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Byass, Peter
Publications (10 of 228) Show all publications
Byass, P., Jackson Cole, C., Davies, J. I., Geldsetzer, P., Witham, M. D. & Wu, Y. (2018). Collaboration for impact in global health [Letter to the editor]. The Lancet Global Health, 6(8), e836-e837
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaboration for impact in global health
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e836-e837Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150560 (URN)10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30296-1 (DOI)000438821600014 ()30012262 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049729744 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-13Bibliographically approved
Davies, J. I., Macnab, A. J., Byass, P., Norris, S. A., Nyirenda, M., Singhal, A., . . . Daar, A. S. (2018). Developmental origins of health and disease in Africa: influencing early life. The Lancet Global Health, 6(3), E244-E245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental origins of health and disease in Africa: influencing early life
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. E244-E245Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145363 (URN)10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30036-6 (DOI)000424738900009 ()29433658 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nair, H. & Byass, P. (2018). Mortality in older children and adolescents: the forgotten ones. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, 2(5), 306-307
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality in older children and adolescents: the forgotten ones
2018 (English)In: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, ISSN 2352-4642, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 306-307Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155191 (URN)10.1016/S2352-4642(18)30067-1 (DOI)000434768900004 ()30169260 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044028122 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Wilder-Smith, A., Tissera, H., AbuBakar, S., Kittayapong, P., Logan, J., Neumayr, A., . . . Preet, R. (2018). Novel tools for the surveillance and control of dengue: findings by the dengueTools research consortium. Global Health Action, 11(1), Article ID 1549930.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel tools for the surveillance and control of dengue: findings by the dengueTools research consortium
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2018 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1549930Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Dengue fever persists as a major global disease burden, and may increase as a consequence of climate change. Along with other measures, research actions to improve diagnosis, surveillance, prevention, and predictive models are highly relevant. The European Commission funded the DengueTools consortium to lead a major initiative in these areas, and this review synthesises the outputs and findings of this work conducted from 2011 to 2016. Research areas: DengueTools organised its work into three research areas, namely [1] Early warning and surveillance systems; [2] Strategies to prevent dengue in children; and [3] Predictive models for the global spread of dengue. Research area 1 focused on case-studies undertaken in Sri Lanka, including developing laboratory-based sentinel surveillance, evaluating economic impact, identifying drivers of transmission intensity, evaluating outbreak prediction capacity and developing diagnostic capacity. Research area 2 addressed preventing dengue transmission in school children, with case-studies undertaken in Thailand. Insecticide-treated school uniforms represented an intriguing potential approach, with some encouraging results, but which were overshadowed by a lack of persistence of insecticide on the uniforms with repeated washing. Research area 3 evaluated potential global spread of dengue, particularly into dengue-naive areas such as Europe. The role of international travel, changing boundaries of vectors, developing models of vectorial capacity under different climate change scenarios and strategies for vector control in outbreaks was all evaluated. Concluding remarks: DengueTools was able to make significant advances in methods for understanding and controlling dengue transmission in a range of settings. These will have implications for public health agendas to counteract dengue, including vaccination programmes. Outlook: Towards the end of the DengueTools project, Zika virus emerged as an unexpected epidemic in the central and southern America. Given the similarities between the dengue and Zika viruses, with vectors in common, some of the DengueTools thinking translated readily into the Zika situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Dengue, DengueTools, surveillance, impregnated clothing, schools, Aedes, vectorial capacity, edictive modelling, importation, travel, Zika, reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase plification
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154333 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2018.1549930 (DOI)000451847300001 ()
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2018-12-27Bibliographically approved
Nyirenda, M. J., Ramsay, M. & Byass, P. (2018). Patterns of adult body mass in sub-Saharan Africa. Global Health Action, 11, 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of adult body mass in sub-Saharan Africa
2018 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, p. 1-3Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155484 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2018.1556497 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-01-18Bibliographically approved
Watts, N., Amann, M., Arnell, N., Ayeb-Karlsson, S., Belesova, K., Berry, H., . . . Costello, A. (2018). The 2018 report of the Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: shaping the health of nations for centuries to come. The Lancet, 392(10163), 2479-2514, Article ID S0140-6736(18)32594-7.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The 2018 report of the Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: shaping the health of nations for centuries to come
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 392, no 10163, p. 2479-2514, article id S0140-6736(18)32594-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154381 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32594-7 (DOI)30503045 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Watts, N., Amann, M., Ayeb-Karlsson, S., Belesova, K., Bouley, T., Boykoff, M., . . . Costello, A. (2018). The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: from 25 years of inaction to a global transformation for public health. The Lancet, 391(10120), 581-630
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: from 25 years of inaction to a global transformation for public health
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 391, no 10120, p. 581-630Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Lancet Countdown tracks progress on health and climate change and provides an independent assessment of the health effects of climate change, the implementation of the Paris Agreement, 1 and the health implications of these actions. It follows on from the work of the 2015 Lancet Commission on Health and Climate Change, 2 which concluded that anthropogenic climate change threatens to undermine the past 50 years of gains in public health, and conversely, that a comprehensive response to climate change could be "the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century". The Lancet Countdown is a collaboration between 24 academic institutions and intergovernmental organisations based in every continent and with representation from a wide range of disciplines. The collaboration includes climate scientists, ecologists, economists, engineers, experts in energy, food, and transport systems, geographers, mathematicians, social and political scientists, public health professionals, and doctors. It reports annual indicators across five sections: climate change impacts, exposures, and vulnerability; adaptation planning and resilience for health; mitigation actions and health co-benefits; economics and finance; and public and political engagement. The key messages from the 40 indicators in the Lancet Countdown's 2017 report are summarised below.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143784 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32464-9 (DOI)000424649400035 ()29096948 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Byass, P. (2018). The potential of community engagement to improve mother and child health in Ethiopia – what works and how should it be measured?. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 18(Suppl 1), Article ID 366.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The potential of community engagement to improve mother and child health in Ethiopia – what works and how should it be measured?
2018 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no Suppl 1, article id 366Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155190 (URN)10.1186/s12884-018-1974-z (DOI)30255787 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053848409 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Nichols, E. K., Byass, P., Chandramohan, D., Clark, S. J., Flaxman, A. D., Jakob, R., . . . Setel, P. W. (2018). The WHO 2016 verbal autopsy instrument: An international standard suitable for automated analysis by InterVA, InSilicoVA, and Tariff 2.0. PLoS Medicine, 15(1), Article ID e1002486.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The WHO 2016 verbal autopsy instrument: An international standard suitable for automated analysis by InterVA, InSilicoVA, and Tariff 2.0
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2018 (English)In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 15, no 1, article id e1002486Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Verbal autopsy (VA) is a practical method for determining probable causes of death at the population level in places where systems for medical certification of cause of death are weak. VA methods suitable for use in routine settings, such as civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems, have developed rapidly in the last decade. These developments have been part of a growing global momentum to strengthen CRVS systems in low-income countries. With this momentum have come pressure for continued research and development of VA methods and the need for a single standard VA instrument on which multiple automated diagnostic methods can be developed.

Methods and findings: In 2016, partners harmonized a WHO VA standard instrument that fully incorporates the indicators necessary to run currently available automated diagnostic algorithms. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality. This VA instrument offers the opportunity to harmonize the automated diagnostic algorithms in the future.

Conclusions: Despite all improvements in design and technology, VA is only recommended where medical certification of cause of death is not possible. The method can nevertheless provide sufficient information to guide public health priorities in communities in which physician certification of deaths is largely unavailable. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144955 (URN)10.1371/journal.pmed.1002486 (DOI)000423818400007 ()29320495 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Byass, P. (2018). Universal health coverage is needed to deliver NCD control [Letter to the editor]. The Lancet, 391(10122), 738-738
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Universal health coverage is needed to deliver NCD control
2018 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 391, no 10122, p. 738-738Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lancet Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150561 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30244-7 (DOI)29486940 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
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