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Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
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Publications (10 of 239) Show all publications
Saeid, S., Tolvanen, P., Kumar, N., Eränen, K., Peltonen, J., Peurla, M., . . . Salmi, T. (2018). Advanced oxidation process for the removal of ibuprofen from aqueous solution: a non-catalytic and catalytic ozonation study in a semi-batch reactor. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 230, 77-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advanced oxidation process for the removal of ibuprofen from aqueous solution: a non-catalytic and catalytic ozonation study in a semi-batch reactor
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2018 (English)In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 230, p. 77-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Concern on the availability of clean and safe fresh water and the quality of recycled wastewater are important issues, which require a suitable technology to restore the water quality. Pharmaceuticals in waste water are not easily degraded by conventional water treatment technology. Advanced oxidation processes have been applied to eliminate traces of these compounds from aquatic environments. This study was focused on the degradation of ibuprofen (IBU) in aqueous solutions by catalytic and non-catalytic ozonation. Preliminary experiments were conducted to optimize the ozone concentration in water and to investigate other operation parameters. The operation parameters were: temperature, stirring rate, gas flow rate, pH, and use of Spinchem stirrer to reach higher concentrations of dissolved ozone. In general, the initial concentration of IBU was 10 mg/L, and about 93% of IBU was degraded after 4 h of ozonation under optimal conditions. Additional experiments were carried out to investigate the benefit of applying a solid catalyst. H-Beta and Fe-H-Beta type catalysts were immobilized in the Spinchem rotating bed device. The catalytic experiments illustrated a significant improvement in the degradation rate of IBU. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption- desorption, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and FTIR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Ibuprofen, Ozone, Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), Heterogeneous catalyst
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145680 (URN)10.1016/j.apcatb.2018.02.021 (DOI)000429500100009 ()
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Khokarale, S. G., Anugwom, I., Maki-Arvela, P., Virtanen, P. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). CHAPTER 5 Switchable Polarity Liquids. In: Polymerized Ionic Liquids: (pp. 143-179). The Royal Society of Chemistry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CHAPTER 5 Switchable Polarity Liquids
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2018 (English)In: Polymerized Ionic Liquids, The Royal Society of Chemistry , 2018, p. 143-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140745 (URN)10.1039/9781788010535-00143 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Konwar, L. J., Samikannu, A., Mäki-Arvela, P. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Efficient C-C coupling of bio-based furanics and carbonyl compounds to liquid hydrocarbon precursors over lignosulfonate derived acidic carbocatalysts. Catalysis Science & Technology, 8(9), 2449-2459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient C-C coupling of bio-based furanics and carbonyl compounds to liquid hydrocarbon precursors over lignosulfonate derived acidic carbocatalysts
2018 (English)In: Catalysis Science & Technology, ISSN 2044-4753, E-ISSN 2044-4761, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 2449-2459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper demonstrates the catalytic potential of novel Na-lignosulfonate (LS) derived meso/macroporous solid protonic acids upon C–C coupling of bio-based furanics and carbonyl compounds. The materials demonstrated catalytic activity for solventless hydroxyalkylation/alkylation (HAA) of 2-methylfuran with furfural, acetone, butanal, cyclohexanone, levulinic acid and α-angelica lactone under mild reaction conditions (50–60 °C) producing branched-chain C12–C16 hydrocarbon precursors in yields approaching 96%. Moreover, the carbon materials exhibiting high total acidity (6–6.4 mmol g−1) outperformed sulfonic acid resins (Amberlyst®70, Amberlite®IR120 and LS resin), zeolites and liquid acids (p-toluenesulfonic acid, acetic acid and phenol). In fact, the most active carbocatalyst (60LS40PS350H+) exhibited the same turnover frequency as p-toluenesulfonic acid (186 h−1) upon furfural conversion but with an improved HAA product yield (up to 88%) and reusability, maintaining 98% of its original activity up to seven reaction cycles. The observed catalytic activity and operational stability of the LS derived acidic carbocatalysts were attributed to the strongly Brønsted acidic –SO3H groups covalently incorporated into their structural carbon framework and the promotional effects of hydrophilic surface functional groups (–COOH and –OH) favoring adsorption of oxygenated reactant molecules.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146304 (URN)10.1039/C7CY02601C (DOI)000433163900021 ()
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Aguilera, A. F., Tolvanen, P., Heredia, S., Muñoz, M. G., Samson, T., Oger, A., . . . Salmi, T. (2018). Epoxidation of fatty acids and vegetable oils assisted by microwaves catalyzed by a cation exchange resin. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 57(11), 3876-3886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epoxidation of fatty acids and vegetable oils assisted by microwaves catalyzed by a cation exchange resin
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2018 (English)In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 3876-3886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epoxidation of oleic acid and cottonseed oil was conducted in a semibatch reactor with in-situ-formed percarboxylic acid (peracetic acid or perpropionic acid), using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent and carboxylic acid (acetic acid or propionic acid) as oxygen carriers. Amberlite IR-120 was implemented as the catalyst. The system was comprised of a loop reactor, where the mixture was pumped through a single-mode cavity in which microwave irradiation was introduced. A heat exchanger was integrated into the system to replace microwave heating, to compare the results obtained via microwave heating versus conventional heating. The catalyst loading effect was studied, as well as the influence of microwave irradiation and the implementation of the SpinChem rotating bed reactor (RBR), in hopes of decreasing the influence of the internal mass transfer. The application of microwave irradiation results in an improvement of the reaction yield in the absence of a catalyst.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
Keywords
soybean oil, reaction system, reactor system, peracetic acid, oleic acid, seed oil, kinetics, polyols
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145683 (URN)10.1021/acs.iecr.7b05293 (DOI)000428356100008 ()
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Khokarale, S. G. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Hydrogen sulfide gas capture by organic superbase 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene through salt formation: salt synthesis, characterization and application for CO2 capture. RSC Advances, 8(33), 18531-18541
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogen sulfide gas capture by organic superbase 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene through salt formation: salt synthesis, characterization and application for CO2 capture
2018 (English)In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 33, p. 18531-18541Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a toxic and environment polluting gas like other acid gases and hence its capture and sequestration is equally important before release into the atmosphere. In this regard, solvent-based processes involving aqueous tertiary amine systems were extensively studied and used. Herein, in line with an analogous pathway, we report capture of H2S gas in the form of its salt with an organic superbase such as 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) and the obtained salt was thoroughly studied. Spectroscopic analyses such as NMR and FTIR analyses confirmed that the H2S molecule formed an ionic solid adduct with DBU through protonation of its sp2-hybridized N atom. The stability of formed [DBUH][SH] salt in aqueous solution as well as under thermal treatment was also studied and monitored by NMR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. In aqueous medium, compared to DBU, the [DBUH][SH] salt exhibited long term stability without decomposition whereas under thermal treatment both DBU and its salt with H2S turned out to be thermally unstable where salt showed a volatile nature like a sublimized solid. Dissolution feasibility of [DBUH][SH] salt was also compared with DBU in polar as well as non-polar solvents and even though the [DBUH][SH] salt had an ionic nature, like DBU, it was also found soluble in various polar and non-polar solvents. Considering the stability of [DBUH][SH] salt in aqueous medium, its aqueous solution was further explored as a solvent media for CO2 capture where the influence of process parameters such as the influence of concentration of water in the solvent and CO2 flow rate was studied. Most importantly, here we demonstrated the synthesis of [DBUH][SH] salt for easy capture of H2S gas following reaction with DBU under ambient reaction conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147956 (URN)10.1039/C8RA02993H (DOI)000433428300042000433428300042 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04090Bio4EnergyThe Kempe FoundationsKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Verziu, M., Tirsoaga, A., Cojocaru, B., Bucur, C., Tudora, B., Richel, A., . . . Mikkola, J. P. (2018). Hydrogenolysis of lignin over Ru-based catalysts: the role of the ruthenium in a lignin fragmentation process. Molecular Catalysis, 450, 65-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrogenolysis of lignin over Ru-based catalysts: the role of the ruthenium in a lignin fragmentation process
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2018 (English)In: Molecular Catalysis, ISSN 2468-8231, Vol. 450, p. 65-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The catalytic performances of two different classes of catalysts containing nickel or/and ruthenium as the active sites were studied in the depolymerisation of lignin isolated from Miscanthus×giganteus. The catalysts were prepared either by coprecipitation (ie, (RuNiMgAlO)x, (RuNiAlO)x, (NiAlO)x, (NiMgAlO)x) or by wet impregnation (ie, Ru/Al2O3) and characterized by nitrogen physisorption (BET), XRD, XPS, NH3-TPD, Raman and H2-TPR techniques. The experimental results indicate that the presence of ruthenium led to dimers as dominant products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
lignin, hydrogenolysis, heterogeneous catalysts, Ru-based catalysts
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146057 (URN)10.1016/j.mcat.2018.03.004 (DOI)000431158400008 ()
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shukla, S. K. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Intermolecular interactions upon carbon dioxide capture in deep-eutectic solvents. Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, 20, 24591-24601
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intermolecular interactions upon carbon dioxide capture in deep-eutectic solvents
2018 (English)In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 20, p. 24591-24601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Herein we report the CO2 uptake in potential deep-eutectic solvents (DESs) formed between hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) such as monoethanolammonium chloride ([MEA·Cl]), 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([HMIM·Cl]) and tetra-n-butylammonium bromide ([TBAB]) and hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) like ethylenediamine ([EDA]), diethylenetriamine ([DETA]), tetraethylenepentamine ([TEPA]), pentaethylenehexamine ([PEHA]), 3-amino-1-propanol ([AP]) and aminomethoxypropanol ([AMP]) and analyzed the outcome in terms of the specific polarity parameters. Among various combinations of HBAs and HBDs, [MEA·Cl][EDA]-, [MEA·Cl][AP]-, [HMIM·Cl][EDA]- and [HMIM·Cl][AP] showed excellent CO2 uptake which was further improved upon increasing the mole ratio of HBA : HBD from 1 : 1 to 1 : 4. The lowest CO2 uptake in [MEA·Cl][PEHA] (12.7 wt%) and [HMIM·Cl][PEHA] (8.4 wt%) despite the highest basicity of [PEHA] infers that the basicity is not the sole criteria for guiding the CO2 uptake but, in reality, CO2 capture in a DES relies on the interplay of H-bonding interactions between each HBA and HBD. The role of HBAs in guiding CO2 uptake was more prominent with weak HBDs such as [TEPA] and [PEHA]. The speciation of absorbed CO2 into carbamate, carbonate, and bicarbonate was favorable in DES characterized by comparable hydrogen bond donor acidity (α) and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity (β) values, whereas the conversion of carbamate to carbonate/bicarbonate was observed to depend on α. The addition of water in DES resulted in lower CO2 uptake due to the decreased basicity (β).

National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151739 (URN)10.1039/C8CP03724H (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Gavilà, L., Constantí, M., Medina, F., Pezoa-Conte, R., Anugwom, I. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Lactic acid production from renewable feedstock: fractionation, hydrolysis, and fermentation. Advanced Sustainable Systems, 2(3), Article ID 1700185.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lactic acid production from renewable feedstock: fractionation, hydrolysis, and fermentation
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 1700185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, an integrated fractionation with a switchable ionic liquid (SIL), pulp hydrolysis, and lactic acid fermentation is carried out. For this, SO2-swithced SIL is used for fractionation of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) bagasse and giant cane (Arundo donax, AD). SIL is able to extract ≈2/3 of lignin when relatively large wood chips (≈4 mm) are used without any mechanical agitation and just 1 h of treatment time for AD. Furthermore, SIL reuse is successfully demonstrated for four runs. Subsequently, the produced pulps are hydrolyzed within 15 min in a microwave reactor, producing a glucose rich hydrolysates. Finally, these hydrolysates are used as a carbohydrate source for Lactobacillus delbrueckii fermentation, which selectively transform all glucose present into optically pure D-lactic acid. Hence, the whole chain for lactic acid production from biomass is successfully demonstrated.

Keywords
anaerobic fermentation, hydrothermal hydrolysis, ionic liquids, lactic acid, lignocellulosic biomass
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144658 (URN)10.1002/adsu.201700185 (DOI)000427112800009 ()
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Konwar, L. J., Samikannu, A., Mäki-Arvela, P., Boström, D. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Lignosulfonate-based macro/mesoporous solid protonic acids for acetalization of glycerol to bio-additives. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 220, 314-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lignosulfonate-based macro/mesoporous solid protonic acids for acetalization of glycerol to bio-additives
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2018 (English)In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 220, p. 314-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The enclosed paper introduces a novel, scalable and environmentally benign process for making strongly acidic solid meso/macroporous carbon catalysts from Na-lignosulfonate (LS), a byproduct from sulfite pulping. Ice-templated LS was converted to strongly acidic macro/mesoporous solid protonic acids via mild pyrolysis (350–450 °C) and ion/H+ exchanging technique. The synthesized materials were extensively characterized by FT-IR, Raman, XRD, XPS, TGA, FE-SEM, TEM and N2-physisorption methods. These LS derived materials exhibited a macro/mesoporous and highly functionalized heteroatom doped (O, S) carbon structure with large amounts of surface OH, COOH and SO3H groups similar to the sulfonated carbon materials. Further, these carbon materials showed excellent potential as solid acid catalysts upon acetalization of glycerol with various bio-based aldehydes and ketones (acetone, methyl levulinate and furfural), easily outperforming the commercial acid exchange resins (Amberlite® IR120 and Amberlyst® 70). Most importantly, the optimum LS catalyst exhibiting a large specific surface area demonstrated exceptional potential for continuous solketal production (liquid phase atmospheric pressure operation) maintaining its activity (glycerol conversion ≥ 91%) and structural features even after 90 h time on stream.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Solid sulfonic acids, Glycerol acetalization, Bio-additives, Solketal, Lignosulfonate
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139656 (URN)10.1016/j.apcatb.2017.08.061 (DOI)000412957200030 ()
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Samikannu, A., Konwar, L. J., Mäki-Arvela, P. & Mikkola, J.-P. (2018). Renewable N-doped active carbons as efficient catalysts for direct synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 241, 41-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Renewable N-doped active carbons as efficient catalysts for direct synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2
2018 (English)In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 241, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the spirit of green chemistry and greenhouse gas mitigation, we explore herein the chemical utilization of CO2 upon synthesis of cyclic carbonates over N-doped activated carbons. The N-doped carbocatalysts were obtained from inexpensive N-rich bio-waste precursors and characterized by standard techniques (N2 physisorption, chemisorption, XPS, SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR and Micro-Raman spectroscopy). The materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity for direct carbonation of epoxides with CO2 to cyclic carbonates (yields upto 99%) under solvent free, moderate temperature (100–150 °C) and low CO2 pressure (5–50 bar) conditions. The observed catalytic activity of the N-doped carbocatalysts was attributed to the Lewis basic sites originating from pyridinic, pyridonic, and quaternary N-sites capable of activating the CO2 molecule. While control experiments with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) or commercial activated carbon, failed to produce cyclic carbonates due to lack of active (basic) sites. In terms of the catalytic performance, the N-doped carbocatalysts presenting a high porosity (634–1316 m2/g) and high levels of pyridinic (33%) and quaternary N-doping (30%), (i.e. CA500 and MA500), exhibited the highest activity and selectivity (TOF, conversion and cyclic carbonate yields upto 99% in 5–15 h). Most importantly, these materials demonstrated good operational stability and reusability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
CO2 utilization, N-doped carbons, cyclic carbonates, metal free catalysis
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151687 (URN)10.1016/j.apcatb.2018.09.019 (DOI)2-s2.0-85053212900 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
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