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Fjellman-Wiklund, AnncristineORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3334-1376
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Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Wallin, S. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2019). Act with respect: Views of supportive actions for older workers after completion of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 62(4), 585-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Act with respect: Views of supportive actions for older workers after completion of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services
2019 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 585-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The number of older workers will expand during the next decades. Older workers have more long-term health problems and related limitations.

OBJECTIVE: This study examined supportive actions provided in occupational healthcare services to older workers after vocational rehabilitation. An additional purpose was to explore occupational healthcare professionals' views on how to realize and improve adequate support activities.

METHODS: Qualitative and quantitative methods were used, including a postal questionnaire and focus group discussions. Sixty-seven occupational healthcare service units participated in the postal questionnaire. Eight occupational healthcare professionals participated in two focus group discussions. The qualitative data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: The qualitative analysis resulted in one theme (Act with respect), and four categories (Need for cooperation, Collaborative resources of involved stakeholders, Individual needs for support, and Gender as homogenous and separate groups). Quantitative results revealed that the workers' initiative strongly influenced the support carried out. Recommendations from the rehabilitation clinic were almost always considered when deciding on supportive actions. Focus group discussions brought up gender differences especially highlighted in the category Gender as homogenous and separate groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Appropriate support of older workers requires cooperation between involved stakeholders, including occupational healthcare services. Provided support should be based on individual needs, but a mutual practice of determining needed support is requested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2019
Keywords
Work ability, occupational health, aging, gender, support
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159888 (URN)10.3233/WOR-192896 (DOI)000468318200007 ()31104047 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Vikman Lostelius, P., Ståhle-Öberg, L. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2019). Pain in children with cerebral palsy: adolescent siblings’ awareness of pain and perceived influence on their family. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 21(3), 164-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain in children with cerebral palsy: adolescent siblings’ awareness of pain and perceived influence on their family
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To elucidate the experiences of being an adolescent sibling in a family that includes a child with cerebral palsy (CP) and pain, from the perspectives of siblings and parents.

Methods: Seven siblings and 10 parents were individually interviewed to systematically analyse the experiences of siblings and parents with children with CP and pain. The interviews were analysed by using qualitative content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman.

Results: The theme ‘Making pain common ground for support’ and three categories combined the non-disabled adolescent sibling and parental experiences of the child’s pain, and point to the need for support of the non-disabled siblings. Dysfunctional coping influences the siblings’ daily life and future health. Siblings wanted closer contact with the Development Centre in order to alleviate their negative emotions.

Conclusions: As Development Centre physiotherapists meet the families to the child with CP, they can be a link to the sibling. Physiotherapists can educate siblings on pain and how to better cope with stress and emotional discomfort caused by their sibling’s CP and pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
siblings, cerebral palsy, pain perception, psychological adaptation, family relations, physiotherapy modalities, qualitative study
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158671 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2018.1505946 (DOI)000479294100005 ()
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Näsström, A., Wänman, A. & Lövgren, A. (2019). Patients' perceived treatment need owing to temporomandibular disorders and perceptions of related treatment in dentistry: a mixed method study. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 46(9), 792-799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' perceived treatment need owing to temporomandibular disorders and perceptions of related treatment in dentistry: a mixed method study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 792-799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To easily identify patients who could benefit from a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) examination, three screening questions (3Q/TMD) have been introduced in large parts of Sweden. The questions are related to a TMD diagnosis. However, how the questions relate to a treatment need is unknown.

Objectives: The first aim of the study was to identify predicting factors for perceived treatment need among adult individuals who screened positive to the 3Q/TMD. The second aim was to explore individuals' thoughts and experiences related to treatment of their TMD complaint.

Methods: This mixed‐method study with a case‐control design was conducted in Västerbotten, Sweden, during 2014. Individuals who screened positive to at least one of the 3Q/TMD questions were allocated 3Q‐positives, whereas those with negative answers to all questions were allocated 3Q‐negatives. In total, 300 individuals (140 randomly selected 3Q‐positives, and 160 age‐ and gender‐matched 3Q‐negatives) were included. All individuals answered questions related to treatment need. The answers were analysed in a qualitative approach with qualitative content analysis.

Results: In total, 81% of 3Q‐positives expressed a treatment need related to their TMD symptoms. The perceived treatment need was predicted by frequent pain (Q1) and frequent functional disturbances (Q3). Among the 3Q‐positives, 54% reported mistrust in dentists' ability to treat TMD symptoms. The informants expressed a need for information about their symptoms and possible treatment options.

Conclusion: Affirmative answers to 3Q/TMD were associated with TMD treatment need. Dentists should give advice to patients with TMD symptoms and address their concerns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
attitudes, experiences, screening, temporomandibular disorders, treatment need
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158641 (URN)10.1111/joor.12813 (DOI)000480266600002 ()31046174 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-05 Created: 2019-05-05 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Geithner, C. A., Molenaar, C. E., Henriksson, T., Fjellman-Wiklund, A. & Gilenstam, K. (2018). Relative Age Effects in Women’s Ice Hockey: Contributions of Body Size and Maturity Status. Women in Sport & Physical Activity Journal, 26(2), 124-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative Age Effects in Women’s Ice Hockey: Contributions of Body Size and Maturity Status
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2018 (English)In: Women in Sport & Physical Activity Journal, ISSN 1063-6161, E-ISSN 1938-1581, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on relative age effects (RAEs) in women’s ice hockey is lacking data on participant characteristics, particularly body size and maturity status. The purposes of our study were to investigate RAEs in women’s ice hockey players from two countries, and to determine whether RAE patterns could be explained by chronological age, body size, and maturity status. Participants were 54 Swedish elite and 63 Canadian university players. Birthdates were coded by quartiles (Q1–Q4). Weight and height were obtained, and body mass index and chronological age were calculated for each player. Players recalled age at menarche, and maturity status was classified as early, average, or late relative to population-specific means. Chi-square (χ2), odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and effect sizes (Cohen’s w) were calculated using population data across quartiles and for pairwise comparisons between quartiles. Descriptive statistics and MANOVAs were run by quartile and by country. Significant RAEs were found for Canadian players across quartiles (p < .05), along with a Q2 phenomenon (Q2: Q3, Q2: Q4, p < .05). Swedish players were overrepresented in Q3 (Q3: Q4, p < .05). Q4 was significantly underrepresented in both countries (p < .05). The oldest, earliest maturing, and shortest players in both countries were clustered in Q2, whereas the next oldest and latest maturing Swedish players were found in Q3. Age, physical factors, and interactions may contribute to overrepresentations in Q2 and Q3. These findings do not suggest the same bias for greater relative age and maturity found in male ice hockey.

Keywords
birth distribution, female ice hockey, height, maturation, weight
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142865 (URN)10.1123/wspaj.2017-0034 (DOI)
Funder
The Kempe Foundations
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form with the title "Relative age effects in women's ice hockey: international comparisons".

Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Lehti, A., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Stålnacke, B.-M., Hammarström, A. & Wiklund, M. (2017). Walking down 'Via Dolorosa' from primary health care to the specialty pain clinic: patient and professional perceptions of inequity in rehabilitation of chronic pain. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(1), 45-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking down 'Via Dolorosa' from primary health care to the specialty pain clinic: patient and professional perceptions of inequity in rehabilitation of chronic pain
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To analyse patient and professional perceptions about (in)equity of care and rehabilitation of chronic pain patients from primary health care to assessment at a specialty rehabilitation clinic.

SETTING AND METHODS: This qualitative study consists one focus group interview with eight general practitioners who refer patients to pain rehabilitation clinics, 10 individual interviews with patients who were assessed at a pain rehabilitation clinic and seven interviews with professionals participating in multimodal assessment teams at a pain rehabilitation clinic. Interview analysis was conducted by the grounded theory method.

RESULTS: The core category Via Dolorosa, the way of suffering and pain, captured how gender and sociocultural context may contribute to advantages and disadvantages during patient journeys from primary health care to a pain rehabilitation clinic. Patients and professionals perceived pain as a low-ranking illness, and women and men used different gendered strategies to legitimise the pain and to be taken seriously. Being 'a proper patient ready to change' and having 'likeness' between patients and professionals were viewed as advantageous in rehabilitation of pain patients. Patients with higher educational levels were perceived as easier to interact with and had better access to health care. Professional thoughts about gender norms influenced the rehabilitation options. The rehabilitation programme was seen by several professionals to be better suited for women than men, which could lead to unequal care.

CONCLUSION: From an equity and gender perspective, our study highlights the complexity in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients - both from patient and professional perspectives. Awareness of gendered and the biased preconceptions and norms is crucial when professionals struggle to offer equitable health care and rehabilitation.

Keywords
gender, intersectionality, ethnicity, pain, rehabilitation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119190 (URN)10.1111/scs.12312 (DOI)000394988700005 ()26917442 (PubMedID)
Projects
Jämlik vård
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 344-2009- 5839Swedish Research Council, 344-2011-5478
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiklund, M., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Stålnacke, B.-M., Hammarström, A. & Lehti, A. (2016). Access to rehabilitation: patient perceptions of inequalities in access to specialty pain rehabilitation from a gender and intersectional perspective. Global Health Action, 9, Article ID 31542.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Access to rehabilitation: patient perceptions of inequalities in access to specialty pain rehabilitation from a gender and intersectional perspective
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2016 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Long-term musculoskeletal pain is common, particularly among women. Pain conditions are a concern in primary health care, and people with severe and complex pain are referred to specialty health care. There is gender bias in access, counselling, assessment, and treatment of long-term pain.

Objective: This study explores patient accounts and perceptions about important (social) factors for accessing specialised pain rehabilitation from gender and intersectional equality perspectives. We aimed to identify potential biases and inequalities in accessing rehabilitation resources at a specialised rehabilitation clinic.

Design: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 adults after an assessment or completion of a specialised rehabilitation programme in northern Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore patients’ perceptions of important factors for accessing rehabilitation.

Results: One main theme was formulated as Access to rehab – not a given. Three categories of perceived inequality were demonstrated: power of gender, power of social status, and power of diagnosis. Participants perceived rehabilitation as a resource that is not equally available, but dependent on factors such as gender, socio-economic status, ability to work, ethnicity, or age, and more subtle aspects of social status and habitus (e.g. appearance, fitness, and weight). The character of diagnosis received (medical versus psychiatric or social) was also noted.

Conclusions: It is crucial that professionals are aware of how potential inequalities related to gender, social status, and diagnosis, and their intersections, can be created, perceived, and have influence on the processes of assessment and treatment. Reduction of social determinants of health and biases remain important within global, national, and local contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
chronic pain, treatment of pain, multimodal rehabilitation, gender bias, equity in health, intersectionality, qualitative interviews, Sweden, smärta, rehabilitering, jämlik vård, genus, genusbias, intersektionalitet, kvalitativ metod, intervjuer, Sverige
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Physiotherapy
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124847 (URN)10.3402/gha.v9.31542 (DOI)000395813700001 ()28156868 (PubMedID)
Projects
Jämlik vård
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 344-2009-5839Swedish Research Council, 344-2011-5478
Note

This paper is part of the Special Issue: Gender and Health Inequality - intersections with other relevant axes of oppression. 

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hammarström, A., Wiklund, M., Stålnacke, B.-M., Lehti, A., Haukenes, I. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2016). Developing a Tool for Increasing the Awareness about Gendered and Intersectional Processes in the Clinical Assessment of Patients: A Study of Pain Rehabilitation. PLoS ONE, 11(4), Article ID e0152735.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a Tool for Increasing the Awareness about Gendered and Intersectional Processes in the Clinical Assessment of Patients: A Study of Pain Rehabilitation
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e0152735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: There is a need for tools addressing gender inequality in the everyday clinical work in health care. The aim of our paper was to develop a tool for increasing the awareness of gendered and intersectional processes in clinical assessment of patients, based on a study of pain rehabilitation.

METHODS: In the overarching project named "Equal care in rehabilitation" we used multiple methods (both quantitative and qualitative) in five sub studies. With a novel approach we used Grounded Theory in order to synthesize the results from our sub studies, in order to develop the gender equality tool. The gender equality tool described and developed in this article is thus based on results from sub studies about the processes of assessment and selection of patients in pain rehabilitation. Inspired by some questions in earlier tools, we posed open ended questions and inductively searched for findings and concepts relating to gendered and social selection processes in pain rehabilitation, in each of our sub studies. Through this process, the actual gender equality tool was developed as 15 questions about the process of assessing and selecting patients to pain rehabilitation. As a more comprehensive way of understanding the tool, we performed a final step of the GT analyses. Here we synthesized the results of the tool into a comprehensive model with two dimensions in relation to several possible discrimination axes.

RESULTS: The process of assessing and selecting patients was visualized as a funnel, a top down process governed by gendered attitudes, rules and structures. We found that the clinicians judged inner and outer characteristics and status of patients in a gendered and intersectional way in the process of clinical decision-making which thus can be regarded as (potentially) biased with regard to gender, socio-economic status, ethnicity and age.

IMPLICATIONS: The clinical implications of our tool are that the tool can be included in the systematic routine of clinical assessment of patients for both awareness raising and as a base for avoiding gender bias in clinical decision-making. The tool could also be used in team education for health professionals as an instrument for critical reflection on gender bias.

CONCLUSIONS: Thus, tools for clinical assessment can be developed from empirical studies in various clinical settings. However, such a micro-level approach must be understood from a broader societal perspective including gender relations on both the macro- and the meso-level.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Gender Studies
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119116 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0152735 (DOI)000373608000039 ()27055029 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 344-2009- 5839Swedish Research Council, 344-2011-5478
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ahlgren, C., Hammarström, A., Sandberg, S., Lindahl, B., Olsson, T., Larsson, C. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2016). Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23(1), 84-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention.

METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles.

RESULTS: A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase".

CONCLUSION: We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Dietary habits, Engagement, Experience, Intervention, Obese, Qualitative study
National Category
Applied Psychology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111592 (URN)10.1007/s12529-015-9495-x (DOI)000370243400009 ()26041583 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-17 Created: 2015-11-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, T., Vescovi, J. D., Fjellman-Wiklund, A. & Gilenstam, K. (2016). Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competetive-level female ice hockey. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, 7, 81-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competetive-level female ice hockey
2016 (English)In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 7, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

METHODS: Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15-25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm), with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex). The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables.

RESULTS: Regression models (adj R2) for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing long jump alone explained 57.1%, 38.1%, and 29.1% of the variance in skating time during transition agility skate, agility cornering s-turn, and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque in the quadriceps at 90° explained 42.0% and 32.2% of the variance in skating time during agility cornering s-turn and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Field-based assessments, particularly single-leg tests, are an adequate substitute to more expensive and time-consuming laboratory assessments if the purpose is to gain knowledge about key performance characteristics of skating.

Keywords
exercise physiology, physiological characteristics, sport, test methodology
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129435 (URN)10.2147/OAJSM.S109124 (DOI)000399933700002 ()27574474 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-28 Created: 2016-12-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Nordin, E., Skelton, D. A. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2016). Reach the Person behind the Dementia Physical Therapists' Reflections and Strategies when Composing Physical Training. PLoS ONE, 11(12), Article ID e0166686.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reach the Person behind the Dementia Physical Therapists' Reflections and Strategies when Composing Physical Training
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0166686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dementia is a disease characterized by cognitive impairment and physical decline that worsens over time. Exercise is one lifestyle factor that has been identified as a potential means of reducing or delaying progression of the symptoms of dementia, maximizing function and independence. The purpose of this study was to explore physical therapists' (PTs) experiences and reflections on facilitating high-intensity functional exercise with older people living with dementia, in residential care home settings. The study used a qualitative design based on interviews, individually or in small groups, with seven PTs engaged as leaders in the training of older people with dementia. The interviews were analyzed with a modified Grounded Theory method with focus on constant comparisons. To increase trustworthiness the study used triangulation within investigators and member checking. The core category "Discover and act in the moment-learn over time" reflects how the PTs continuously developed their own learning in an iterative process. They built on previous knowledge to communicate with residents and staff and to tailor the high intensity training in relation to each individual at that time point. The category "Be on your toes" highlights how the PTs searched for sufficient information about each individual, before and during training, by eliciting the person's current status from staff and by interpreting the person's body language. The category "Build a bond with a palette of strategies" describes the importance of confirmation to build up trust and the use of group members and the room to create an interplay between exercise and social interaction. These findings highlight the continuous iterative process of building on existing knowledge, sharing and reflecting, being alert to any alterations needed for individuals that day, communication skills (both with residents and staff) and building a relationship and trust with residents in the effective delivery of high intensity functional exercise to older people living with dementia in care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2016
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129728 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0166686 (DOI)000389482700035 ()
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3334-1376

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