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Namatovu, Fredinah, PhDORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5471-9043
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Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Namatovu, F., Häggström Lundevaller, E., Vikström, L. & Ng, N. (2020). Adverse perinatal conditions and receiving a disability pension early in life. PLoS ONE, Article ID e0229285.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse perinatal conditions and receiving a disability pension early in life
2020 (English)In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, article id e0229285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The number of young adults on disability pension (DP) is increasing in European countries, creating a need to understand the related risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether adverse perinatal conditions are associated with receiving a DP early in life.

Methods: This longitudinal cohort study consisted of all persons (N = 453,223) born in Sweden during 1973–1977, observed from 1991 through 2010 when they were aged between 16 and 37 years. Statistics Sweden provided linked national data on the children and their parents. We used logistic regression to assess the association between perinatal health conditions (birth defect, Apgar score, and small for gestational age) and receiving a DP, adjusting for maternal education and the sex of the child.

Results: New recipients of DP were significantly more likely to have had a birth defect (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.74, 95% CI: 2.49–3.00), to have had low Apgar score (AOR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.77–2.52), to have been small for gestational age (AOR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.54–1.94) and to be females (AOR 1.55, 95% CI: 1.46–1.64). Higher maternal education was associated with lower odds of receiving a DP (AOR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.69–0.79) for those with high school education and (AOR 0.67, 95% CI: 0.59–0.75) for those with university education. Age-stratified analysis confirmed increased odds of receiving a DP among those with birth defects and small for gestational age, but this effect reduced with increasing age. Apgar score was significantly associated with starting to receive a DP at ages 16–18 and 19–29, but not at ages 30–33. Women had lower odds of receiving a DP at ages 16–18 (AOR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.64–0.85); however, this reversed from age 19 and upwards (AOR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.41–1.67) and (AOR 2.16, 95% CI: 1.95–2.40) for the age groups of 19–29 and 30–33, respectively. Persons with high maternal education were less likely to receive a DP regardless of age at receiving a DP.

Conclusion: Having a birth defect was the strongest indicator of receiving a DP during early adulthood, followed by small for gestational age and low Apgar score. Overall, the effects of the studied perinatal health conditions were pronounced in those who received a DP at 16–18 years, but this effect weakened with increasing age at receiving a DP. Our findings suggest that policies and programs geared at promoting optimal health at birth might contribute to a reduction in receiving a DP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLOS, 2020
Keywords
perinatal conditions, disability pension, disability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168471 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0229285 (DOI)
Projects
DISMAW
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0141
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-05-13
Sandström, G., Namatovu, F., Ineland, J., Larsson, D., Ng, N. & Stattin, M. (2020). The Persistence of High Levels of Living Alone Among Adults with Disabilities in Sweden, 1993–2011. Population: Research and Policy Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Persistence of High Levels of Living Alone Among Adults with Disabilities in Sweden, 1993–2011
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2020 (English)In: Population: Research and Policy Review, ISSN 0167-5923, E-ISSN 1573-7829Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how the probability to live alone has developed among working age individuals with and without disabilities in Sweden during the period 1993–2011 when extensive political reforms to improve the integration of disabled individuals in society were implemented. The results show that individuals with disabilities are approximately twice as likely to be living alone when compared to individuals without disabilities. People with disabilities were also more likely to report low life satisfaction, and this was especially true among individuals with disabilities living alone. Men and women with disabilities also tend to experience longer periods of living as a one-person household than non-disabled people. Over time we find no indications of reduced differences in family outcomes between disabled and non-disabled individuals but rather evidence to the contrary. These differences are interpreted as being the result of the disadvantage disabled individual’s experience in the partner market and that people with disabilities are less successful in forming partnerships that can lead to cohabitation and family formation. The results thus show how disabled individuals still face societal barriers that limit their possibilities to find and sustain relationships that result in stable cohabitation despite increased efforts to improve their inclusion in Swedish society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Sweden, Disability, Living arrangements, One-person households, Disability legislation
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167923 (URN)10.1007/s11113-020-09570-2 (DOI)000515863100001 ()2-s2.0-85079501680 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DISMAW
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0141
Available from: 2020-02-06 Created: 2020-02-06 Last updated: 2020-05-19
Baroudi, M., Petersen, S., Namatovu, F., Annelie, C., Ivarsson, A. & Norström, F. (2019). Preteen children’s health related quality of life in Sweden: changes over time and disparities between different sociodemographic groups. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 139.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preteen children’s health related quality of life in Sweden: changes over time and disparities between different sociodemographic groups
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Assessing disparities in health-related quality of Life (HRQoL) is important as a part of health-related disparities in the society. The aim of this study was to explore HRQoL among 12-year-olds in Sweden in terms of differences between years 2005 and 2009 and disparities related to sociodemographic background.

Methods: During the school years 2005 and 2009, a total of 18,325 sixth grade students in Sweden were invited to a celiac disease screening study; 13,279 agreed to participate. Jointly with the celiac screening, the children answered a questionnaire that included EuroQol 5 Dimensions-youth (EQ-5D-Y) and their parents responded to separate questionnaires about their own and their child’s country of birth, family structure, their employment status, occupation, and education. In total 11,009 child-parent questionnaires were collected. Logistic regression was used to study differences in HRQoL between 2005 and 2009, and between various sociodemographic subgroups.

Results: Compared with 2005, children in 2009 reported more pain (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.1–1.3) and more mood problems (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.2–1.5). In general, girls reported more pain and mood problems and had more disparities than boys. There were no significant differences based on parents’ occupation, however, children of parents with low or medium education levels reported less “mood problems” than those of parents with high education levels (OR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92) and (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.73–0.96), respectively. A slight variation was seen in HRQoL between children with different migration background. Girls living in small municipalities reported more pain (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.14–2.01), and problems performing usual activities (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 2.08–6.84), compared to girls living in large municipalities. In addition, children living with two parents had less mood problems than children living in other family constellations.

Conclusion: More children reported pain and mood problems in 2009 compared with 2005. To study future trends, health outcomes among children in Sweden should continue to be reported periodically. More efforts should be invested to increase the awareness of health-related disparities as highlighted in this study especially for girls living in small municipalities and children of parents with high education level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Preteen children health, Health inequity, Quality of life, HRQoL, Sociodemographic disparities
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155944 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6429-6 (DOI)000457471800001 ()30704442 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2004-7093Swedish Research Council, 521-2007-2953Swedish Research Council Formas, 222-2004-1918Swedish Research Council Formas, 222-2007-1394
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Vikström, L. (2019). The impact of disability on partnership formation in Sweden during 1990-2009. The History of the Family
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of disability on partnership formation in Sweden during 1990-2009
2019 (English)In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that disability negatively affects people’s propensity to find a partner. Persons with disabilities that eventually find a partner do so later in life compared to the average population. There is a lack of studies on the differences in partnership opportunities for persons with disabilities compared to those without disabilities in Sweden. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of disability on partnership formation and to assess whether partnership formation varies as a function of individual demographic and socio-economic factors. We use nationwide data available in the Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in Social and Medical Sciences (Umeå SIMSAM Lab). We follow persons born from 1973 to 1977 when they were from 16 to 37 years of age and analyze their data using logistic regression. Our findings indicate that regardless of whether a person started to receive a disability pension at an early age or later, it was associated with lower odds for partnership formation. For persons who started receiving disability pension from 16 to 20 years of age, chances for partnership formation reduced with increase in age of partnership. Individuals that started to receive disability pension later were more likely to form partnership prior to receiving disability pension. Partnership formation was less likely among persons born outside Sweden, in persons with mothers born outside Sweden, in individuals born by unmarried mothers and in persons, whose mothers had a high level of education. Partnership was high among women and among persons who had many maternal siblings. In conclusion, receiving disability pension was associated with reduced chances for partnership formation. Receiving disability pension might imply financial constraints that negatively influence partnership formation supporting Oppenheimer’s theory on the economic cost of marriage and the uncertainty hypothesis.

Keywords
Cohabit, cohabitation, disability, early retirement pension, family union, marriage, marry, union formation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165907 (URN)10.1080/1081602X.2019.1692054 (DOI)000500674500001 ()
Projects
MAW Experiences of Disabilities in Life and Online: Life Course Perspectives on Disabled People from Past Society to Present
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 647125Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0141
Available from: 2019-12-05 Created: 2019-12-05 Last updated: 2020-04-23
Namatovu, F., Strandh, M., Ivarsson, A. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 103(2), 143-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study
2018 (English)In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coeliac disease might affect school performance due to its effect on cognitive performance and related health consequences that might increase school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with coeliac disease performed differently on completion of ninth grade in school compared with children without coeliac disease.

Methods: Analysis was performed on a population of 445 669 children born in Sweden between 1991 and 1994 of whom 1767 were diagnosed with coeliac disease. School performance at ninth grade was the outcome and coeliac disease was the exposure. Other covariates included sex, Apgar score at 5 min, small for gestational age, year of birth, family type, parental education and income.

Results: There was no association between coeliac disease and school performance at ninth grade (adjusted coefficient -2.4, 95% CI 5.1 to 0.4). A weak association was established between late coeliac diagnosis and higher grades, but this disappeared after adjusting for parent socioeconomic conditions. Being small for gestational age affected performance negatively (adjusted coefficient -6.9, 95% CI 8.0 to 5.7). Grade scores were significantly lower in children living with a single parent (adjusted coefficient -20.6, 95% CI 20.9 to 20.2), compared with those with married/cohabiting parents. A positive association was found between scores at ninth grade and parental education and income.

Conclusion: Coeliac disease diagnosis during childhood is not associated with poor school performance at ninth grade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
achievement, celiac, disease, education, grades, income, performance and school
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139901 (URN)10.1136/archdischild-2017-312830 (DOI)000424019400011 ()28844065 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F., Preet, R. & Goicolea, I. (2018). Gender-based violence among people with disabilities is a neglected public health topic. Global Health Action, 11, 97-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender-based violence among people with disabilities is a neglected public health topic
2018 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, p. 97-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to provide an analytical insight on the current state of knowledge on gender-based violence among people with disabilities, a topic where the level of data is relatively low. We briefly discuss the current research on: (a) the prevalence, risk factors and the theoretical approaches for gender-based violence among people with disabilities. (b) Service provision among people with disabilities who experience gender-based violence. (c) We also highlight areas where further research is required, the applicable theoretical approaches and provide an example on how Sweden is attempting to bridge this knowledge gap through implementing the Disability and Intimate-partner violence project (DIS-IPV) project

Keywords
Gender-based violence, disability, service provision
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165975 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1694758 (DOI)31777318 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075748162 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DIS-IPV
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, STYB-2019/0005
Available from: 2019-12-05 Created: 2019-12-05 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Wagman, J. A., Gray, R. H., Nakyanjo, N., McClendon, K. A., Bonnevie, E., Namatovu, F., . . . Nalugoda, F. (2018). Process evaluation of the SHARE intervention for preventing intimate partner violence and HIV infection in Rakai, Uganda. Evaluation and Program Planning, 67, 129-137
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process evaluation of the SHARE intervention for preventing intimate partner violence and HIV infection in Rakai, Uganda
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2018 (English)In: Evaluation and Program Planning, ISSN 0149-7189, E-ISSN 1873-7870, Vol. 67, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Safe Homes And Respect for Everyone (SHARE) intervention introduced an intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention approach into Rakai Health Sciences Program, an established HIV research and service organization in Uganda. A trial found exposure to SHARE was associated with reductions in IPV and HIV incidence. This mixed methods process evaluation was conducted between August 2007 and December 2009, with people living in SHARE intervention clusters, to assess awareness about/participation in SHARE, motivators and barriers to involvement, and perceptions of how SHARE contributed to behavior change. Surveys were conducted with 1407 Rakai Community Cohort Study participants. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 key informants. Most (77%) were aware of SHARE, among whom 73% participated in intervention activities. Two-thirds of those who participated in SHARE felt it influenced behavior change related to IPV. While some felt confident to take part in new IPV-focused activities of a well-established program, others were suspicious of SHARE's motivations, implying awareness raising is critical. Many activities appealed to the majority (e.g., community drama) while interest in some activities was limited to men (e.g., film shows), suggesting multiple intervention components is ideal for wide-reaching programming. The SHARE model offers a promising, acceptable approach for integrating IPV prevention into HIV and other established health programs in sub-Saharan Africa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Process evaluation, SHARE intervention, Intimate partner violence, HIV infection, Mixed methods, kai, Uganda
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146560 (URN)10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2017.12.009 (DOI)000428097000016 ()29310019 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
King, E. J., Maman, S., Namatovu, F., Kiwanuka, D., Kairania, R., Ssemanda, J. B., . . . Wagman, J. A. (2017). Addressing intimate partner violence among female clients accessing HIV testing and counseling services: pilot testing tools in Rakai, Uganda. Violence against Women, 23(13), 1656-1668
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing intimate partner violence among female clients accessing HIV testing and counseling services: pilot testing tools in Rakai, Uganda
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2017 (English)In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 23, no 13, p. 1656-1668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The World Health Organization recommends that HIV counseling and testing (HCT) programs implement strategies to address how intimate partner violence (IPV) influences women's ability to protect themselves from and seek care and treatment for HIV infection. We discuss the process used to adapt a screening and brief intervention (SBI) for female clients of HCT services in Rakai, Uganda-a setting with high prevalence of both HIV and IPV. By outlining our collaborative process for adapting and implementing the SBI in Rakai and training counselors for its use, we hope other HCT programs will consider replicating the approach in their settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
HIV testing and counseling, intimate partner violence, Uganda
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127488 (URN)10.1177/1077801216663657 (DOI)000412911900006 ()27586170 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F. N. (2017). Disability and family formation. Paper presented at 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl_3), 352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability and family formation
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 352-Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have investigated family formation among people with disabilities. Available evidence on disability and family formation shows people with disabilities to have a low propensity of finding a life partner. Being married or cohabiting has been associated with improved health in children. There is a general lack of investigations on how family formation among people with disability has changed in recent decades. Important to note, there is scanty of evidence of how the situation of disability and family formation looks like in Sweden today.

Methods: Using Swedish national register data obtained from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab, the study applies statistical life course techniques such as Cox regression and sequence analysis to identify factors affecting the relationship between disability and family formation. We follow the life courses of persons with disability born in 1973-1977 up to when they are aged 16-37 years, which is in 1990 and 2010. The selected age interval represents the time when crucial transitioning often takes place i.e. transition into education, independent living, work and family formation. Disability based on having received early retirement pension during the follow-up period.

Results: Out of 700000 individuals born during 1973-1977, the study shows differences in partnership chances for people with disability and not.

Conclusions: There is need for further investigations on why people with work related disability have lower rates of cohabitation and marriage compared to the general population.

Key messages:

  • Despite the major improvements in the lives of people with disability.
  • There is need for to look into ways of increasing their chances of finding a partner.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143076 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx189.128 (DOI)000414389804022 ()
Conference
10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wagman, J. A., King, E. J., Namatovu, F., Kiwanuka, D., Kairania, R., Semanda, J. B., . . . Brahmbhatt, H. (2016). Combined Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Uganda: Design of the SHARE Intervention Strategy. Health Care for Women International, 37(3), 362-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Uganda: Design of the SHARE Intervention Strategy
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2016 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 362-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intimate partner violence (IPV) has a bidirectional relationship with HIV infection. Researchers from the Rakai Health Sciences Program (RHSP), an HIV research and services organization in rural Uganda, conducted a combination IPV and HIV prevention intervention called the Safe Homes and Respect for Everyone (SHARE) Project between 2005 and 2009. SHARE was associated with significant declines in physical and sexual IPV and overall HIV incidence, and its model could be adopted as a promising practice in other settings. In this article we describe how SHARE's IPV-prevention strategies were integrated into RHSP's existing HIV programming and provide recommendations for replication of the approach.

Keywords
HIV Infections, uganda, Sexual Behavior, Spouse Abuse
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119121 (URN)10.1080/07399332.2015.1061526 (DOI)000370965600008 ()26086189 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5471-9043

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