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Neely, Gregory, Professor
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Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Marsja, E., Marsh Everett, J., Hansson, P. & Neely, G. (2019). Examining the Role of Spatial Changes in Bimodal and Uni-Modal To-Be-Ignored Stimuli and How They Affect Short-Term Memory Processes. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1-8, Article ID 299.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the Role of Spatial Changes in Bimodal and Uni-Modal To-Be-Ignored Stimuli and How They Affect Short-Term Memory Processes
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, p. 1-8, article id 299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the potential vulnerability of short-term memory processes to distraction by spatial changes within to-be-ignored bimodal, vibratory, and auditory stimuli. Participants were asked to recall sequences of serially presented dots or digits while being exposed to to-be-ignored stimuli. On unexpected occasions, the bimodal (Experiment 1), vibratory (Experiment 2), or auditory (Experiment 3) stimuli changed their spatial origin from one side of the body (e.g., ear and arm, arm only, ear only) to the other. It was expected that the bimodal stimuli would make the spatial change more salient compared to that of the uni-modal stimuli and that this, in turn, would yield an increase in distraction of serial short-term memory in both the verbal and spatial domains. Performance across three experiments support this assumption as a disruptive effect of the spatial deviant was only observed when presented within the bimodal to-be-ignored sequence (Experiment 1): Uni-modal to-be-ignored sequences, whether vibratory (Experiment 2) or auditory (Experiment 3), had no impact on either verbal or spatial short-term memory. Implications for models of attention capture, short-term memory, and the potential special role attention capturing role of bimodal stimuli is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
bimodal, auditory, tactile, short-term memory, distraction, attention capture, deviant, spatial, verbal
National Category
Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141862 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00299 (DOI)000460833300001 ()30914983 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Söderström, T., Lindgren, C. & Neely, G. (2019). On the relationship between computer simulation training and the development of practical knowing in police education: . The international journal of information and learning technology, 1-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the relationship between computer simulation training and the development of practical knowing in police education:
2019 (English)In: The international journal of information and learning technology, ISSN 2056-4880, E-ISSN 2056-4899, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g. Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966; Argyris and Schön, 1974) as well as empirical examples, this paper discusses the design of and what can be expected from computer simulation training for the development of police students’ professional knowing.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is based on lessons learned from working with two different computer simulation training situations designed to prepare the students for an upcoming practical training by facilitating the understanding of complex situations as they should be handled in the physical training situation.

Findings

The experiences from the training sessions showed that the different characteristics of the simulations mediate how the training session was performed, e.g., unplanned trial and error vs focused and attentive, but also group discussions about how to act and appropriate actions in relation to the situation to be solved in the simulation.

Originality/value

Based on the lessons learned from working with the two different computer simulations, it is posited that the use of computer simulations for practical scenario training is a complex endeavor that needs, in various degrees, to be supported by pedagogical steering. The design of computer simulation training (both the simulation and how the training is designed and performed) need to consider the specific aspects that surround tacit knowledge and embodied learning in the “real sense” (anchored to the practical training) to be of relevance for police students development of professional knowing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Reflection, Tacit knowledge, Adult learning, Vocational education, Professional knowledge
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157684 (URN)10.1108/IJILT-11-2018-0130 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-04-02
Stenlund, T., Öhberg, F., Lundström, R., Lindroos, O., Häger, C., Neely, G. & Rehn, B. (2018). Double-sided Mechanical Shocks Provoke Larger Seated Postural Reactions Compared to Single-Sided Mechanical Shocks. Spine, 43(8), E482-E487
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Double-sided Mechanical Shocks Provoke Larger Seated Postural Reactions Compared to Single-Sided Mechanical Shocks
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2018 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 43, no 8, p. E482-E487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY DESIGN: Human volunteers were exposed experimentally to single-sided mechanical shocks (SSMS) and double-sided mechanical shocks (DSMS) while seated.

OBJECTIVE: To describe and contrast seated postural reactions due to SSMS or DSMS in healthy male adults.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Mechanical shocks to the body, caused when driving on irregular terrain, are suggested to be hazardous to the spine and may be associated with the reported musculoskeletal pain of the back and neck among professional drivers. However, very little is known about the characteristics of seated postural reactions and the biomechanical effects caused by mechanical shocks.

METHODS: Twenty healthy male subjects (18-43 years old) were exposed while seated to 5 SSMS and 15 DSMS in lateral directions. The second acceleration in the DSMS was in the opposite direction to the first acceleration and was either fast, medium or slow depending on the speed of direction change. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded in muscles of the upper neck, trapezius, erector spinae and external oblique while kinematics were recorded with inertial sensors placed at the neck, trunk and pelvis. Muscle activity was normalized to maximum voluntary contractions (MVC).

RESULTS: The EMG amplitudes were significantly higher (0.6-1%; p < 0.001) for the fast DSMS compared to all other shocks. Range of motion (ROM) of the neck and trunk was greater during the DSMS compared to the SSMS. Evoked muscle activity was less than 2% MVC in the trapezius, less than 10% MVC in the erector spinae and upper neck while the activity exceeded 10% MVC in the external oblique muscles.

CONCLUSION: Fast DSMS in lateral directions appear more demanding compared to SSMS, demonstrating augmented seated postural reactions. However, the present mechanical shocks employed did not seem to induce postural reactions with regard to ROM or muscle activity of a magnitude likely to cause musculoskeletal overload.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144712 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000002396 (DOI)000440520600008 ()28858181 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Marsja, E., Neely, G. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2018). Investigating deviance distraction and the impact of the modality of the to-be-ignored stimuli. Experimental psychology (Göttingen), 65(2), 61-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating deviance distraction and the impact of the modality of the to-be-ignored stimuli
2018 (English)In: Experimental psychology (Göttingen), ISSN 1618-3169, E-ISSN 2190-5142, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 61-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been suggested that deviance distraction is caused by unexpected sensory events in the to-be-ignored stimuli violating the cognitive system's predictions of incoming stimuli. The majority of research has used methods where the to-be-ignored expected (standards) and the unexpected (deviants) stimuli are presented within the same modality. Less is known about the behavioral impact of deviance distraction when the to-be-ignored stimuli are presented in different modalities (e.g., standard and deviants presented in different modalities). In three experiments using cross-modal oddball tasks with mixed-modality to-be-ignored stimuli, we examined the distractive role of unexpected auditory deviants presented in a continuous stream of expected standard vibrations. The results showed that deviance distraction seems to be dependent upon the to-be-ignored stimuli being presented within the same modality, and that the simplest omission of something expected; in this case, a standard vibration may be enough to capture attention and distract performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göttingen: Hogrefe & Huber Publishers, 2018
Keywords
Tactile, Auditory, Attention Capture, Visual task, Multisensory, Oddball, Crossmodal, Performance
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141857 (URN)10.1027/1618-3169/a000390 (DOI)000429715300001 ()29631521 (PubMedID)
Projects
An empirical investigation of distraction by unexpected auditory and vibratiory stimuli
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Neely, G., Nilsson, O., Lind, S. & Nordin, S. (2018). Quantifying environmental intolerance with a smartphone app. In: Müller, F., Ludwigs, L, & Kupper, M. (Ed.), Fechner Day 2018: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics. Paper presented at 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics (pp. 271-276). Lüneburg, Germany: International Society for Psychophysics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantifying environmental intolerance with a smartphone app
2018 (English)In: Fechner Day 2018: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics / [ed] Müller, F., Ludwigs, L, & Kupper, M., Lüneburg, Germany: International Society for Psychophysics , 2018, p. 271-276Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Environmental intolerance (EI) is a condition characterized by low tolerance to environmental stimuli at levels that would not affect most people. EI is an ill-defined condition from which sufferers experience highly individual multisystem symptoms following exposure from specific environmental sources. Most research on EI is conducted using cross sectional approaches, however, longitudinal approaches that capture daily exposure are needed to fully understand how EI develops and change over time. This paper describes an app that was developed that can be used with most smartphones and, in conjunction with a website, can be used to collect symptoms and ratings of discomfort in the field as well as qualitative reports of the incident that triggered the discomfort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lüneburg, Germany: International Society for Psychophysics, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153192 (URN)
Conference
34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, F2014-0051
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Söderström, T., Lindgren, C. & Neely, G. (2018). Tacit knowing: Implications for the design of computer simulation training in police education. In: L. Morris & C. Tsolakidis (Ed.), ICICTE 2018 - The!International!Conference!on!Information! Communication!Technologies in!Education!2018: Proceedings. Paper presented at International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education, Chania, Crete, Greece, July 5-7, 2018 (pp. 235-244). ICTE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tacit knowing: Implications for the design of computer simulation training in police education
2018 (English)In: ICICTE 2018 - The!International!Conference!on!Information! Communication!Technologies in!Education!2018: Proceedings / [ed] L. Morris & C. Tsolakidis, ICTE , 2018, p. 235-244Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the practical knowing that is central in police education.Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g.,Argyris & Schön, 1974; Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966) as well asempirical examples, this paper will discuss the design of and what can beexpected from computer simulation training for the development of policestudents' professional knowing. Based on the the lessons learned fromworking with computer simulations in police education we argue thatcomputer simulations can be a useful aid for practical training, but they cannotreplace exercises in scenario training or drill exercises.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ICTE, 2018
Keywords
adult learning, tacit knowledge, reflection, professional knowledge, vocational education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150446 (URN)978-1-9996549-1-7 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education, Chania, Crete, Greece, July 5-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Neely, G., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2018). The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task. PLoS ONE, 13(11), Article ID e0207852.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153436 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0207852 (DOI)000450775300049 ()30458043 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. B. T., Stenling, A., Sjöström, E., Neely, G., Lindner, P., Hassmén, P., . . . Carlbring, P. (2017). Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Affective Disorders, 215, 85-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments.

Method/results: Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges gav treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale.

Limitations: The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed.

Conclusions: The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes.

Keywords
Depression, Physical activity, Behavioral activation, Treatment, RCT, Growth curve modeling
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136322 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.018 (DOI)000401213300012 ()28319696 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FORTE 2011-0477
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjödin, F. & Neely, G. (2017). Communication patterns and stress in the preschool: an observational study. Child Care in Practice, 23(2), 181-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication patterns and stress in the preschool: an observational study
2017 (English)In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 181-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study included 12 preschool departments, with two teachers in six departments characterised by high levels of stress and burnout and two teachers in six departments characterised by low levels of stress and burnout. A total of 24 females with a mean age of 43.5 years participated in the study. The teachers rated stress, fatigue, work demands and work burnout using different questionnaires. Cortisol samples were collected at wake up, one hour after wake up, at 11:00 am and at 09:00 pm. An observation study was conducted to create an overview of the communication patterns between the children and the personnel during different time periods. Significant differences between the two groups of teachers were observed regarding the organisation of the work and family situation. The high-stress teachers had more communications from colleagues than low-stress teachers, spent more time on pedagogical planning and had young children at home. These results support the view that the organisation is a central factor regarding stress experienced by preschool teachers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
Preschool, stress, communication, organisation
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131789 (URN)10.1080/13575279.2016.1259159 (DOI)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 070117
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Tsiakiris, G., Neely, G., Lind, N. & Nordin, S. (2017). Comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis: functional somatic syndromes. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 22(10), 1163-1168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis: functional somatic syndromes
2017 (English)In: Psychology, Health & Medicine, ISSN 1354-8506, E-ISSN 1465-3966, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1163-1168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on the concept of central sensitisation, the present study tested the hypothesis of comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis with diagnoses of functional somatic syndromes (FSSs), including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and migraine. Data were used from the population-based Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406). The participants consisted of 164 individuals with allergic asthma and 298 individuals with allergic rhinitis as well as 2876 individuals without allergic or non-allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. Diagnoses were based on self-reports of having been diagnosed by a physician. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from binary logistic regression analysis, both crude and adjusted for age and education. The adjusted ORs (1.87–4.00) for all FSSs differed significantly from unity for both allergic asthma and rhinitis. The results provide support for the hypothesis of comorbidity in allergic asthma and rhinitis with FSSs. Since central sensitisation is likely to underlie FSSs, the present findings raises the question as to whether central sensitisation may also be involved in allergic asthma and rhinitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, medically unexplained symptoms, migraine, population-based
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131943 (URN)10.1080/13548506.2016.1276606 (DOI)000413923600004 ()28034321 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, 2012030-K
Available from: 2017-02-24 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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