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Janlert, Urban
Publications (10 of 81) Show all publications
Boman, J., Lindqvist, H., Forsberg, L., Janlert, U., Granåsen, G. & Nylander, E. (2018). Brief manual-based single-session Motivational Interviewing for reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women: an evaluation. International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), 29(4), 396-403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brief manual-based single-session Motivational Interviewing for reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women: an evaluation
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 396-403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate brief Motivational Interviewing (MI) to facilitate behaviour change in women at high risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One hundred and seventy-three women (mean age 24.7) at high risk of contracting STIs were randomized to a brief risk-reducing MI counselling intervention (n = 74) or assigned to the control group (n = 99). MI skill was assessed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Coding System. Seventeen of 74 (23%) women tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in the MI intervention group and 22 of 99 (22%) in the control group had a genital CT infection 0-24 months before baseline. All additional CT testing was monitored up to 24 months for all 173 women in the study. None of the 49 CT-retested women in the MI group was CT infected, as compared to 3 of 72 (4%) women in the control group. A generalized estimating equations model with sexual high-risk behaviour measured at baseline and at six-month follow-up produced an adjusted estimated odds ratio of 0.38 (95% confidence interval = 0.158, 0.909), indicating efficacy. Brief manual-based single-session MI counselling seems to be effective in reducing high-risk sexual behaviour in women at high risk of acquiring STIs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Chlamydia trachomatis, Europe, Motivational Interviewing, high-risk behaviour, prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Immunology in the medical area Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143247 (URN)10.1177/0956462417729308 (DOI)000424648100012 ()28920542 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Janlert, U. & Nylander, E. (2017). Hyperhidrosis – Sweating Sites Matter: Quality of Life in Primary Hyperhidrosis according to the Sweating Sites Measured by SF-36. Dermatology, 233(6), 441-445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperhidrosis – Sweating Sites Matter: Quality of Life in Primary Hyperhidrosis according to the Sweating Sites Measured by SF-36
2017 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 233, no 6, p. 441-445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Primary hyperhidrosis has negative impacts on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the impacts of primary hyperhidrosis on quality of life are different depending on the localisation of the sweating.

METHOD: We compiled background data, Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS), and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) post hoc results from 2 previous studies. Cases who described only 1 site as their most problematic area of sweating were included (n = 160/188) while individuals with multifocal primary sites of hyperhidrosis were excluded (n = 28/188).

RESULTS: Individuals included were 11-62 years old with a mean age of 30.2 ± 10.4 years, and axillary hyperhidrosis (65.6%) was the most common type of hyperhidrosis. Comorbidities were more common when hyperhidrosis was reported in other than the axillary, palmar, and plantar regions. Excluding comorbidities showed the lowest SF-36 mental component summary scores for axillary (41.6 ± 11.6), palmar (40.0 ± 9.4), and plantar hyperhidrosis (41.1 ± 13.7). The HDSS showed the highest proportion of severe cases in axillary (60.6%) and palmar (51.5%) hyperhidrosis (p < 0.01) while mild cases were more often observed in plantar (60%), facial (83.3%), and other sites (85.7%) in primary hyperhidrosis (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that impairments in quality of life can be different depending on the manifestation of primary hyperhidrosis on the body. This can have an influence on how patients with hyperhidrosis could be prioritised in health care. Subgroup samples affected by facial hyperhidrosis and other sites of primary hyperhidrosis were however small, and more research is required to verify our findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2017
Keywords
Hyperhidrosis, Quality of life, Survey
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145944 (URN)10.1159/000486713 (DOI)000430505800005 ()29502112 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85043695825 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Norström, F., Janlert, U. & Hammarström, A. (2017). Is unemployment in young adulthood related to self-rated health later in life?: Results from the Northern Swedish cohort. BMC Public Health, 17, Article ID 529.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is unemployment in young adulthood related to self-rated health later in life?: Results from the Northern Swedish cohort
2017 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Many studies have reported that unemployment has a negative effect on health. However, little is known about the long-term effect for those who become unemployed when they are young adults. Our aim was to examine how unemployment is related to long-term self-rated health among 30 year olds, with an emphasis on how health differs in relation to education level, marital status, previous health, occupation, and gender.

METHODS: In the Northern Swedish Cohort, 1083 teenagers (~16 years old) were originally invited in 1981. Of these, 1001 participated in the follow-up surveys in 1995 and 2007. In our study, we included participants with either self-reported unemployment or activity in the labor force during the previous three years in the 1995 follow-up so long as they had no self-reported unemployment between the follow-up surveys. Labor market status was studied in relation to self-reported health in the 2007 follow-up. Information from the 1995 follow-up for education level, marital status, self-reported health, and occupation were part of the statistical analyses. Analyses were stratified for these variables and for gender. Analyses were performed with logistic regression, G-computation, and a method based on propensity scores.

RESULTS: Poor self-rated health in 2007 was reported among 43 of the 98 (44%) unemployed and 159 (30%) of the 522 employed subjects. Unemployment had a long-term negative effect on health (odds ratio with logistic regression 1.74 and absolute difference estimates of 0.11 (G-computation) and 0.10 (propensity score method)). At the group level, the most pronounced effects on health were seen in those with upper secondary school as their highest education level, those who were single, low-level white-collar workers, and women.

CONCLUSIONS: Even among those becoming unemployed during young adulthood, unemployment is related to a negative long-term health effect. However, the effect varies among different groups of individuals. Increased emphasis on understanding the groups for whom unemployment is most strongly related to ill health is important for future research so that efforts can be put towards those with the biggest need. Still, our results can be used as the basis for deciding which groups should be prioritized for labor-market interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health; Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135658 (URN)10.1186/s12889-017-4460-z (DOI)000403023700004 ()28558793 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011–0839Swedish Research Council Formas, 259–2012-37
Available from: 2017-06-01 Created: 2017-06-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Virtanen, P., Hammarström, A. & Janlert, U. (2016). Children of boom and recession and the scars to the mental health: a comparative study on the long term effects of youth unemployment. International Journal for Equity in Health, 15, Article ID 14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children of boom and recession and the scars to the mental health: a comparative study on the long term effects of youth unemployment
2016 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Earlier research shows that there is an association between unemployment and poor mental health, and that recovery from the damages to mental health obtained during unemployment remains incomplete over a long period of time. The present study relates this 'mental health scarring' to the trade cycle, exploring if those exposed to youth unemployment during boom differ from those exposed during recession with respect to mental health in the middle age.

METHODS: The sample consists of two cohorts from the same industrial town in Northern Sweden: the cohort born in 1965 and the cohort born in 1973 included all pupils attending the last grade of compulsory school, respectively, in 1981 and in 1989. Their depressiveness and anxiousness were assessed by questionnaires at age 21 and again at age 43/39. Mental health at follow-up was related to exposure to unemployment during age years 21-25. Statistical significance of the cohort*exposure interactions from binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the cohort differences in the mental health between Cohort65 and Cohort73, entering the labour market, respectively, during a boom and a recession.

RESULTS: Compared to the unexposed, high exposure to unemployment at the age from 21 to 25 was associated to increased probability of poor mental health in the middle age in both in Cohort65 (odds ratio 2.19 [1.46-3.30] for anxiousness and 1.85 [1.25-2.74]for depressiveness) and in Cohort73 (odds ratio 2.13 [1.33-3.39] for anxiousness and 1.38 [0.89-2.14] for depressiveness). The differences between the cohorts also turned out as statistically non-significant.

CONCLUSIONS: The scars of unemployment exposure onto future health seem to be rather insensitive to economic trades. Thus, at the population level this would mean that the long-term health costs that can be attributed to youth unemployment are more widespread in the generation that suffers of recession around the entry to the work life.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127466 (URN)10.1186/s12939-016-0305-0 (DOI)000368796500004 ()26792092 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Janlert, U., Brulin, C., Boman, J. & Nylander, E. (2016). Prevalence and Characteristics of Hyperhidrosis in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study in the General Population. Dermatology, 232(5), 586-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and Characteristics of Hyperhidrosis in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study in the General Population
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2016 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 232, no 5, p. 586-591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating which can be primary or secondary. Data about the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis are scarce for northern Europe.

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of hyperhidrosis focusing on its primary form and describe the quality of life impairments for the affected individuals.

METHODS: Five thousand random individuals aged 18-60 years in Sweden were investigated. The individuals' addresses were obtained from Statens personadressregister, SPAR, which includes all persons who are registered as resident in Sweden. A validated questionnaire regarding hyperhidrosis including the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) and 36-item Short Form (SF-36) health survey was sent to each individual. The participants were asked to return the coded questionnaire within 1 week.

RESULTS: A total of 1,353 individuals (564 male, 747 female and 42 with unspecified gender) with a mean age of 43.1 ± 11.2 years responded. The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis was 5.5%, and severe primary hyperhidrosis (HDSS 3-4 points) occurred in 1.4%. Secondary hyperhidrosis was observed in 14.8% of the participants. Our SF-36 results showed that secondary hyperhidrosis causes a significant (p < 0.001) impairment of both mental and physical abilities while primary hyperhidrosis impairs primarily the mental health (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Hyperhidrosis affects individuals in adolescence as a focal form while occurring as a generalised form with increasing age. Further, the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis described in our study is comparable to other studies from the western hemisphere. While secondary, generalised hyperhidrosis impairs both physical and mental aspects of life, primary hyperhidrosis, with the exception of severe cases, mainly affects the mental health.

Keywords
Hyperhidrosis, Prevalence, Survey, Quality of life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127514 (URN)10.1159/000448032 (DOI)000392167200009 ()27576462 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shayesteh, A., Boman, J., Janlert, U., Brulin, C. & Nylander, E. (2016). Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin. Journal of dermatology (Print), 43(8), 928-933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin
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2016 (English)In: Journal of dermatology (Print), ISSN 0385-2407, E-ISSN 1346-8138, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 928-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients.

Keywords
alcohol, botulinum toxin, hyperhidrosis, quality of life, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118031 (URN)10.1111/1346-8138.13291 (DOI)000380922800010 ()26875781 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waller, G., Janlert, U., Norberg, M., Lundqvist, R. & Forssen, A. (2016). Self-Rated Health and Standard Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction: A Cohort Study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 85, 87-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Rated Health and Standard Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction: A Cohort Study
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 87-88Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123990 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.03.218 (DOI)000377627200101 ()
Note

Meeting Abstract: 92

Available from: 2016-08-19 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Virtanen, P., Lintonen, T., Westerlund, H., Nummi, T., Janlert, U. & Hammarström, A. (2016). Unemployment in the teens and trajectories of alcohol consumption in adulthood. BMJ Open, 6(3), Article ID e006430.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unemployment in the teens and trajectories of alcohol consumption in adulthood
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2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 3, article id e006430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives The unemployed are assumed to adopt unhealthy behaviours, including harmful use of alcohol. This study sought to elucidate the relations between unemployment before age 21years and consumption of alcohol from 21 to 42years. The design was based on the conception of youth as a sensitive period for obtaining drinking scars' that are visible up to middle age.

Setting The Northern Swedish Cohort Study has followed up a population sample from 1981 to 2007 with five surveys.

Participants All pupils (n=1083) attending the last year of compulsory school in Lulea participated in the baseline survey in classrooms, and 1010 of them (522 men and 488 women) participated in the last follow-up survey that was conducted at classmate reunions or by post or by phone.

Outcome measure The trajectory of alcohol consumption from 21 to 43years, obtained with latent class growth analyses, was scaled.

Results Men were assigned to five and women to three consumption trajectories. The trajectory membership was regressed on accumulation of unemployment from 16 to 21years, with multinomial logistic regression analyses. The trajectory of moderate consumption was preceded by lowest exposure to unemployment in men and in women. With reference to this, the relative risk ratios for high-level trajectory groups were 3.49 (1.25 to 9.79) in men and 1.41 (0.74 to 2.72) in women, but also the trajectories of low-level consumption were more probable (relative risk ratio 3.18 (1.12 to 9.02) in men and 2.41 (1.24 to 4.67) in women).

Conclusions High-level alcohol consumption throughout adulthood is, particularly among men, partly due to scars' from youth unemployment, particularly in men, but there are also groups of men and women where unemployment in the teens predicts a trajectory of low consumption.

Keywords
youth unemployment, population cohort, alcohol consumption, trajectory analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120368 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006430 (DOI)000374052300001 ()27016242 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-16 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waller, G., Janlert, U., Hamberg, K. & Forssén, A. (2016). What does age-comparative self-rated health measure?: A cross-sectional study from the Northern Sweden MONICA Project. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(3), 233-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What does age-comparative self-rated health measure?: A cross-sectional study from the Northern Sweden MONICA Project
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 233-239Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Self-rated health comprehensively accounts for many health domains. Using self-ratings and a knowledge of associations with health domains might help personnel in the health care sector to understand reports of ill health. The aim of this paper was to investigate associations between age-comparative self-rated health and disease, risk factors, emotions and psychosocial factors in a general population. Methods: We based our study on population-based cross-sectional surveys performed in 1999, 2004 and 2009 in northern Sweden. Participants were 25-74 years of age and 5314 of the 7500 people invited completed the survey. Comparative self-rated health was measured on a three-grade ordinal scale by the question How would you assess your general health condition compared to persons of your own age?' with the alternatives better', worse' or similar'. The independent variables were sex, age, blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index, self-reported myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, physical activity, smoking, risk of unemployment, satisfaction with economic situation, anxiety and depressive emotions, education and Karasek scale of working conditions. Odds ratios using ordinal regression were calculated. Results: Age, sex, stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetes, body mass index, physical activity, economic satisfaction, anxiety and depressive emotions were associated with comparative self-rated health. The risk of unemployment, a tense work situation and educational level were also associated with comparative self-rated health, although they were considerably weaker when adjusted for the the other variables. Anxiety, depressive emotions, low economic satisfaction and a tense work situation were common in the population. Conclusions:Emotions and economic satisfaction were associated with comparative self-rated health as well as some medical variables. Utilization of the knowledge of these associations in health care should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
cardiovascular disease, comparative self-rated health, diabetes, emotions, ordinal regression analysis, population based study, psychosocial factors, risk factors
National Category
General Practice
Research subject
Family Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109147 (URN)10.1177/1403494815618554 (DOI)000373591600003 ()26644159 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-09-21 Created: 2015-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Janlert, U., Winefield, A. H. & Hammarström, A. (2015). Length of unemployment and health-related outcomes: a life-course analysis. European Journal of Public Health, 25(4), 662-667
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Length of unemployment and health-related outcomes: a life-course analysis
2015 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 662-667Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Most previous studies on the effects of length of unemployment on health have focused on the duration of continuous spells of unemployment rather than on the cumulative length of intermittent spells. This study analysed the relationship between the cumulative length of intermittent spells of unemployment and different health-related outcomes using data from a longitudinal study of school leavers. Methods: All pupils who completed compulsory schooling in 1981 in a medium-sized town in northern Sweden (N=1083) were followed for 14 years with repeated questionnaires including questions about unemployment, health and health behaviour. Results: Men tended to react with a steady state or a levelling off of health symptoms with increased unemployment, whereas women showed deteriorating health symptoms. For health behaviour the reverse occurred. Women's health behaviour was less connected with increased unemployment while men's health behaviour tended to deteriorate. Conclusion: Cumulative length of unemployment is correlated with deteriorated health and health behaviour. Long-term unemployment, even as a result of cumulated shorter employment spells over a number of years should be an urgent target for policy makers.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107854 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cku186 (DOI)000359159900024 ()25417939 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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