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Hudson, Alison
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Hudson, A. (2009). Methodologies for researching the relationship between academic development and learning technologies.: Underpinning Academic Practice with Research and Scholarship.. In: (Accepted) Staff and Educational Development Conference, SEDA, May, 2009..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methodologies for researching the relationship between academic development and learning technologies.: Underpinning Academic Practice with Research and Scholarship.
2009 (English)In: (Accepted) Staff and Educational Development Conference, SEDA, May, 2009., 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Key issues to be addressed are: the practices and the position of ‘educational developers’ and ‘learning technologists’ in UK higher education. 

The session draws on a study which explores professional paths and relationships and respective approaches to supporting teaching and learning including the use of information and communication technology within what is seen as a changing university context. 

The study suggests that the balance of power, in terms of the value placed on economic, cultural and social capital in the ‘knowledge economy’ (Blunkett, 2000), is shifting from concentrating on teaching, learning and scholarship, towards notions of ‘innovation’ influenced by the use of new technologies, business imperatives and new forms of management. This shift in the UK is underpinned by successive periods of reform and restructuring of the university, where both ‘new’ professionals and ‘old’ professionals are subject to social and political pressures initiated by new forms of central governance and a growing bureaucracy of change (Clark, 1998; Gibbons, 1998; Deem, 2001, 2006). 

The theoretical framework and the empirical base of the study will be presented as one approach taken to exploring complex fields and sub-fields, as the social arenas in which capital is accumulated and where struggles for power and resources take place (Bourdieu and Wacquant, 1992). 

The paper raises questions about current conditions shaping professional paths and argues that academic development (which includes the use of new technologies) requires both a creative and critical approach to scholarship and research to create the most appropriate and creative conditions for teaching and learning in a complex climate of change. It is hoped that this will form the basis for a lively discussion about the field and methodologies for researching the field.

Keywords
Higher Education, Research Methodologies, Academic Development, Scholarship.
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19005 (URN)
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hudson, A. (2009). New professionals and new technologies in new higher education?: Conceptualising struggles in the field. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå School of Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New professionals and new technologies in new higher education?: Conceptualising struggles in the field
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores the practices and positionings of two groupings of professionals in UK higher education, ‘educational developers’ and ‘learning technologists’. It investigates the emergence of the groupings, and their professional paths and respective approaches to supporting teaching and learning. It also explores the use of information and communication technology within what is seen as a changing university context. These two ‘new’ professional groupings are most associated with a shift of focus in universities from teaching towards learning, heightened emphasis on the quality of teaching and learning, the increased impact of learning technologies on practice, organisational transformation, and increased numbers of students attending universities, i.e. massification of higher education world-wide. Thus, equivalent exemplars and variations can also be found throughout Europe and in other international settings.

The social structure and practices that govern the two groupings have been analysed by means of a wide range of theories, concepts and methods which include Bourdieu’s (1988) concepts of habitus, field, position and capital, Boyer’s (1990) ideas about new scholarship, Palmer’s (1998) conceptualisation of the university teacher and Clark’s (2003) identification of the entrepreneurial university. The work of others, in particular Schön (1967) and Ball (2003), also provides an insight into the powerful relationship between technology, society, education and change.

Thus, the thesis explores fields and sub-fields, as social arenas in which capital is accumulated and where struggles for power and resources take place. The study suggests that both groups occupy a highly politicised position, are affected by the shifting value of social, cultural and economic capital in the constantly changing higher education, are subject to struggle regarding ‘position’ and agency and are susceptible to the demands of new power regimes and technological solutions. It suggests that educational development is a scholarly field of study but has also become a technology responsible for translating institutional policy into practice, while learning technologists have been more politically successful and have had a relatively greater impact on academic practice in university settings. Whilst the relationship and division of work between educational developers and learning technologists has been hitherto little understood this study shows the similarities and differences, and boundaries and overlaps in the knowledge, practices, positions, dispositions and allegiances of the two groupings. An argument of the thesis is for a more cohesive approach to educational development in higher education which embraces learning technologies and higher education policy. Furthermore, this thesis suggests that the balance of power and the value placed on social, cultural and economic capital in the knowledge economy of higher education is shifting; from teaching and learning towards change and ‘innovation’ underpinned by new technologies, business imperatives and new forms of management. This shift in the UK has been reinforced by successive periods of reform and restructuring of the university, where both ‘new’ and ‘old’ professionals are subject to social and political pressures initiated by new forms of central governance and a growing bureaucracy of change. A danger for higher education is that the balance is pulled more towards policy technologies and bureaucracy and away from the professional judgement of university academics/teachers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå School of Education, 2009. p. 276
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar i pedagogiskt arbete, ISSN 1650-8858 ; 30Doktorsavhandlingar inom den Nationella Forskarskolan i Pedagogiskt Arbete, ISSN 1653-6894 ; 19
Keywords
Higher education, technologies, technology, change, new professionals, academic practice.
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-26036 (URN)978-91-7264-824-1 (ISBN)
Distributor:
Interaktiva medier och lärande, 90187, Umeå
Public defence
2009-10-13, Humanisthuset, hörsal E., Umeå University, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-09-22 Created: 2009-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hudson, B., Nordvkelle, Y., Sancho Gil, J. M., Mårell-Olsson, E., Hudson, A. & Laanpere, M. (2008). From teaching to learning: digital portfolio as assessment for learning?. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2008, From Teaching to Learning?, Göteborg, 10-12 September, 2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From teaching to learning: digital portfolio as assessment for learning?
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2008 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124965 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
ECER 2008, From Teaching to Learning?, Göteborg, 10-12 September, 2008
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mårell-Olsson, E. & Hudson, A. (2008). Pedagogical arguments for using digital portfolio in teaching, learning and assessment: making learning visible. In: : . Paper presented at ECER 2008, From Teaching to Learning?, Göteborg, 10-12 September, 2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogical arguments for using digital portfolio in teaching, learning and assessment: making learning visible
2008 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109112 (URN)
External cooperation:
Conference
ECER 2008, From Teaching to Learning?, Göteborg, 10-12 September, 2008
Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mårell-Olsson, E. & Hudson, A. (2008). To make learning visable: in what way can ICT and multimedia contribute?. Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, 15(3/4), 73-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make learning visable: in what way can ICT and multimedia contribute?
2008 (English)In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, ISSN 1404-7659, Vol. 15, no 3/4, p. 73-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall purpose of this article is to make a contribution to current educational debate about learning by exploring theoretical and practical arguments for using Information and Communication Technologies and Multimedia in teaching and learning. The article focuses on epistemological, technological, and pedagogical dimensions and places emphasis on how multimedia and how ICT and multimedia can make different knowledge, skills and understanding visible in teaching and learning. It draws attention to different theories and conceptualizations of learning and uses some practical examples to illuminate how ICT and multimedia can make learning visible. In particular this paper presents two specific cases and illustrates ways in which students develop an ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on their own individual learning and practice and become more active and creative in the development of knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Fakultetsnämnden för lärarutbildning, Umeå universitet, 2008
Keywords
Teaching, Learning, Assessment, Reflection, ICT, Multimedia, Portfolio
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-18999 (URN)
Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Clegg, S., Hudson, A. & Mitchell, A. (2005). The personal created through dialogue: enhancing possibilities through the use of new media. ALT-J - Research in Learning Technology, 13(1), 3-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The personal created through dialogue: enhancing possibilities through the use of new media
2005 (English)In: ALT-J - Research in Learning Technology, ISSN 0968-7769, E-ISSN 1741-1629, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Learning Technology, 2005
Keywords
Higher Education, Teaching, Learning, Media, Affordances, Portfolios, Dialogue
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19064 (URN)10.1080/0968776042000339763 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Clegg, S., Hudson, A. & Steel, J. (2003). The emperor's new clothes: globalisation and e-learning in higher education   . British Journal of Sociology of Education, 24(1), 39-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The emperor's new clothes: globalisation and e-learning in higher education  
2003 (English)In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 39-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Two closely related and over-determining myths have shaped government inspired policy towards Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and education: the one is the irresistible power of globalisation, the other is the determining effect of technology. The result of both is to present the acceptance of e-learning throughout the education system as inevitable. The space left for practitioners in Higher Education is either to embrace the new media enthusiastically or to stand aside and watch its inevitable unfolding. In this paper we develop a critical stance towards the dominant discourse and suggest that the shape of new media in education can be, and is being contested. We argue against both technological determinism and the passive acceptance of the neo-liberal globalisation paradigm. No technologies are neutral. They are always the products of real historical social relations as well as the emergent technical capacities they provide. ICTs as artefacts and social processes are already inscribed with gendered assumptions and the accumulation strategies of their purveyors. Moreover, the conditions under which e-learning is being introduced into education are shaped by managerialist agendas. Placing pedagogy at the forefront is therefore to struggle over the terms and shape of the media adopted. We can see this at both the micro and macro level. Our paper exposes the emperor's new clothes while arguing that there is space for critical discourses that can more meaningfully engage with socially available technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Carfax Publishing, 2003
Keywords
Higher Education, Globalisation, E-Learning, ICT
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19054 (URN)000180225400003 ()
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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