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Zmyvalova, Ekaterina Andreyevna
Alternative names
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Zmyvalova, E. A. & Outakoski, H. (2019). The development of Sámi children's right to learn Sámi in the Russian school context. In: Otso Kortekangas, Pigga Keskitalo, Jukka Nyyssönen, Andrej Kotljarchuk, Merja Paksuniemi, and David Sjögren (Ed.), Sámi educational history in a comparative international perspective: (pp. 105-123). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of Sámi children's right to learn Sámi in the Russian school context
2019 (English)In: Sámi educational history in a comparative international perspective / [ed] Otso Kortekangas, Pigga Keskitalo, Jukka Nyyssönen, Andrej Kotljarchuk, Merja Paksuniemi, and David Sjögren, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 105-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we show how the provisions of international law concerning Indigenous children's right to learn their mother tongue in school have evolved over time and how the provisions of the Russian national legislation comply with international law. In the light of this framework, we present the historic trajectory of Sámi education at the Lovozero School, from the end of the 1800s to the organizational and attitudinal breaking point experienced during the school year of 2016–2017. Although the Russian legislation has come to contain the elements of the right in focus, we claim that the realization of this right has been, and still is, problematic. A further analysis indicates a recent negative change of the curricular contents, and of the interest of the Sámi learners to attend the Sámi language lessons. This change coincides with a shift from language-oriented teaching into history and culture-oriented program at the school, as well as with negative changes in the speaker demography.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Sámi, children's rights, Russia, school, mother tongue, legal acts, legislation
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163411 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-24112-4_7 (DOI)978-3-030-24112-4 (ISBN)978-3-030-24111-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-19 Created: 2019-09-19 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Zmyvalova, E. A. (2019). The Place of Indigenous Languages in the Russian System of School Education: A Legal Analysis. The Yearbook of Polar Law, 10(1), 75-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Place of Indigenous Languages in the Russian System of School Education: A Legal Analysis
2019 (English)In: The Yearbook of Polar Law, ISSN 1876-8814, E-ISSN 2211-6427, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 75-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are 47 groups of indigenous peoples in Russia. Many languages of indigenous peoples are at the edge of extinction. From 1995 to 2010 the proportion of indigenous pupils among all indigenous peoples learning their mother tongue decreased by almost half. This article examines the legal regulation of the Russian system of school education and defines what place indigenous languages have in this system. The author comes to the conclusion that realising the right of indigenous children to learn their mother tongue in Russia is complicated by many factors of both legal and non-legal character.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2019
Keywords
indigenous peoples, Russia, school education, mother tongue
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162097 (URN)10.1163/22116427_010010006 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Zmyvalova, E. (2018). Indigenous Peoples of the Russian North and Their Right to Traditional Fishing. International Journal on Minority and Group Rights, 25(1), 51-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Peoples of the Russian North and Their Right to Traditional Fishing
2018 (English)In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights, ISSN 1385-4879, E-ISSN 1571-8115, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 51-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The preservation of the traditional livelihood of the indigenous peoples of the Russian North is one of the State's policy priorities in the Russian Federation. This is declared in such documents as, inter alia, the Development Strategy of the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation and the National Security for the period up to 2020 and the Paper on the Sustainable Development of the Indigenous Small-Numbered Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East of Russia for the period up to 2025. Fishing is one of the basic traditional practices for the indigenous peoples of the Russian North. Despite the legal recognition of the right to traditional fishing of indigenous peoples, the practical realization of this right is complicated. While analysing the current situation, the author attempts to shed some light on the reasons of the problematic realization of this right.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2018
Keywords
indigenous small-numbered peoples, North, Siberia and the Far East of Russia, right to traditional fishing, indigenous culture, effectiveness of the right's realization
National Category
Law (excluding Law and Society)
Research subject
Law
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145645 (URN)10.1163/15718115-02501004 (DOI)000429354800002 ()
Available from: 2018-03-12 Created: 2018-03-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Zmyvalova, E. (2017). The Russian Arctic: Indigenous peoples and industrial development [Review]. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship, 13(2), 132-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Russian Arctic: Indigenous peoples and industrial development
2017 (English)In: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship, ISSN 1177-1801, E-ISSN 1174-1740, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 132-134Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Russian Indigenous peoples, Arctic, industrial development
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140112 (URN)10.1177/1177180117700814 (DOI)000441527200010 ()
Note

Book review: Valery Tishkov (ed.),

Available from: 2017-10-01 Created: 2017-10-01 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Zmyvalova, E. (2016). Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Development: A Monograph [Review]. Arctic Review on Law and Politics, 7(2), 196-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Development: A Monograph
2016 (English)In: Arctic Review on Law and Politics, ISSN 1891-6252, E-ISSN 2387-4562, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 196-198Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2016
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127681 (URN)10.17585/arctic.v7.506 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Zmyvalova, E. A. (2015). Indigenous Children’s Right to Learn Their Mother Tongue at School: Implementation and Realization in Russia. Arctic Review on Law and Politics, 6(2), 151-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Children’s Right to Learn Their Mother Tongue at School: Implementation and Realization in Russia
2015 (English)In: Arctic Review on Law and Politics, ISSN 1891-6252, E-ISSN 2387-4562, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 151-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

According to official statistics, there are decreasing numbers of Nenets people - the largest group of indigenous small-numbered people in Russia - who know their native language. Moreover, it is mostly elderly people who know the language. Even though children learn the Nenets language at school, they do not know it properly. This is especially true in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug in Northwest Russia. In the eight-year period between the population censuses of 2002 and 2010, the number of Nenets speakers in this area decreased by three times. While many factors have contributed to this decline, this article focuses on the legal issues that have impacted the situation, in particular, the inadequate implementation of international commitments that guarantee the right of indigenous children to learn their mother tongue at school into national legislation and the ineffective realization of legal commitments of national legislation concerning this right.

This article examines how sources of law concerning indigenous children’s right to learn their mother tongue are implemented and realized in Russia. The focus is on the Nenets Autonomous Okrug. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Troms: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2015
Keywords
indigenous children’s rights, language, Nenets, education, school, implementation, realization
National Category
Law
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-125002 (URN)10.17585/arctic.v6.117 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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