragtning, at det kan være nødvendigt at omlægge plastfyldningen 2–3 gange for at have samme holdbarhed som en krone, vil de økonomiske konsekvenser for patienten være de samme for begge behandlinger. Heller ikke kroner holder evigt, de må som følge af caries, fraktur af keramik, manglende retention eller af æstetiske grunde også omlægges eller repareres over tid. Klinikere søger ofte efter et mirakelmateriale, men slutresultatet er oftest forbundet med klinikerens håndelag og viden. Alle trin i den restorative procedure er vigtige for en holdbar og æstetisk restaurering.

Abstract [en]

Resin composites and adhesive techniques offer a conservative restoration of crown-fractured teeth with a minimal risk of pulpal and periodontal complications in both children and adults. The restoration can be performed immediately after injury if there is no associated periodontal or supporting bone injury. Class IV resin restorations have a shorter longevity than full ceramic and porcelain fused to metal crowns. The durability of restorations with newer materials and bonding systems has improved. A composite build-up of a fractured tooth is more conservative to the hard tooth-structures, the pulp and the surrounding soft tissue than a crown. Considering that the resin composite build up may need replacement 2–3 times in order to equal the durability of a crown, the economic consequences for the patients over time may be the same for both treatments. However, crowns are also replaced or repaired over the years due to caries, fracture of ceramic, lack of retention or for esthetic reasons. Clinicians often look for a miracle material, but the final result is linked to the clinician's manual skills and knowledge. All steps in the direct restorative procedure are mandatory for a lasting and aesthetic restoration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2018 Edition: 43
Keywords
Tooth fracture, anterior teeth, composite resin, longevity, aesthetics, Tandfraktur, fortænder, direkte plast, holdbarhed, æstetik
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143124 (URN)10.18261/issn.2058-7538-2018-01-05 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
van Dijken, J. W. & Pallesen, U. (2017). Bulk-filled posterior resin restorations based on stress-decreasing resin technology: a randomized, controlled 6-year evaluation. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 125(4), 303-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bulk-filled posterior resin restorations based on stress-decreasing resin technology: a randomized, controlled 6-year evaluation
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This randomized study evaluated a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in posterior restorations and compared it intraindividually with a conventional 2-mm resin composite layering technique over a 6-yr follow-up period. Thirty-eight pairs of Class II restorations and 15 pairs of Class I restorations were placed in 38 adults. In all cavities a single-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V) was applied. In the first cavity of each pair, the flowable resin composite (SDR) was placed, in bulk increments of up to 4 mm. The occlusal part was completed with a layer of nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono). In the second cavity of each pair, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2-mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then annually for a time period of 6 yr. After 6 yr, 72 Class II restorations and 26 Class I restorations could be evaluated. Six failed Class II molar restorations, three in each group, were observed, resulting in a success rate of 93.9% for all restorations and an annual failure rate (AFR) of 1.0% for both groups. The AFR for Class II and Class I restorations in both groups was 1.4% and 0%, respectively. The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture.

Keywords
bulk-fill, clinical, composite resin, posterior, self-etch adhesive
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135994 (URN)10.1111/eos.12351 (DOI)000406976900009 ()28524243 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
van Dijken, J. W. & Pallesen, U. (2017). Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations: A 6-year follow up. Dental Materials, 33(8), 944-953
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations: A 6-year follow up
2017 (English)In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 944-953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up.

METHODS: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA-free self-etch adhesive was used (AdheSe One F). The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 6 years. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated.

RESULTS: Three molar teeth showed mild post-operative sensitivity during 3 weeks for temperature changes and occlusal forces. After 6 years, 134 Class II restorations were evaluated. Twenty-one restorations, 8 cmf-els (11.4%) and 13 ASE-els (20%) failed during the 6 years (p<0.0001). The annual failure rates were 1.9% and 3.3%, respectively. The main reasons for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants.

SIGNIFICANCE: The Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years.

Keywords
Adhesive, Clinical, HEMA, Low shrinkage, Posterior, Resin composite, TEGDMA
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135995 (URN)10.1016/j.dental.2017.04.021 (DOI)000405360900011 ()28545657 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
van Dijken, J. W. V. & Pallesen, U. (2017). Three-year randomized clinical study of a one-step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in class II composite restorations. Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, 19(4), 287-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-year randomized clinical study of a one-step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in class II composite restorations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Adhesive Dentistry, ISSN 1461-5185, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations.

Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 years) received at least two extended Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage composite (Aelite LS) was used for all restorations, which were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years.

Results: 114 Class II restorations were evaluated at three years. Eight restorations, 3 AU and 5 OX, failed during the follow-up, resulting in 94.7% (AU) and 91.2% (OX) success rates (p > 0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.9%, respectively. The main reason for failure was composite fracture.

Conclusion: Class II composite restorations placed with a 1-step universal adhesive showed good short-term efficacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence Publishing Co Inc, 2017
Keywords
adhesive, clinical, posterior, composite, self etch, universal
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141497 (URN)10.3290/j.jad.a38867 (DOI)000413192300002 ()28849796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ramberg, P., Wikén Albertsson, K., Derks, J. & van Dijken, J. (2016). A randomized controlled cross-over study of the effect of alcohol-free chlorhexidine and essential oils on interleukin-1 levels in crevicular fluid. Swedish Dental Journal, 40(2), 143-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized controlled cross-over study of the effect of alcohol-free chlorhexidine and essential oils on interleukin-1 levels in crevicular fluid
2016 (English)In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim of the study was to determine the effect of an alcohol-free chlorhexidine mouth rinse and an essential oils containing mouth rinse on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid in participa nts who continue to perform their regula r mechanical oral hygiene regimes and normal dietary practice.

Twenty adult volunteers (mean age: 59 yea rs) participated in the double-blind randomised controlled cross-over study. Three mouth rinses were used during 16-day periods as an adjuncti­ ve to regular mecha nical oral hygiene:a solution with alcohol-free chlorhexidine (CHX; Paroex®), a solution with essentialoils (EO; Listerine®), and water (negative control). The mouth rinse periods were separated by 3-month washout periods.

At days o (baseline) and 17 (end) of each mouth rinse period, gingiva lcrevicular fluid (GCF)

was collected at different tooth sites and analyzed with ELISA technique for IL-1a,IL-115 and IL-ira leveIs.

No significant correlations between clinical parameters (QHI and GI) and cytokine concentra­ tions were observed, regardless of mouth rinse regimen.The generalized linear modeIs revealed that none of the mouth rinses had a statistically significant impact on IL-1 concentrations in GCF. Large inter-individual variations were observed for the levels of IL-1a, IL-115 and IL-1ra. Also the changes in concentrations between day o and day 17 for the mouthrinses showed Iarge intra-individual  variations.

It can  be concluded that  neither the alcohol-free  chlorhexidine  nor the  mouth  rinse contain­ ing essential oils reduced the levels of IL-ia, IL-115 and IL-ira in GCF

Keywords
Clinical, chlorhexidine, crevicular fluid, cytokines; essential oils, mouth rinse
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125067 (URN)000386982400004 ()
Available from: 2016-09-05 Created: 2016-09-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
van Dijken, J. W. & Pallesen, U. (2016). Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations: a 5-year randomized controlled clinical study. Journal of Dentistry, 51, 29-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations: a 5-year randomized controlled clinical study
2016 (English)In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 51, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 5 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated.

RESULTS: No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At 5-year 183, 68 Class I and 115 Class II, restorations were evaluated. Ten restorations failed (5.5%), all Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramX mono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failure were tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1.3% (p=0.12). For the Class II restorations, the AFR was 1.4% and 2.1%, respectively.

CONCLUSION: The stress decreasing flowable bulk-fill resin composite technique showed good durability during the 5-year follow-up.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The use of a 4mm incremental technique with the flowable bulk-fill resin composite showed during the 5-year follow up slightly better, but not statistical significant, durability compared to the conventional 2mm layering technique in posterior resin composite restorations.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124775 (URN)10.1016/j.jdent.2016.05.008 (DOI)000381583900005 ()27238052 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-24 Created: 2016-08-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
van Dijken, J. W. & Lindberg, A. (2015). A 15-year randomized controlled study of a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite. Dental Materials, 31(9), 1150-1158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 15-year randomized controlled study of a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite
2015 (English)In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1150-1158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the long term effectiveness of a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite in Class II restorations. The material was compared intra-individually with a microhybrid resin composite.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each of 50 patients with at least one pair of two similar sized Class II cavities participated (22 female, 28 male, mean age 43 years, range 18-64). Each participant received in each pair, in a randomized way, one Class II restoration performed with a reduced shrinkage stress resin composite (InTen-S) and the other restoration with a microhybrid resin composite restoration (Point 4). Both restorations were placed with an etch-and-rinse bonding system and an oblique layering technique. A total of 106 restorations, 33 premolar and 73 molars, were placed. The restorations were evaluated blindly each year using modified USPHS criteria. The overall performance of the experimental restorations was tested after intra-individual comparison using the Friedmańs two-way analysis of variance test. The hypothesis was rejected at the 5% level.

RESULTS: At 15 years, 91 restorations were evaluated. The drop out frequency was 15 restorations (5 male, 3 female participants; 2 premolar and 13 molar restorations). Except for 2 participants, who reported slight symptoms during a few weeks after placement, no post-operative sensitivity was observed at the recalls. The overall success rate at 15 years was 77%. Twenty-one non acceptable restorations were observed during the 15 years follow up, 10 InTen-S (21.7%) and 11 Point 4 (24.4%) restorations (p>0.05). Annual failure rates for the resin composites were 1.5% and 1.6%, respectively. The main reasons for failure were secondary caries (8) and resin composite fracture (7). The differences between premolar vs. molar restorations and between restorations in male vs. female participants were not significant. Significant differences were observed between 2-surface vs. 3-surface restorations.

SIGNIFICANCE: During the 15-year follow up, the reduced shrinkage stress resin composite showed a good clinical durability in Class II cavities, but not significantly better than the control microhybrid resin composite. Secondary caries and material fracture were the main reasons of failure.

Keywords
Clinical trial, Composite restoration, Posterior, Resin, Polymerization shrinkage, Stress
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108535 (URN)10.1016/j.dental.2015.06.012 (DOI)000361842900016 ()26205382 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Pallesen, U. & van Dijken, J. W. (2015). A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations. Journal of Dentistry, 43(12), 1547-1558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations
2015 (English)In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 1547-1558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations during 27 years.

METHODS: Thirty participants, 25 female and 5 male (mean age 38.2 yrs, range 25-63), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size. The three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a chemical-cured (Clearfil Posterior) and two visible light-cured resin composites (Adaptic II, Occlusin). A chemical-cured enamel bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) was applied after Ca(OH)2 covering of dentin and enamel etch. Marginal sealing of the restorations was performed after finishing. One operator placed 99 restorations (33 sets). Evaluation was performed with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 2, 3, 10 and 27 years.

RESULTS: Postoperative sensitivity was observed in 5 patients. Three participants with 11 restorations (11%) could not be evaluated at the 27 year recall. Thirty-seven restorations failed (13 AII, 10CP and 14 O). The overall success rate after 27 years was 56.5% (AII 55.2%, CP 63.0%, O 51.7%; p=0.70), with an annual failure rate of 1.6%. The main reason for failure was secondary caries (54.1%), followed by occlusal wear (21.6%) and material fracture (18.9%). Non-acceptable color match was seen in 24 (28.3%) of the restorations (AII 2, CP 16, O 6). Cox regression-analysis showed significant influence of the covariates tooth type, caries risk, and bruxing activity of the participants.

CONCLUSIONS: Class II restorations of the three conventional resin composites showed an acceptable success rate during the 27 year evaluation.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108533 (URN)10.1016/j.jdent.2015.09.003 (DOI)000366459800022 ()26363442 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84945387811 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Pallesen, U. & van Dijken, J. W. (2015). A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations. Dental Materials, 31(10), 1232-1244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations
2015 (English)In: Dental Materials, ISSN 0109-5641, E-ISSN 1879-0097, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 1232-1244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this 30 year randomized controlled study was to evaluate, by intraindividual comparisons, the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations.

METHODS: Each of 30 participants, 21 female and 9 male (mean age 30 years, range 20-43), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size. After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with two chemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-cured enamel bonding agent was applied after etching of the enamel. The chemical-cured resin composites were placed in bulk and the light-cured in increments. One operator placed 99 restorations (33 sets). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 years. Statistical analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test and Cox regression analyses.

RESULTS: After 30 years, 5 participants with 15 restorations (15%) could not be evaluated during the whole evaluation. Seven participants were considered as caries risk and eight participants as having active parafunctional habits. Postoperative sensitivity was observed in 24 teeth. In total 28 restorations, 9 P10, 12 P30 and 7 Miradapt restorations failed during the 30 years. The main reasons for failure were secondary caries (39.2%) and material fracture (35.7%). Sixty-four percent of the secondary caries lesions were found in high caries risk participants and 70% of the material fractures occurred in participants with active parafunctional habits. The overall success rate at 30 years was 63%, with an annual failure rate of 1.1%. 68-81% of the restorations showed non-acceptable color match. No statistical significant difference in survival rate was found between the three resin composites (p=0.45). The variables tooth type, cavity size, age, and gender of the participants did not significantly affect the probability of failure.

SIGNIFICANCE: The three conventional resin composites showed good clinical performance during the 30 year evaluation. The chemical cured resin composites showed better performance than the light-cured composite.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108534 (URN)10.1016/j.dental.2015.08.146 (DOI)000366568000013 ()26321155 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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