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Ryberg, Mats
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Stomby, A., Salami, A., Dahlqvist, P., Evang, J. A., Ryberg, M., Bollerslev, J., . . . Ragnarsson, O. (2019). Elevated resting-state connectivity in the medial temporal lobe and the prefrontal cortex among patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission. European Journal of Endocrinology, 180(5), 329-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated resting-state connectivity in the medial temporal lobe and the prefrontal cortex among patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 5, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Cushing's syndrome is associated with long-term cognitive deficits and affective symptoms such as depression and anxiety. The alterations in brain function under lying these deficits after Cushing's syndrome are unclear and therefore we aimed to explore alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission. Design: Cross-sectional case-control study. Methods: Nineteen women with Cushing's syndrome in remission for a median time of 7 years (IQR: 6-10) and a mean age of 45 years were included at three university clinics. These patients and 38 age-matched female controls underwent brain imaging at a single center. The main outcome measure was functional connectivity at rest, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex networks, exhibited elevated functional connectivity among patients compared to controls. The degree of elevated functional connectivity in the MTL was negatively associated with time in remission. Conclusions: Resting-state functional connectivity within glucocorticoid receptor-rich regions, particularly the MTL and medial prefrontal cortex, was increased in patients. These differences in connectivity may provide a neural basis for the cognitive deficits and affective symptoms commonly experienced by patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bioscientifica, 2019
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159205 (URN)10.1530/EJE-19-0028 (DOI)000466509100003 ()30939453 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Andersson, J., Ståhl, J., Stomby, A., Saleh, A., Waling, M., . . . Olsson, T. (2019). Exercise Training Adds Cardiometabolic Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, 8(2), Article ID e010634.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise Training Adds Cardiometabolic Benefits of a Paleolithic Diet in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e010634Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The accumulation of myocardial triglycerides and remodeling of the left ventricle are common features in type 2 diabetes mellitus and represent potential risk factors for the development of diastolic and systolic dysfunction. A few studies have investigated the separate effects of diet and exercise training on cardiac function, but none have investigated myocardial changes in response to a combined diet and exercise intervention. This 12-week randomized study assessed the effects of a Paleolithic diet, with and without additional supervised exercise training, on cardiac fat, structure, and function.

Methods and Results: Twenty-two overweight and obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomized to either a Paleolithic diet and standard-care exercise recommendations ( PD ) or to a Paleolithic diet plus supervised exercise training 3 hours per week ( PD - EX ). This study includes secondary end points related to cardiac structure and function, ie, myocardial triglycerides levels, cardiac morphology, and strain were measured using cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including proton spectroscopy, at baseline and after 12 weeks. Both groups showed major favorable metabolic changes. The PD - EX group showed significant decreases in myocardial triglycerides levels (-45%, P=0.038) and left ventricle mass to end-diastolic volume ratio (-13%, P=0.008) while the left ventricle end-diastolic volume and stroke volume increased significantly (+14%, P=0.004 and +17%, P=0.008, respectively). These variables were unchanged in the PD group.

Conclusions: Exercise training plus a Paleolithic diet reduced myocardial triglycerides levels and improved left ventricle remodeling in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Clinical Trial Registration URL : http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT 01513798.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, diet, exercise, myocardial metabolism, type 2 diabetes mellitus
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157046 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.118.010634 (DOI)000460105800010 ()30652528 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Ryberg, M., Mellberg, C., Andersson, T., Chorell, E., Lindahl, B., . . . Olsson, T. (2019). Postprandial levels of GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon after two years of weight loss with a Paleolithic diet: a randomized controlled trial in healthy obese women. European Journal of Endocrinology, 180(6), 417-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postprandial levels of GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon after two years of weight loss with a Paleolithic diet: a randomized controlled trial in healthy obese women
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 6, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate how weight loss by different diets impacts on postprandial levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon.

METHODS: In this single-centre, parallel group 2-year trial, 70 healthy postmenopausal obese women were randomized to the Paleolithic diet or a healthy control diet based on Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Both diets were without calorie restriction. The primary outcome was the change in fat mass. Here, secondary analyses on GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon measured during an OGTT are described.

RESULTS: In the Paleolithic diet group, mean weight loss compared to baseline was 11% at 6 months, and 10% at 24 months. In the control diet group, mean weight loss was 6% after 6 and 24 months (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.049 for the comparison between groups at 6 and 24 months respectively). Compared to baseline, the mean incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for GLP-1 increased by 34% and 45% after 6 and 24 months in the Paleolithic diet group, and increased by 59% after 24 months in the control diet group. The mean iAUC for GIP increased only in the Paleolithic diet group. The AUC for glucagon increased during the first 6 months in both groups. The fasting glucagon increase correlated with the β-hydroxybutyrate increase.

CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss caused an increase in postprandial GLP-1 levels and a further rise occurred during weight maintenance. Postprandial GIP levels increased only after the Paleolithic diet. Reduced postprandial glucagon suppression may be caused by a catabolic state.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bioscientifica, 2019
Keywords
glucagon, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucose tolerance test, Paleolithic diet, weight loss
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158775 (URN)10.1530/EJE-19-0082 (DOI)000468743400012 ()31042670 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-0699Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-0398Swedish Research Council, K2011-12237-15-16Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Diabetes AssociationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Isaksson, A., Söderström, I., Ryberg, M., . . . Olsson, T. (2018). A heterogeneous response of liver and skeletal muscle fat to the combination of a Paleolithic diet and exercise in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial. Diabetologia, 61(7), 1548-1559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A heterogeneous response of liver and skeletal muscle fat to the combination of a Paleolithic diet and exercise in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial
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2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 1548-1559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims/hypothesis: The aim of the study was to investigate ectopic fat deposition and insulin sensitivity, in a parallel single-blinded randomised controlled trial, comparing Paleolithic diet alone with the combination of Paleolithic diet and exercise in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Thirty-two individuals with type 2 diabetes with BMI 25-40 kg/m(2) and 30-70 years of age followed a Paleolithic diet ad libitum for 12 weeks. In addition, study participants were randomised by computer program to either supervised combined exercise training (PD-EX group) or standard care exercise recommendations (PD group). Staff performing examinations and assessing outcomes were blinded to group assignment. Thirteen participants were analysed in each group: hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were measured using the hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp technique combined with [6,6-H-2(2)]glucose infusion, and liver fat was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy; both analyses were secondary endpoints. Intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content was measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a secondary analysis. All examinations were performed at Umca University Hospital, Umca, Sweden. Results: Both study groups showed a median body weight loss of 7 kg. Fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg in the PD group and by 6.5 kg in the PD-EX group. Maximum oxygen uptake increased in the PD-EX group only. Liver fat showed a consistent reduction (74% decrease) in the PD group, while the response in the PD-EX group was heterogeneous (p < 0.05 for the difference between groups). IMCL content of the soleus muscle decreased by 40% in the PD group and by 22% in the PD-EX group (p < 0.05 for the difference between groups). Both groups improved their peripheral and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, but not their hepatic insulin sensitivity. Plasma fetuin-A decreased by 11% in the PD group (p < 0.05) and remained unchanged in the PD-EX group. Liver fat changes during the intervention were correlated with changes in fetuin-A (r(S) = 0.63, p < 0.01). Participants did not report any important adverse events caused by the intervention. Conclusions/interpretation: A Paleolithic diet reduced liver fat and IMCL content, while there was a tissue-specific heterogeneous response to added exercise training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Exercise, Hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, Insulin sensitivity, Intramyocellular fat, Liver fat, Nutrition, Obesity, Paleolithic diet, Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Weight loss
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150764 (URN)10.1007/s00125-018-4618-y (DOI)000434250500007 ()29696296 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Manousou, S., Stål, M., Larsson, C., Mellberg, C., Lindahl, B., Eggertsen, R., . . . Nyström, H. F. (2018). A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 72(1), 124-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 124-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Different diets are used for weight loss. A Paleolithic-type diet (PD) has beneficial metabolic effects, but two of the largest iodine sources, table salt and dairy products, are excluded. The objectives of this study were to compare 24-h urinary iodine concentration (24-UIC) in subjects on PD with 24-UIC in subjects on a diet according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) and to study if PD results in a higher risk of developing iodine deficiency (ID), than NNR diet.

SUBJECTS/METHODS: A 2-year prospective randomized trial in a tertiary referral center where healthy postmenopausal overweight or obese women were randomized to either PD (n=35) or NNR diet (n=35). Dietary iodine intake, 24-UIC, 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-UIE), free thyroxin (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Completeness of urine sampling was monitored by para-aminobenzoic acid and salt intake by urinary sodium.

RESULTS: At baseline, median 24-UIC (71.0 μg/l) and 24-UIE (134.0 μg/d) were similar in the PD and NNR groups. After 6 months, 24-UIC had decreased to 36.0 μg/l (P=0.001) and 24-UIE to 77.0 μg/d (P=0.001) in the PD group; in the NNR group, levels were unaltered. FT4, TSH and FT3 were similar in both groups, except for FT3 at 6 months being lower in PD than in NNR group.

CONCLUSIONS: A PD results in a higher risk of developing ID, than a diet according to the NNR. Therefore, we suggest iodine supplementation should be considered when on a PD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140504 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2017.134 (DOI)000419795000017 ()28901333 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Blomquist, C., Chorell, E., Ryberg, M., Mellberg, C., Worrsjö, E., Makoveichuk, E., . . . Olsson, T. (2018). Decreased lipogenesis-promoting factors in adipose tissue in postmenopausal women with overweight on a Paleolithic-type diet. European Journal of Nutrition, 57(8), 2877-2886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased lipogenesis-promoting factors in adipose tissue in postmenopausal women with overweight on a Paleolithic-type diet
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 2877-2886Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: We studied effects of diet-induced postmenopausal weight loss on gene expression and activity of proteins involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis in adipose tissue.

Methods: Fifty-eight postmenopausal women with overweight (BMI 32.5 ± 5.5) were randomized to eat an ad libitum Paleolithic-type diet (PD) aiming for a high intake of protein and unsaturated fatty acids or a prudent control diet (CD) for 24 months. Anthropometry, plasma adipokines, gene expression of proteins involved in fat metabolism in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and mass in SAT were measured at baseline and after 6 months. LPL mass and activity were also measured after 24 months.

Results: The PD led to improved insulin sensitivity (P < 0.01) and decreased circulating triglycerides (P < 0.001), lipogenesis-related factors, including LPL mRNA (P < 0.05), mass (P < 0.01), and activity (P < 0.001); as well as gene expressions of CD36 (P < 0.05), fatty acid synthase, FAS (P < 0.001) and diglyceride acyltransferase 2, DGAT2 (P < 0.001). The LPL activity (P < 0.05) and gene expression of DGAT2 (P < 0.05) and FAS (P < 0.05) were significantly lowered in the PD group versus the CD group at 6 months and the LPL activity (P < 0.05) remained significantly lowered in the PD group compared to the CD group at 24 months.

Conclusions: Compared to the CD, the PD led to a more pronounced reduction of lipogenesis-promoting factors in SAT among postmenopausal women with overweight. This could have mediated the favorable metabolic effects of the PD on triglyceride levels and insulin sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
diet, fat metabolism, lipoprotein lipase, obesity, postmenopausal women
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141559 (URN)10.1007/s00394-017-1558-0 (DOI)000450829600020 ()29075849 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2019-05-10Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Chorell, E., Ryberg, M., Svensson, M., . . . Olsson, T. (2018). The liver-alpha-cell axis during weight loss in type 2 diabetes. Paper presented at 54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY. Diabetologia, 61, S97-S98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The liver-alpha-cell axis during weight loss in type 2 diabetes
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2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, p. S97-S98Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152243 (URN)000443556001192 ()
Conference
54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY
Funder
Swedish Diabetes AssociationSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Stomby, A., Otten, J., Ryberg, M., Nyberg, L., Olsson, T. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2017). A Paleolithic Diet with and without Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Increases Functional Brain Responses and Hippocampal Volume in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 9, Article ID 391.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Paleolithic Diet with and without Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Increases Functional Brain Responses and Hippocampal Volume in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes
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2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 9, article id 391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
type 2 diabetes, paleolithic diet, exercise, magnetic resonance imaging, episodic memory
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142120 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2017.00391 (DOI)000416906800001 ()29255413 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Blomquist, C., Alvehus, M., Burén, J., Ryberg, M., Larsson, C., Lindahl, B., . . . Olsson, T. (2017). Attenuated Low-Grade Inflammation Following Long-Term Dietary Intervention in Postmenopausal Women with Obesity. Obesity, 25(5), 892-900
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attenuated Low-Grade Inflammation Following Long-Term Dietary Intervention in Postmenopausal Women with Obesity
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2017 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 892-900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Abdominal fat accumulation after menopause is associated with low-grade inflammation and increased risk of metabolic disorders. Effective long-term lifestyle treatment is therefore needed.

METHODS: Seventy healthy postmenopausal women (age 60 ± 5.6 years) with BMI 32.5 ± 5.5 were randomized to a Paleolithic-type diet (PD) or a prudent control diet (CD) for 24 months. Blood samples and fat biopsies were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 24 months to analyze inflammation-related parameters.

RESULTS: Android fat decreased significantly more in the PD group (P = 0.009) during the first 6 months with weight maintenance at 24 months in both groups. Long-term significant effects (P < 0.001) on adipose gene expression were found for toll-like receptor 4 (decreased at 24 months) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (increased at 24 months) in both groups. Serum interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α levels were decreased at 24 months in both groups (P < 0.001) with a significant diet-by-time interaction for serum IL-6 (P = 0.022). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was decreased in the PD group at 24 months (P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: A reduction of abdominal obesity in postmenopausal women is linked to specific changes in inflammation-related adipose gene expression.

National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134986 (URN)10.1002/oby.21815 (DOI)000400045000013 ()28440046 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2011-12237-15-6
Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Otten, J., Stomby, A., Waling, M., Isaksson, A., Tellström, A., Lundin-Olsson, L., . . . Olsson, T. (2017). Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, 33(1), Article ID e2828.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control: a randomized controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes
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2017 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 33, no 1, article id e2828Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Means to reduce future risk for cardiovascular disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed.

Methods

Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes (age 59 ± 8 years) followed a Paleolithic diet for 12 weeks. Participants were randomized to either standard care exercise recommendations (PD) or 1-h supervised exercise sessions (aerobic exercise and resistance training) three times per week (PD-EX).

Results

For the within group analyses, fat mass decreased by 5.7 kg (IQR: −6.6, −4.1; p < 0.001) in the PD group and by 6.7 kg (−8.2, −5.3; p < 0.001) in the PD-EX group. Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) improved by 45% in the PD (p < 0.001) and PD-EX (p < 0.001) groups. HbA1c decreased by 0.9% (−1.2, −0.6; p < 0.001) in the PD group and 1.1% (−1.7, −0.7; p < 0.01) in the PD-EX group. Leptin decreased by 62% (p < 0.001) in the PD group and 42% (p < 0.001) in the PD-EX group. Maximum oxygen uptake increased by 0.2 L/min (0.0, 0.3) in the PD-EX group, and remained unchanged in the PD group (p < 0.01 for the difference between intervention groups). Male participants decreased lean mass by 2.6 kg (−3.6, −1.3) in the PD group and by 1.2 kg (−1.3, 1.0) in the PD-EX group (p < 0.05 for the difference between intervention groups).

Conclusions

A Paleolithic diet improves fat mass and metabolic balance including insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and leptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Supervised exercise training may not enhance the effects on these outcomes, but preserves lean mass in men and increases cardiovascular fitness.

Keywords
type 2 diabetes, Paleolithic diet, diet intervention, exercise, glycosyl-ated haemoglobin A, insulin sensitivity, leptin
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126188 (URN)10.1002/dmrr.2828 (DOI)000397102800010 ()
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
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