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Axelsson, P., Sköld, P. & Röver, C. (2019). Ethnic identity and resource rights in Sweden. In: E. Carina H. Keskitalo (Ed.), The politics of Arctic resources: change and continuity in the "Old North" of Northern Europe (pp. 119-139). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic identity and resource rights in Sweden
2019 (English)In: The politics of Arctic resources: change and continuity in the "Old North" of Northern Europe / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 119-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Chapter 7 differs from the previous chapters, focusing on Sami issues as both an area of policy and as having implications for the reindeer husbandry sector (in Sweden pre-eminently and by regulation Sami-based). The chapter illustrates how changes from early Swedish policy respecting Sami rights shifted with external influences (or discourse) that aimed to separate the indigenous population from others. Concurrent policy changes since then have placed large groups outside the defined Sami group at each point in time, made the Sami out to be a more unitary and profession-based (reindeer husbandry) group than they actually are, and even prohibited the general population from taking part in reindeer herding (although this prohibition continues to be disregarded in some places to this day). Thereby, the chapter illustrates how present conflicts can be seen as resulting from policy legacies instituted based on assumptions made in the 1800s.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Series
Transforming environmental politics and policy
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160229 (URN)10.4324/9781315174969-7 (DOI)9781138040601 (ISBN)9781351705349 (ISBN)
Projects
Knut och Alice Wallenberg MAW 2012.0222
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2019-06-15 Created: 2019-06-15 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, P. & Storm Mienna, C. (2019). Health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people. In: Christopher Fleming and Matthew Manning (Ed.), Routledge handbook of indigenous wellbeing: (pp. 13-22). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people
2019 (English)In: Routledge handbook of indigenous wellbeing / [ed] Christopher Fleming and Matthew Manning, Routledge, 2019, p. 13-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter describes the health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people living in Norway, Sweden, Finland and on the Kola Peninsula in Russia. Drawing on a review of the literature, we note that cancer and cardiovascular diseases are examples of conditions that, hitherto, have been thoroughly studied in the Sámi population in relation to physical wellbeing. Generally, studies conclude that the health and living conditions of the Sámi people are good and close to the level of the non-Indigenous benchmark population. However, it is also obvious that knowledge of the Sámi health situation differs between countries, partly due to national laws and policies that circumscribe opportunities to conduct relevant research involving Sámi communities. To understand the current wellbeing of the Sámi people, it is crucial to understand the effects of colonization. As such, this chapter provides a historical background to the present situation. Finally, the chapter aims to identify future challenges that may affect the wellbeing of the Sámi people of northern Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158396 (URN)9781351051262 (ISBN)9781138909175 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Raine, S. C., Kukutai, T., Walter, M., Figueroa-Rodrigues, O. L., Walker, J. & Axelsson, P. (2019). Indigenous data sovereignty. In: Davies, T., Walker, S., Rubinstein, M., & Perini, F. (Ed.), The State of Open Data: Histories and Horizons (pp. 300-319). Cape Town: African Minds
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous data sovereignty
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2019 (English)In: The State of Open Data: Histories and Horizons / [ed] Davies, T., Walker, S., Rubinstein, M., & Perini, F., Cape Town: African Minds, 2019, p. 300-319Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cape Town: African Minds, 2019
National Category
Other Humanities Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160232 (URN)10.5281/zenodo.2677801 (DOI)978-1-928331-95-7 (ISBN)
Note

Section 2: Issues in Open Data

Available from: 2019-06-15 Created: 2019-06-15 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C. & Axelsson, P. (2019). Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 78(1), Article ID 1638195.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 78, no 1, article id 1638195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Indigenous, Sami, health, systematic review, Newcastle-Ottawa scale
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Epidemiology; Public health; Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161416 (URN)10.1080/22423982.2019.1638195 (DOI)000473525200001 ()3126224131262241 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wallenberg Foundations, 2012.0222
Available from: 2019-07-06 Created: 2019-07-06 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, P. & Wisselgren, M. J. (2018). Sweden in 1930 and the 1930 census. In: Gunnar Thorvaldsen (Ed.), Three centuries of northern population censuses: (pp. 61-86). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden in 1930 and the 1930 census
2018 (English)In: Three centuries of northern population censuses / [ed] Gunnar Thorvaldsen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 61-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The primary goal of censuses has always been to collect reliable information on the state's population and provide a basis for governmental decision-making. This study examines the categories used in the 1930 census and links them to the context in which they were generated. We treat the census as a tool of state power, which can be discerned from the definitions of its categories and the way in which statistics are collected and used. The guiding question of the study was "how does the 1930 census differ from previous censuses and how can these differences and changes be explained?" We find that as in earlier censuses, Statistics Sweden used extracts from the parish books on the individual level to collect information for the 1930 census, but also used diverse supplementary sources including tax registers, income tax returns and language surveys. Thus, unlike in most countries, Sweden did not send out census takers or questionnaires to the population. Many of the new or updated variables we see in the 1930 census such as income, wealth, and number of children born, can be related to the political and social debate concerning the poor working class and the establishment of the welfare state. The inclusion of categories such as ethnicity, religion, and foreign nationality can be seen as part of a normative approach wanting to control, monitor and correct deviant elements of the Swedish population. Sweden has several extraordinary longitudinal population databases built on the country’s excellent parish registers dating back to the 18th century. While the Swedish censuses have rarely been used as sources of data for historical analysis, this work demonstrates that the 1930 census has great potential to support new research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
history, historical demography, censuses, population studies, historia, historisk demografi, befolkningsstudier, folkräkningar
National Category
History
Research subject
Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148946 (URN)978-1-138-71828-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, P., Matos, P. & Vos, J. (2017). Introduction. Anais de história de além‑mar, 15, 11-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2017 (English)In: Anais de história de além‑mar, ISSN 0874‑9671, Vol. 15, p. 11-18Article, review/survey (Other academic) In press
Keywords
Historical demography, census, database, Portuguese Empire
National Category
Other Humanities
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130352 (URN)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2019-01-15
Axelsson, P., Teodoro de Matos, P. & Silveira e Sousa, P. (Eds.). (2017). The Demography of the Portuguese Empire: Sources, methods and results, 1776– 1822. Lisbon: Faculdade de Ciências sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Demography of the Portuguese Empire: Sources, methods and results, 1776– 1822
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Alternative title[pt]
A Demografia do Império Português : Fontes, métodos e resultados, 1776–1882
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lisbon: Faculdade de Ciências sociais e Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2017. p. 365
Series
Anais de história de além‑mar, ISSN 0874‑9671 ; 15
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130353 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-18 Created: 2017-01-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Axelsson, P. (2016). Ethnicity, statistics and health in Sweden - ways forward. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 75(33200)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnicity, statistics and health in Sweden - ways forward
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, no 33200Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134311 (URN)10.3402/ijch.v75.33200 (DOI)000396153800154 ()
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Anderson, I., Robson, B., Connolly, M., Al-Yaman, F., Bjertness, E., King, A., . . . Yap, L. (2016). Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study. The Lancet, 388(10040), 131-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study
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2016 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Indigenous health, Population health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Ethnology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124249 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00345-7 (DOI)000379269200030 ()27108232 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Wallenberg Academy FellowsSwedish Research Council, 2012-5490
Available from: 2016-08-02 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, P., Kukutai, T. & Kippen, R. (2016). Indigenous Wellbeing and Colonisation: Editorial. Paper presented at Colonisation, Indigenous Health and History. Journal of Northern Studies, 10(2), 7-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Wellbeing and Colonisation: Editorial
2016 (English)In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 7-18Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2016
Keywords
Colonisation, Health, Indigenous Peoples, Wellbeing
National Category
Social Sciences Humanities and the Arts Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning; History; Population studies; Epidemiology; International Law; Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135701 (URN)
Conference
Colonisation, Indigenous Health and History
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Wallenberg Academy FellowsSwedish Research Council, 2012-5490
Note

Papers in this special issue were originally presented at a workshop on ‘Colonization, Indigenous Health and History’, held in Stockholm in June 2015. This workshop was part of an international, interdisciplinary project ‘Indigenous Health in Transition’ led by Per Axelsson, Tahu Kukutai and Rebecca Kippen. We thank the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the Swedish Research Council for funding this project; and Vaartoe/Centre for Sami Research at Umea° University, the Arctic Research Centre at Umea° University, and the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities for providing additional support for the workshop. We also thank the workshop participants, article authors, article reviewers, and the Journal of Northern Studies.

Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Encoding and Linking Swedish Censuses (SweCens) [2010-05921_VR]; Umeå UniversityIndigenous Health in Transition - a Longitudinal Study of Colonization, State and the Health of Indigenous Peoples in Sweden, Australia and New Zealand, 1850-2000. [2012-05490_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3880-2135

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