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Nordin, Steven
Publications (10 of 149) Show all publications
Paulin, J., Nordin, M., Nyback, M.-H. & Nordin, S. (2019). Associations between hyperacusis and psychosocial work factors in the general population. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(1), 59-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between hyperacusis and psychosocial work factors in the general population
2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: We investigated the association between hyperacusis and aspects of psychosocial work environment in a general population. The objectives were to investigate (1) prevalence and characteristics (among age, sex, access to social support at home, education, smoking, physical exercise, and perceived general health) of hyperacusis in a general working population and (2) associations between hyperacusis and psychosocial factors in the work environment. The psychosocial work aspects included effort, reward, overcommitment, worry, and social and emotional support.

Methods: Using data from a sample stratified for age and sex from the Österbotten Environmental Health Study in Finland, currently employed participants with self-reported hyperacusis and referents were compared on questionnaire instruments quantifying six aspects of their psychosocial work environment.

Results: Among 856 currently employed participants, 47 constituted a hyperacusis group and 809 a reference group. The hyperacusis group scored significantly higher than the referents on worry at work, social support at work, and reward at work, but not on emotional support at work, work overcommitment, or effort at work. About 40% of the hyperacusis group scored on the upper quartile of the three former work environment factors, with odds ratios ranging from 1.91 to 2.56.

Conclusions: The results suggest that worrying about aspects at work, perceiving low social support, and not perceiving being rewarded at work are associated with hyperacusis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Psychosocial work environment, Effort-reward imbalance, Worry at work, Social support, Emotional support
National Category
Applied Psychology Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155771 (URN)10.1007/s00420-018-1356-x (DOI)000455144300005 ()30194539 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Olaru, G., Wilhelm, O., Nordin, S., Witthöft, M. & Kösteles, F. (2019). Modern health worries: Deriving two measurement invariant short scales for cross-cultural research with Ant Colony Optimization. PLoS ONE, 14(2), 1-16, Article ID e0211819.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modern health worries: Deriving two measurement invariant short scales for cross-cultural research with Ant Colony Optimization
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 1-16, article id e0211819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Worries about possible harmful effects of new technologies (modern health worries) have intensely been investigated in the last decade. However, the comparability of translated self-report measures across countries is often problematic. This study aimed to overcome this problem by developing psychometrically sound brief versions of the widely used 25-item Modern Health Worries Scale (MHWS) suitable for multi-country use. Based on data of overall 5,176 individuals from four European countries (England, Germany, Hungary, Sweden), Ant Colony Optimization was used to identify the indicators that optimize model fit and measurement invariance across countries. Two scales were developed. A short (12-item) version of the MHWS that represents the four-factor structure of the original version and an ultra-short (4-item) scale that only measures the general construct. Both scales show that overall levels of health worries were highest in England and Hungary, but that the main reason for concern (e.g. electromagnetic radiation or food related fears) differs considerably between these countries. This study also shows that even if measurement invariance of translated self-report instruments across countries is problematic, it can be optimized by using adequate item selection procedures. Differences of modern health worries across countries and recommendations for cross-cultural research are discussed.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157656 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0211819 (DOI)000458026000063 ()30730928 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-27 Created: 2019-03-27 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Ekström, I., Josefsson, M., Larsson, M., Rönnlund, M., Nordin, S. & Olofsson, J. K. (2019). Subjective olfactory loss in older adults concurs with long-term odor identification decline. Chemical Senses, 44(2), 105-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective olfactory loss in older adults concurs with long-term odor identification decline
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2019 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Olfactory impairments may provide early indications of future health outcomes in older adults. Thus, an important question concerns whether these impairments can be self-assessed. Previous findings of cross-sectional studies indicate low correlations between self-reported olfactory function and objective olfactory performance. On the other hand, subjective olfactory impairments predict future dementia and mortality in longitudinal settings. No previous study has assessed the relationship between subjectively and objectively measured decline in olfaction over time. Based on data for 903 older adults derived from the Betula Study, a Swedish population-based prospective study, we tested whether rate-of-change in odor identification could be predicted from subjective olfactory decline over a time span of 10 years during which subjective and objective odor functions were assessed on 2 or 3 test occasions. Indeed, we found that participants who experienced subjective olfactory decline over the study period also had significantly steeper rates of decline in odor identification, even after adjusting for demographic, cognitive, and genetic factors that previously have been associated with performance in odor identification. This association was, however, not present in a subsample with baseline cognitive impairment. We interpret these results as evidence that when asked about whether they have an olfactory impairment or not, older persons are assessing intraindividual olfactory changes, rather than interindividual differences. Our results indicate that subjective olfactory loss reflects objective olfactory decline in cognitively intact older adults. This association might be harnessed to predict health outcomes and highlights the need to develop effective olfactory self-assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
decline, longitudinal studies, odor identification, self-reported olfaction, smell, subjective
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157657 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjy079 (DOI)000461508600004 ()30544138 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-27 Created: 2019-03-27 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Näslund, U., Ng, N., Lundgren, A., Fhärm, E., Grönlund, C., Johansson, H., . . . Norberg, M. (2019). Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA): a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial. The Lancet, 393(10167), 133-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA): a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 393, no 10167, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease often fails because of poor adherence among practitioners and individuals to prevention guidelines. We aimed to investigate whether ultrasound-based pictorial information about subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, targeting both primary care physicians and individuals, improves prevention.

METHODS: Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA) is a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial that was integrated within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, an ongoing population-based cardiovascular disease prevention programme in northern Sweden. Individuals aged 40, 50, or 60 years with one or more conventional risk factors were eligible to participate. Participants underwent clinical examination, blood sampling, and ultrasound assessment of carotid intima media wall thickness and plaque formation. Participants were randomly assigned 1:1 with a computer-generated randomisation list to an intervention group (pictorial representation of carotid ultrasound plus a nurse phone call to confirm understanding) or a control group (not informed). The primary outcomes, Framingham risk score (FRS) and European systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE), were assessed after 1 year among participants who were followed up. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01849575.

FINDINGS: 3532 individuals were enrolled between April 29, 2013, and June 7, 2016, of which 1783 were randomly assigned to the control group and 1749 were assigned to the intervention group. 3175 participants completed the 1-year follow-up. At the 1-year follow-up, FRS and SCORE differed significantly between groups (FRS 1·07 [95% CI 0·11 to 2·03, p=0·0017] and SCORE 0·16 [0·02 to 0·30, p=0·0010]). FRS decreased from baseline to the 1-year follow-up in the intervention group and increased in the control group (-0·58 [95% CI -0·86 to -0·30] vs 0·35 [0·08 to 0·63]). SCORE increased in both groups (0·13 [95% CI 0·09 to 0·18] vs 0·27 [0·23 to 0·30]).

INTERPRETATION: This study provides evidence of the contributory role of pictorial presentation of silent atherosclerosis for prevention of cardiovascular disease. It supports further development of methods to reduce the major problem of low adherence to medication and lifestyle modification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154318 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32818-6 (DOI)000455437100026 ()30522919 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, Dnr ALFVLL-298001Swedish Research Council, Dnr 521-2013-2708Swedish Research Council, 2016-01891Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, Dnr 20150369Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20170481
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Karvala, K., Sainio, M., Palmquist, E., Claeson, A.-S., Nyback, M.-H. & Nordin, S. (2018). Building-Related Environmental Intolerance and Associated Health in the General Population. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(9), Article ID 2047.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building-Related Environmental Intolerance and Associated Health in the General Population
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 2047Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People frequently attribute adverse symptoms to particular buildings when exposure to pollutants is low, within nonhazardous levels. Our aim was to characterize building-related intolerance (BRI) in the general population. Data were derived from two population-based questionnaire surveys, the Vasterbotten and osterbotten Environmental Health Study. We identified cases of BRI if respondents reported symptoms emerging from residing in certain buildings, when most other people had none. The questionnaires covered lifestyle factors, perceived general health, BRI duration and symptom frequency, the emotional and behavioral impact of BRI, coping strategies, and physician-diagnosed diseases. From the total of 4941 participants, we formed two case groups, 275 (5.6%) fulfilled criteria for self-reported BRI, and 123 (2.5%) for BRI with wide-ranging symptoms. Individuals in both case groups were significantly more often female, single, and perceived their general health as poorer than the referents, i.e., those reporting no BRI symptoms. The mean duration of BRI was 12 years. In both case groups, avoidance behavior was found in over 60%, and nearly half of the sample had sought medical care. BRI with wide-ranging symptoms was associated with elevated odds for all studied comorbidities (somatic and psychiatric diseases and functional somatic syndromes). The perceived health of individuals with BRI is poorer and comorbidities are more frequent than among referents. BRI seems to be similar to other environmental intolerances and shares features with functional somatic syndromes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
environmental intolerance, building-related intolerance, sick-building syndrome, asthma, functional somatic syndrome
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152897 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15092047 (DOI)000445765600256 ()30235805 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Gruber, M., Palmquist, E. & Nordin, S. (2018). Characteristics of perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity in the general population. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 59(4), 422-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity in the general population
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Health problems evoked in the presence of electrical equipment is a concern, calling for better understanding for characteristics of electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) in the general population. The present study investigated demographics, lifestyle factors, frequency and duration, coping strategies, proportion meeting clinical criteria for intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and comorbidity. Using data from a large-scale population-based questionnaire study, we investigated persons with self-reported (n=91) EHS in comparison to referents (n=3,250). Middle age, female sex and poor perceived health was found to be associated with EHS. More than 50% in the EHS group reported having EMF-related symptoms more often than once a week, and the mean number of years experiencing EHS was 10.5. More than half of the EHS group reported that their symptoms started after a high-dose or long-term EMF exposure, that they actively tried to avoid EMF sources and that they mostly could affect the EMF environment. A minority of the EHS group had sought medical attention, been diagnosed by a physician or received treatment. Exhaustion syndrome, anxiety disorder, back/joint/muscle disorder, depression, functional somatic syndrome and migraine were comorbid with EHS. The results provide ground for future study of these characteristic features being risk factors for development of EHS and or consequences of EHS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Electromagnetic hypersensitivity, functional somatic syndrome, environmental intolerance, prevalence, lifestyle factors, coping strategies
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150661 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12449 (DOI)000437295200008 ()29741795 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047489078 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Andersson, H., Wikdahl, F., Nyback, M.-H. & Nordin, S. (2018). Comorbidity of Airway Inflammatory Diseases in Chemical and Building-Related Intolerance. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 60(4), 295-300
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity of Airway Inflammatory Diseases in Chemical and Building-Related Intolerance
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study investigated comorbidity in chemical intolerance (CI) and building- related intolerance (BRI) with (i) chronic sinusitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, allergic and nonallergic asthma and allergic rhinitis, and (ii) airway inflammatory symptoms. Methods: Data from two population-based questionnaire surveys, the Västerbotten and Österbotten Environmental Health Studies, were used. The participants were categorized as CI or BRI and referents, and binary logistic regression analysis was applied. Results: Prevalence rates for the case groups were 7.2% to 40.0% for diseases and 24.3% to 68.9% for symptoms, whereas adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 3.4 to 26.1 for diseases and 3.3 to 17.0 for symptoms, all being significantly higher than unity. Prevalence rates and ORs were in general higher in BRI than in CI. Conclusion: Inflammatory airway diseases and symptoms are associated with CI and BRI, which encourages further research regarding underlying mechanisms and treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
airway inflammation, allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, building-related intolerance, chemical tolerance, chronic sinusitis, COPD, nonallergic asthma
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147328 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000001249 (DOI)000429441900011 ()29227362 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Sandberg, P., Olofsson, J. K. & Nordin, S. (2018). Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses. Chemical Senses, 43(2), 129-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses
2018 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A widely held view is that top-down modulation of sensory information relies on an amodal control network that acts through the thalamus to regulate incoming signals. Olfaction lacks a direct thalamic projection, which suggests that it may differ from other modalities in this regard. We investigated the late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) from 28 participants, elicited by intensity-matched olfactory, auditory and visual stimuli, during a condition of focused attention, a neutral condition, and a condition in which stimuli were to be actively ignored. Amplitudes were largest during the attend condition, lowest during the ignore condition, with the neutral condition in between. A Bayesian analysis resulted in strong evidence for similar effects of task across sensory modalities. We conclude that olfaction, despite its unique neural projections, does not differ from audition and vision in terms of task-dependent neural modulation of the LPC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
attention, audition, electrophysiology, late positive complex, olfaction, vision
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145156 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjx082 (DOI)000424225200007 ()29325013 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ståhlberg, L., Palmquist, E. & Nordin, S. (2018). Intolerance to environmental chemicals and sounds in irritable bowel syndrome: explained by central sensitization?. Journal of Health Psychology, 23(10), 1367-1377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intolerance to environmental chemicals and sounds in irritable bowel syndrome: explained by central sensitization?
2018 (English)In: Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-1053, E-ISSN 1461-7277, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1367-1377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tested the hypotheses of irritable bowel syndrome showing (1) comorbidity with chemical and sound intolerance, other types of functionally somatic syndromes, and psychiatric disorders and (2) stronger than normal affective reactions to and behavioral disruptions from odorous/pungent chemicals and sounds in daily life. These hypotheses were tested by means of data from a large-scale population-based questionnaire study. The results showed comorbidity in irritable bowel syndrome with chemical and sound intolerance, fibromyalgia, migraine, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic syndrome, and depression as well as strong reactions/disruptions from odorous/pungent chemicals and sounds in irritable bowel syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
adults, anxiety, depression, functional somatic syndrome, psychological distress, public health psychology
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151383 (URN)10.1177/1359105316656242 (DOI)000441982100011 ()27387510 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, 2012030-KForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0396Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375: 1
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Palmquist, E. & Nordin, S. (2018). Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance. International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), 221(3), 586-592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance
2018 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 221, no 3, p. 586-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents.

Methods: Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI.

Results: All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors.

Conclusions: The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Chemical intolerance, Building related intolerance, Sound intolerance, Electromagnetic hypersensitivity, Environmental risk factors, Environmental-symptom attribution scale
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151178 (URN)10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.02.009 (DOI)000438327900024 ()29523399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042857593 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
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