umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Englund, Göran
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 55) Show all publications
Skulason, S., Parsons, K. J., Svanback, R., Räsänen, K., Ferguson, M. M., Adams, C. E., . . . Snorrason, S. S. (2019). A way forward with eco evo devo: an extended theory of resource polymorphism with postglacial fishes as model systems. Biological Reviews, 94(5), 1786-1808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A way forward with eco evo devo: an extended theory of resource polymorphism with postglacial fishes as model systems
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 1786-1808Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A major goal of evolutionary science is to understand how biological diversity is generated and altered. Despite considerable advances, we still have limited insight into how phenotypic variation arises and is sorted by natural selection. Here we argue that an integrated view, which merges ecology, evolution and developmental biology (eco evo devo) on an equal footing, is needed to understand the multifaceted role of the environment in simultaneously determining the development of the phenotype and the nature of the selective environment, and how organisms in turn affect the environment through eco evo and eco devo feedbacks. To illustrate the usefulness of an integrated eco evo devo perspective, we connect it with the theory of resource polymorphism (i.e. the phenotypic and genetic diversification that occurs in response to variation in available resources). In so doing, we highlight fishes from recently glaciated freshwater systems as exceptionally well‐suited model systems for testing predictions of an eco evo devo framework in studies of diversification. Studies on these fishes show that intraspecific diversity can evolve rapidly, and that this process is jointly facilitated by (i) the availability of diverse environments promoting divergent natural selection; (ii) dynamic developmental processes sensitive to environmental and genetic signals; and (iii) eco evo and eco devo feedbacks influencing the selective and developmental environments of the phenotype. We highlight empirical examples and present a conceptual model for the generation of resource polymorphism – emphasizing eco evo devo, and identify current gaps in knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
divergent evolution, epigenetics, genetics, niche construction, non-genetic inheritance, phenotype, phenotypic plasticity, natural selection, polymorphic fishes, speciation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164612 (URN)10.1111/brv.12534 (DOI)000485285900013 ()31215138 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067462518 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Bellard, C., Englund, G. & Hugueny, B. (2019). Biotic and abiotic drivers of species loss rate in isolated lakes. Journal of Animal Ecology, 88(6), 881-891
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biotic and abiotic drivers of species loss rate in isolated lakes
2019 (English)In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 881-891Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Today, anthropogenic impacts are causing a serious crisis for global biodiversity, with rates of extinction increasing at an unprecedented rate. Extinctions typically occur after a certain delay, and understanding the mechanisms causing delays is a key challenge for both fundamental and applied perspectives. Here, we make use of natural experiments, the isolation of lakes by land uplift in Northern Scandinavia, to examine how yearly extinction rates are affected by time since isolation and a range of abiotic and biotic factors. In this aim, we adapted a model of delayed species loss within isolated communities to test the effects of time since isolation, area, pH, depth and the presence/absence of piscivores on extinction rates. As expected, we found that small and/or young lakes experience a higher annual rate of extinctions per species than larger and/or older ones. Compared to previous studies that were conducted for either young (few thousand years ago) or very old (>10,000 years ago) isolates, we demonstrated over a large and continuous temporal scales (50-5,000 years), similar relationship between extinction rates and age. We also show that extinction rates are modified by local environmental factors such as a strong negative effect of increasing pH. Our results urge for the need to consider the time since critical environmental changes occurred when studying extinction rates. In a wider perspective, our study demonstrates the need to consider extinction debts when modelling future effects of climate change, land-use changes or biological invasions on biodiversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
age, aquatic ecosystems, fragmentation, isolation, piscivores
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161598 (URN)10.1111/1365-2656.12980 (DOI)000472660900007 ()30896043 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved
Balint, M., Pfenninger, M., Grossart, H.-P., Taberlet, P., Vellend, M., Leibold, M. A., . . . Bowler, D. (2018). Environmental DNA time series in ecology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 33(12), 945-957
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental DNA time series in ecology
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 945-957Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological communities change in time and space, but long-term dynamics at the century-to-millennia scale are poorly documented due to lack of relevant data sets. Nevertheless, understanding long-term dynamics is important for explaining present-day biodiversity patterns and placing conservation goals in a historical context. Here, we use recent examples and new perspectives to highlight how environmental DNA (eDNA) is starting to provide a powerful new source of temporal data for research questions that have so far been overlooked, by helping to resolve the ecological dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems over hundreds to thousands of years. We give examples of hypotheses that may be addressed by temporal eDNA biodiversity data, discuss possible research directions, and outline related challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154034 (URN)10.1016/j.tree.2018.09.003 (DOI)000450294900010 ()30314916 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Olajos, F., Bokma, F., Bartels, P., Myrstener, E., Rydberg, J., Öhlund, G., . . . Englund, G. (2018). Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 9(3), 535-543
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2041-210X, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  1. Detection of DNA in lake sediments holds promise as a tool to study processes like extinction, colonization, adaptation and evolutionary divergence. However, low concentrations make sediment DNA difficult to detect, leading to high false negative rates. Additionally, contamination could potentially lead to high false positive rates. Careful laboratory procedures can reduce false positive and negative rates, but should not be assumed to completely eliminate them. Therefore, methods are needed that identify potential false positive and negative results, and use this information to judge the plausibility of different interpretations of DNA data from natural archives.
  2. We developed a Bayesian algorithm to infer the colonization history of a species using records of DNA from lake-sediment cores, explicitly labelling some observations as false positive or false negative. We illustrate the method by analysing DNA of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) from sediment cores covering the past 10,000 years from two central Swedish lakes. We provide the algorithm as an R-script, and the data from this study as example input files.
  3. In one lake, Stora Lögdasjön, where connectivity with the proto-Baltic Sea and the degree of whitefish ecotype differentiation suggested colonization immediately after deglaciation, DNA was indeed successfully recovered and amplified throughout the post-glacial sediment. For this lake, we found no loss of detection probability over time, but a high false negative rate. In the other lake, Hotagen, where connectivity and ecotype differentiation suggested colonization long after deglaciation, DNA was amplified only in the upper part of the sediment, and colonization was estimated at 2,200 bp based on the assumption that successful amplicons represent whitefish presence. Here the earliest amplification represents a false positive with a posterior probability of 41%, which increases the uncertainty in the estimated time of colonization.
  4. Complementing careful laboratory procedures aimed at preventing contamination, our method estimates contamination rates from the data. By combining these results with estimates of false negative rates, our models facilitate unbiased interpretation of data from natural DNA archives.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Ecological Society, 2018
Keywords
ancient DNA, colonization, Coregonus lavaretus, detection probability, divergence, environmental DNA, lake sediment, population age
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143248 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12890 (DOI)000426867600010 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5110
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Uszko, W., Diehl, S., Englund, G. & Amarasekare, P. (2017). Effects of warming on predator-prey interactions - a resource-based approach and a theoretical synthesis. Ecology Letters, 20(4), 513-523
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of warming on predator-prey interactions - a resource-based approach and a theoretical synthesis
2017 (English)In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 513-523Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We theoretically explore consequences of warming for predator-prey dynamics, broadening previous approaches in three ways: we include beyond-optimal temperatures, predators may have a type III functional response, and prey carrying capacity depends on explicitly modelled resources. Several robust patterns arise. The relationship between prey carrying capacity and temperature can range from near-independence to monotonically declining/increasing to hump-shaped. Predators persist in a U-shaped region in resource supply (=enrichment)-temperature space. Type II responses yield stable persistence in a U-shaped band inside this region, giving way to limit cycles with enrichment at all temperatures. In contrast, type III responses convey stability at intermediate temperatures and confine cycles to low and high temperatures. Warming-induced state shifts can be predicted from system trajectories crossing stability and persistence boundaries in enrichment-temperature space. Results of earlier studies with more restricted assumptions map onto this graph as special cases. Our approach thus provides a unifying framework for understanding warming effects on trophic dynamics.

Keywords
Carrying capacity, consumer-resource interaction, Daphnia, enrichment, functional response, rsistence, predator-prey interaction, stability, temperature, warming
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133190 (URN)10.1111/ele.12755 (DOI)000397100900013 ()
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Rydberg, C. & Englund, G. (2016). Failed and successful intentional introductions of fish species into 821 Swedish lakes. Ecology, 97(5), 1364-1364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Failed and successful intentional introductions of fish species into 821 Swedish lakes
2016 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 1p. 1364-1364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introductions of fish into lakes can be viewed as whole system experiments, which can be used to study the principles of community assembly and factors determining the outcome of species invasions. Freshwater fish species have been translocated by humans for centuries in Sweden, and this activity has been documented by national and regional authorities starting at the end of the 19th century. Based on this documentation and additional interviews with local fishermen, we have compiled a data set that includes 1157 intentional introductions of 26 freshwater fish species into 821 Swedish lakes. The data include both successful and failed introductions; where a successful introduction means that the introduced fish species was present in the lake for ≥20 yr or that reproduction was observed earlier than that. The oldest introduction is from 1658 and the latest from 2002. Additionally, the data set includes species composition, water temperature sum, maximum water temperature, lake area, elevation, longitude, and latitude for all lakes. These data have been used to test hypotheses about biotic resistance and invasion success in three papers. We found the presence or absence of specific species predicted invasion success better than the species richness of the lakes. We also found that species with high invasion success tend to make a large contribution to biotic resistance, which will make communities more resistant in the future as they are invaded by additional species.

Publisher
p. 1
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130016 (URN)10.1890/15-1707.1 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pauchard, A., Milbau, A., Albihn, A., Alexander, J., Burgess, T., Daehler, C., . . . Kueffer, C. (2016). Non-native and native organisms moving into high elevation and high latitude ecosystems in an era of climate change: new challenges for ecology and conservation. Biological Invasions, 18(2), 345-353
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-native and native organisms moving into high elevation and high latitude ecosystems in an era of climate change: new challenges for ecology and conservation
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 345-353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cold environments at high elevation and high latitude are often viewed as resistant to biological invasions. However, climate warming, land use change and associated increased connectivity all increase the risk of biological invasions in these environments. Here we present a summary of the key discussions of the workshop 'Biosecurity in Mountains and Northern Ecosystems: Current Status and Future Challenges' (Flen, Sweden, 1-3 June 2015). The aims of the workshop were to (1) increase awareness about the growing importance of species expansion-both non-native and native-at high elevation and high latitude with climate change, (2) review existing knowledge about invasion risks in these areas, and (3) encourage more research on how species will move and interact in cold environments, the consequences for biodiversity, and animal and human health and wellbeing. The diversity of potential and actual invaders reported at the workshop and the likely interactions between them create major challenges for managers of cold environments. However, since these cold environments have experienced fewer invasions when compared with many warmer, more populated environments, prevention has a real chance of success, especially if it is coupled with prioritisation schemes for targeting invaders likely to have greatest impact. Communication and co-operation between cold environment regions will facilitate rapid response, and maximise the use of limited research and management resources.

Keywords
Alien species, Arctic, Exotic species, Biosecurity, Migration, Range expansion, Risk, Sub-polar
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117825 (URN)10.1007/s10530-015-1025-x (DOI)000370066200003 ()
Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Wardle A., D., Trygg, J., Diehl, S. & Englund, G. (2016). Strong invaders are strong defenders: implications for the resistance of invaded communities. Ecology Letters, 19(4), 487-494
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strong invaders are strong defenders: implications for the resistance of invaded communities
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 487-494Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many ecosystems receive a steady stream of non-native species. How biotic resistance develops over time in these ecosystems will depend on how established invaders contribute to subsequent resistance. If invasion success and defence capacity (i.e. contribution to resistance) are correlated, then community resistance should increase as species accumulate. If successful invaders also cause most impact (through replacing native species with low defence capacity) then the effect will be even stronger. If successful invaders instead have weak defence capacity or even facilitative attributes, then resistance should decrease with time, as proposed by the invasional meltdown hypothesis. We analysed 1157 introductions of freshwater fish in Swedish lakes and found that species' invasion success was positively correlated with their defence capacity and impact, suggesting that these communities will develop stronger resistance over time. These insights can be used to identify scenarios where invading species are expected to cause large impact.

Keywords
biotic resistance, freshwater fish, introductions, interaction hierarchies, strong invaders, strong defenders, invasions
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110248 (URN)10.1111/ele.12586 (DOI)000372654800015 ()
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Yu, J., Wardle A., D., Trygg, J. & Englund, G. (2016). Weighted species richness outperforms species richness as predictor of biotic resistance. Ecology, 97(1), 262-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weighted species richness outperforms species richness as predictor of biotic resistance
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 262-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The species richness hypothesis, which predicts that species-rich communities should be better at resisting invasions than species-poor communities, has been empirically tested many times and often poorly supported. In this paper we contrast the species richness hypothesis with four alternative hypotheses with the aim of finding better descriptors of invasion resistance. These alternative hypotheses state that resistance to invasions is determined by abiotic conditions, community saturation (i.e., the number of resident species relative to the maximum number of species that can be supported), presence/absence of key species, or weighted species richness. Weighted species richness is a weighted sum of the number of species, where each species' weight describes its contribution to resistance. We tested these hypotheses using data on the success of 571 introductions of four freshwater fish species into lakes throughout Sweden (i.e., Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), tench (Tinca tinca), zander (Sander lucioperca), and whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus)). We found that the weighted species richness best predicted invasion success. The weights describing the contribution of each resident species to community resistance varied considerably in both strength and sign. Positive resistance weights, which indicate that species repel invaders, were as common as negative resistance weights, which indicate facilitative interactions. This result can be contrasted with the implicit assumption of the original species richness hypothesis, that all resident species have negative effects on invader success. We argue that this assumption is unlikely to be true in natural communities, and thus that we expect that weighted species richness is a better predictor of invader success than the actual number of resident species.

Keywords
biotic resistance, freshwater fish, species identity, species richness, saturation, weighted species richness
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110249 (URN)10.1890/15-0463.1 (DOI)000369852600027 ()
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, A., Yu, J., Wardle, D. A. & Englund, G. (2015). Biotic resistance in freshwater fish communities: species richness, saturation or species identity?. Oikos, 124(8), 1058-1064
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biotic resistance in freshwater fish communities: species richness, saturation or species identity?
2015 (English)In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 124, no 8, p. 1058-1064Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Some communities are susceptible to invasions and some are not. Why? Elton suggested in 1958 that the ability of the community to withstand invading species - its biotic resistance - depends on the number of resident species. Later contributors have emphasized the habitat's ability to support species, as well as the contribution of individual species to the resistance. In this study we use information from 184 introductions of Arctic char into Swedish lakes to study both abiotic and biotic aspects of the resident community's ability to resist introductions. We find that the best model included the proportion of forest cover and the proportion of agricultural land cover in the watershed in combination with the presence versus absence of northern pike. Thus, the most important biotic factor to explain the outcome of introductions of Arctic char is the presence of northern pike, a large piscivore. This means that one single species explains the outcome of the introductions better than does the species richness or the saturation level of the community.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107853 (URN)10.1111/oik.01700 (DOI)000359058600010 ()
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications