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Gallego, Gisselle
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Håkansson Lindqvist, M., Gustafsson, M. & Gallego, G. (2019). Exploring physicians, nurses and ward-based pharmacists working relationships in a Swedish inpatient setting: a mixed methods study. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, 41(3), 728-733
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring physicians, nurses and ward-based pharmacists working relationships in a Swedish inpatient setting: a mixed methods study
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In Sweden there has been limited work investigating the integration and nature of collaborative relationships between pharmacists and other healthcare practitioners. ObjectiveTo explore the working relationships of physicians, nurses and ward-based pharmacists in a rural hospital after the introduction of a clinical pharmacy service. Setting General medical ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Method Mixed methods involving face-to-face semi-structured interviews with nurses, physicians and pharmacists, and a physician survey using the Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index to measure the extent of physician-reported collaborative working relationships. Main outcome measure Perceptions about collaborative working relationships between physician, nurses and pharmacists. Results All physicians (n = 9) who interacted with the clinical pharmacists completed the survey. The mean total score was 78.6 ± 4.7, total 92 (higher scores represent a more advanced relationship). Mean domain scores were highest for relationship initiation (13.0 ± 1.3, total 15), and trustworthiness (38.9 ± 3.4, total 42), followed by role specification (26.3 ± 2.6, total 30). The interviews (with nurses and physicians), showed how communication, collaboration and joint knowledge-exchange in the intervention changed and developed over time. Conclusion This study provides new insights into collaborative working relationships from the perspectives of physicians and nurses. The Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index scores suggest that physicians felt that clinical pharmacists were active in providing patient care; could be trusted to follow up on recommendations; and were credible. The interviews suggest that the team-based intervention provided good conditions for creating new ways to work to achieve commitment to professional working relationships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Clinical pharmacy, Collaboration, Nurses, Physicians, Sweden
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161463 (URN)10.1007/s11096-019-00812-8 (DOI)000470689000014 ()30937695 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Wilson, N. J., Macdonald, J., Hayman, B., Bright, A. M., Frawley, P. & Gallego, G. (2018). A narrative review of the literature about people with intellectual disability who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 22(2), 171-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A narrative review of the literature about people with intellectual disability who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1744-6295, E-ISSN 1744-6309, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 171-196Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This narrative review of the research literature presents a summary about the key issues facing people with intellectual disability (ID) who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex or questioning (LGBTIQ). The aim of this review was to consolidate research of the topic; to identify whether any pilot studies reporting social/sexual/educational interventions had been published; and to offer some perspective on the type of future research required to better inform policy, practice and theory that may lead to better outcomes for people with ID who identify as LGBTIQ. Almost all of the research literature on the topic is either exploratory or descriptive which serves to outline the range of issues faced by people with ID who identify as LGBTIQ. Urgently needed as the next step, however, is a concerted effort to conduct a range of innovative educational and social interventions with collection of targeted and appropriate outcomes data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
intellectual disability, sexuality, research, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, questioning
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149014 (URN)10.1177/1744629516682681 (DOI)000433426100006 ()27932634 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047665599 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Mattsson, S., Wallman, A. & Gallego, G. (2018). Pharmacists' satisfaction with their work: Analysis of an alumni survey. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 14(7), 700-704
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacists' satisfaction with their work: Analysis of an alumni survey
2018 (English)In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 700-704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The level of job satisfaction among practicing pharmacists is important because it has been found to affect job performance and employee turnover. The Swedish pharmacy market has undergone major changes in recent years, and little is known about pharmacists' job satisfaction.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the level of job satisfaction and associated factors among graduates from the web-based pharmacy programs at Umea University.

Methods: Job satisfaction of pharmacists was measured as part of an alumni survey conducted with those who graduated from the pharmacy programmes between 2006 and 2014. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, and logistic regression was used to explore factors affecting job satisfaction.

Results: The total number of graduates who completed the survey was 222 (response rate 43%.) The majority of respondents were female (95%), and most were employed at a community pharmacy (85%). The mean age was 39.7 years. The majority of graduates (91%) were satisfied with their job "most of the time" or "all of the time", and 87% of the respondents would "definitely" or "maybe" choose the same career again. The multivariate analysis showed that increasing years in the current position (OR: 0.672 (0.519-0.871)) was associated with lower job satisfaction. Older age (OR: 1.123 (1.022-1.234)), the perception that the knowledge and skills acquired during university education is useful in the current job (OR: 4.643 (1.255-17.182)) and access to continuing professional development (OR: 9.472 (1.965 -45.662)) were associated with higher job satisfaction.

Conclusion: Most graduates from the web-based pharmacy programmes were satisfied with their current job. Access to continuing professional development seems to be important for the level of job satisfaction among pharmacists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Job satisfaction, Pharmacy education, Continuing professional development
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150749 (URN)10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.08.006 (DOI)000436607800011 ()28870444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028652433 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Vinterflod, C., Gustafsson, M., Mattsson, S. & Gallego, G. (2018). Physicians' perspectives on clinical pharmacy services in Northern Sweden: a qualitative study. BMC Health Services Research, 18, Article ID 35.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physicians' perspectives on clinical pharmacy services in Northern Sweden: a qualitative study
2018 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In many countries, clinical pharmacists are part of health care teams that work to optimize drug therapy and ensure patient safety. However, in Sweden, clinical pharmacy services (CPSs) in hospital settings have not been widely implemented and regional differences exist in the uptake of these services. Physicians' attitudes toward CPSs and collaborating with clinical pharmacists may facilitate or hinder the implementation and expansion of the CPSs and the role of the clinical pharmacist in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to explore physicians' perceptions regarding CPSs performed at hospital wards in Northern Sweden.

Methods: Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of nine physicians who had previously worked with clinical pharmacists between November 2014 and January 2015. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using a constant comparison method.

Results: Different themes emerged regarding physicians' views of clinical pharmacy; two main interlinked themes were service factors and pharmacist factors. The service was valued and described in a positive way by all physicians. It was seen as an opportunity for them to learn more about pharmacological treatment and also an opportunity to discuss patient medication treatment in detail. Physicians considered that CPSs could improve patient outcomes and they valued continuity and the ability to build a trusting relationship with the pharmacists over time. However, there was a lack of awareness of the CPSs. All physicians knew that one of the pharmacist's roles is to conduct medication reviews, but most of them were only able to describe a few elements of what this service encompasses. Pharmacists were described as "drug experts" and their recommendations were perceived as clinically relevant. Physicians wanted CPSs to continue and to be implemented in other wards.

Conclusions: All physicians were positive regarding CPSs and were satisfied with the collaboration with the clinical pharmacists. These findings are important for further implementation and expansion of CPSs, particularly in Northern Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
clinical pharmacy, physicians, collaboration, hospital, Sweden
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144831 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-2841-3 (DOI)000423228600001 ()29361941 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Haynes, A., Butow, P., Brennan, S., Williamson, A., Redman, S., Carter, S., . . . Rudge, S. (2018). The pivotal position of 'liaison people': facilitating a research utilisation intervention in policy agencies. Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, 14(1), 7-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The pivotal position of 'liaison people': facilitating a research utilisation intervention in policy agencies
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2018 (English)In: Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, ISSN 1744-2648, E-ISSN 1744-2656, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 7-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the enormous variation in views, championing behaviours and impacts of liaison people: staff nominated to facilitate, tailor and promote SPIRIT (a research utilisation intervention trial in six Australian health policy agencies). Liaison people made cost/benefit analyses: they weighed the value of participation against its risks and demands in the context of organisational goals, knowledge utilisation norms, epistemology and leadership support. There was a degree of self-fulfilment (organisations got what they put in), but SPIRIT could not always be tailored to address local knowledge needs. We present nine propositions for identifying and supporting liaison people in similar interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Policy Press, 2018
Keywords
research utilisation, faciliation, championing, process evaluation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146585 (URN)10.1332/174426416X14817284217163 (DOI)000427722000002 ()
Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjölander, M., Gustafsson, M. & Gallego, G. (2017). Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of a ward-based pharmacist in rural northern Sweden. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, 39(4), 953-959
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of a ward-based pharmacist in rural northern Sweden
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 953-959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background This project is part of the prospective quasi experimental proof-of-concept investigation of clinical pharmacist intervention study to reduce drug-related problems among people admitted to a ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Objective To explore doctors' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of having a ward-based pharmacist providing clinical pharmacy services. Setting Medical ward in a rural hospital in northern Sweden. Method Eighteen face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of doctors and nurses working on the ward where the clinical pharmacy service was due to be implemented. Semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measure Perceptions and expectations of nurses and doctors. Results Doctors and nurses had limited experience of working with pharmacists. Most had a vague idea of what pharmacists can contribute within a ward setting. Participants, mainly nurses, suggested inventory and drug distribution roles, but few were aware of the pharmacists' skills and clinical competence. Different views were expressed on whether the new clinical pharmacy service would have an impact on workload. However, most participants took a positive view of having a ward-based pharmacist. Conclusion This study provided an opportunity to explore doctors' and nurses' expectations of the role of clinical pharmacists before a clinical pharmacy service was implemented. To successfully implement a clinical pharmacy service, roles, clinical competence and responsibilities should be clearly described. Furthermore, it is important to focus on collaborative working relationships between doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138074 (URN)10.1007/s11096-017-0488-5 (DOI)000407126200042 ()28547729 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Englund, C., Gustafsson, M. & Gallego, G. (2017). Pharmacy Students' Attitudes and Perceptions of "Virtual Worlds" as an Instructional Tool for Clinical Pharmacy Teaching. Pharmacy, 5(1), Article ID 5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacy Students' Attitudes and Perceptions of "Virtual Worlds" as an Instructional Tool for Clinical Pharmacy Teaching
2017 (English)In: Pharmacy, ISSN 2226-4787, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objectives of this study were to explore pharmacy students’ perceptions and experiences of three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVWs) as an instructional tool for clinical pharmacy teaching. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with Master of Science in Pharmacy students who had participated in communicative exercises in a 3DVW. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. More than half of the students were positive to using 3DVWs for educational purposes and see the advantages of having a setting where communication can be practiced in an authentic but ‘safe’ environment available online. However, many students also reported technical difficulties in using the 3DVW which impacted negatively on the learning experience. Perceived ease of use and usefulness of 3DVWs appears to play an important role for students. The students’ level of engagement relates to not only their computer skills, but also to the value they place on 3DVWs as an instructional tool.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2017
Keywords
three-dimensional virtual worlds, clinical pharmacy teaching, pharmacy school
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences Other Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131064 (URN)10.3390/pharmacy5010005 (DOI)000398733300004 ()
Available from: 2017-02-05 Created: 2017-02-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Englund, C. & Gallego, G. (2017). The description and evaluation of virtual worlds in clinical pharmacy education in Northern Sweden. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, 9(5), 887-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The description and evaluation of virtual worlds in clinical pharmacy education in Northern Sweden
2017 (English)In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1877-1297, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 887-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the use of a three-dimensional virtual world (3DVW) in a clinical pharmacy course.

Educational activity and setting: Students are provided with training opportunities in simulated ward rounds and patient meetings in a 3DVW. The 3DVW enables students to practice communication with patients and colleagues in a professional manner. To evaluate the course and use of the 3DVW, an online course evaluation was completed by students after they had finished the clinical pharmacy course.

Findings: Forty-two students completed the online course evaluation (62%). Most students (83%) reported that they could adopt the role of a clinical pharmacist in the 3DVW. Sixty percent reported that the environment felt authentic, although some noted that “it can never be quite the same as sitting next to a real person to talk”. More than half of the students (66%) described the use of the 3DVW as a worthwhile exercise. The majority (93%) rated the overall quality of the course as good or very good, with 76% reporting that the pedagogical design of the course helped them with their studies.

Discussion and summary: Students at Umeå University valued the use of 3DVWs in clinical pharmacy teaching. However, there is a need to make the virtual environment more realistic and easier to use. The invaluable feedback gathered from students will help to improve the future use of virtual worlds in pharmacy education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
three-dimensional virtual worlds, clinical pharmacy education, communication
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138464 (URN)10.1016/j.cptl.2017.06.002 (DOI)000413968100023 ()29233320 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Sjölander, M. & Gallego, G. (2017). Where there is no pharmacist: doctors' and nurses' expectations on the implementation of clinical pharmacy services in rural Sweden. Paper presented at 45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5–7 October 2016. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, 39(1), 216-216, Article ID HP-PC011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where there is no pharmacist: doctors' and nurses' expectations on the implementation of clinical pharmacy services in rural Sweden
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 216-216, article id HP-PC011Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132818 (URN)000394437100046 ()
Conference
45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5–7 October 2016
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
de Bruijn, W., Ibanez, C., Frisk, P., Pedersen, H. B., Alkan, A., Bonanno, P. V., . . . Godman, B. (2016). Introduction and Utilization of High Priced HCV Medicines across Europe: Implications for the Future. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 7, Article ID 197.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction and Utilization of High Priced HCV Medicines across Europe: Implications for the Future
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2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 7, article id 197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Infection with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a widespread transmittable disease with a diagnosed prevalence of 2.0%. Fortunately, it is now curable in most patients. Sales of medicines to treat HCV infection grew 2.7% per year between 2004 and 2011, enhanced by the launch of the protease inhibitors (Hs) boceprevir (BCV) and telaprevir (TVR) in addition to ribavirin and pegylated interferon (pegIFN). Costs will continue to rise with new treatments including sofosbuvir, which now include interferon free regimens. Objective: Assess the uptake of BCV and TVR across Europe from a health authority perspective to offer future guidance on dealing with new high cost medicines. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive study of medicines to treat HCV (pegIEN, ribavirin, BCV and TVR) among European countries from 2008 to 2013. Utilization measured in defined daily doses (DDDs)/1000 patients/quarter (DIOs) and expenditure in Euros/DDD. Health authority activities to influence treatments categorized using the 4E methodology (Education, Engineering, Economics and Enforcement). Results: Similar uptake of BCV and TVR among European countries and regions, ranging from 0.5 DIQ in Denmark, Netherlands and Slovenia to 1.5 DIQ in Tayside and Catalonia in 2013. However, different utilization of the new Pls vs. ribavirin indicates differences in dual vs. triple therapy, which is down to factors including physician preference and genotypes. Reimbursed prices for BCV and TVR were comparable across countries. Conclusion: There was reasonable consistency in the utilization of BCV and TVR among European countries in comparison with other high priced medicines. This may reflect the social demand to limit the transmission of HCV. However, the situation is changing with new curative medicines for HCV genotype 1 (GT1) with potentially an appreciable budget impact. These concerns have resulted in different prices across countries, with their impact on budgets and patient outcomes monitored in the future to provide additional guidance.

Keywords
boceprevir, cross national drug utilization study, demand-side measures, Hepatitis C, introduction new medicines, sofosbuvir, telaprevir
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124505 (URN)10.3389/fphar.2016.00197 (DOI)000380093800001 ()27516740 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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