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Byström, Pär
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Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Vasconcelos, F. R., Diehl, S., Rodríguez, P., Hedström, P., Karlsson, J. & Byström, P. (2019). Bottom-up and top-down effects of browning and warming on shallow lake food webs. Global Change Biology, 25, 504-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bottom-up and top-down effects of browning and warming on shallow lake food webs
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2019 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 25, p. 504-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The productivity and trophic structure of aquatic ecosystems is the result of an interplay between bottom-up and top-down forces that operate both within and across the benthic and pelagic compartments of lake food webs. Contemporary and projected climate changes urge the question how this interplay will be affected by increasing inputs of terrestrial derived, dissolved organic matter (‘browning’) and warming. We addressed this issue by exploring how browning and warming affect the behavior of a relatively simple, conceptual model of a shallow lake food web that is compartmentalized into, dynamically coupled, benthic and pelagic components (abiotic resources, primary producers, grazers, and carnivores). We compared model expectations with the results of a factorial manipulation of browning and warming in a replicated, large-scale field experiment. Both the model and the experiment suggest that browning affects the food web from the bottom-up by reducing light supply to the benthic habitat and increasing nutrient supply to the pelagic habitat, with concomitant decreases of benthic and increases of pelagic primary and secondary production. The model also predicts that warming effects should primarily operate via relaxed top-down control by top consumers in the more productive of the two habitats. The latter was only partially supported by the experimental data, possibly because the model still lacks one or two important trophic links, such as the one from pelagic producers to benthic deposit feeders. We propose that our coupled benthic-pelagic food web model provides a useful conceptual starting point for future theoretical and empirical studies of the impacts of environmental changes on shallow lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
benthic and pelagic habitats, bottom-up and top-down control, browning, food webs, light and nutrients, shallow lake, top predator, warming
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133326 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14521 (DOI)000456028900011 ()30430702 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 621-2011-3908Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5238Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGEThe Kempe Foundations
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-05 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Macura, B., Byström, P., Airoldi, L., Eriksson, B. K., Rudstam, L. & Stottrup, J. G. (2019). Impact of structural habitat modifications in coastal temperate systems on fish recruitment: a systematic review. Environmental Evidence, 8(1), Article ID 14.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of structural habitat modifications in coastal temperate systems on fish recruitment: a systematic review
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Evidence, ISSN 2047-2382, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Shallow nearshore marine ecosystems are changing at an increasing rate due to a range of human activities such as urbanisation and commercial development. As a result, an increasing number of structural modifications occur in coastal nursery and spawning habitats of fish. Concomitant to this increase, there have been declines in many coastal fish populations and changes in the composition of fish communities. As requested by Swedish stakeholders, this review aimed to synthesise scientific evidence of the impact on fish recruitment of structural modifications in temperate coastal areas.

Methods: We searched for peer-reviewed and grey literature on such impacts in English, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, German, Swedish and Spanish. Searches were performed in bibliographic databases, specialist websites, bibliographies of review articles. We also contacted stakeholder to find relevant literature. Eligible studies included small- and large-scale field studies in marine systems and large lakes (> 10,000 km(2)) in temperate regions of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Included replicated comparisons of fish recruitment between altered and unaltered control areas, comparisons before and after an alteration, or both. Relevant outcomes (response variables) included measures of recruitment defined as abundance of juvenile fish in coastal habitats. All fish species were considered. Articles were screened for eligibility by title, abstract and full text. Eligible studies were critically appraised based on their external and internal validity. From each eligible study of sufficient validity, we extracted information on study design, measured outcomes, exposure, type of comparator, effect modifiers and study findings. Study findings were synthesised narratively.

Results: We searched for eligible studies in 15 databases, 24 specialist websites, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of 11 review articles. The review finally included 37 studies that were eligible and of sufficient validity to be considered for final synthesis. Most studies (23 of 37) were from the Northern Hemisphere. Studies varied in design, spatial resolution, target fish species, and type of structural habitat change. This high level of variation did not allow for a quantitative synthesis and prevented us from drawing general conclusions on the impact of structures or structural modifications on fish recruitment. In this review we provide a narrative synthesis of the evidence base and classify eligible studies into six categories (based on type of exposure and comparator). The categories are as follows: the impacts on fish recruitment of: (1) artificial structures in coastal areas, (2) structures designed as fish attractors, (3) large scale urban sprawl, (4) 'novel' habitats, (5) habitat loss, and (6) restoration.

Conclusions: This review revealed a very limited evidence base for how structural modifications and marine urban sprawl can affect fish recruitment. Thus, there is a substantial mismatch between stakeholder needs and research evidence. Further, the impact and ecological performance of artificial structures depend both on context and species. Clearly, there is a need for more research on the subject, especially on long-term consequences at larger spatial scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Artificial structures, Coastal habitat loss, Coastal development, Juvenile fish, Marine urban sprawl, rsery, Physical habitat change, Spawning ground, Young-of-the-year, YOY
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157959 (URN)10.1186/s13750-019-0157-3 (DOI)000461529000001 ()
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Hamdan, M., Byström, P., Hotchkiss, E. R., Al-Haidarey, M. J., Ask, J. & Karlsson, J. (2018). Carbon dioxide stimulates lake primary production. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 10878.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon dioxide stimulates lake primary production
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 10878Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gross primary production (GPP) is a fundamental ecosystem process that sequesters carbon dioxide (CO2) and forms the resource base for higher trophic levels. Still, the relative contribution of different controls on GPP at the whole-ecosystem scale is far from resolved. Here we show, by manipulating CO2 concentrations in large-scale experimental pond ecosystems, that CO2 availability is a key driver of whole-ecosystem GPP. This result suggests we need to reformulate past conceptual models describing controls of lake ecosystem productivity and include our findings when developing models used to predict future lake ecosystem responses to environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150361 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-29166-3 (DOI)000439026000039 ()30022034 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050358594 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-10 Created: 2018-08-10 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Vasconcelos, R. F., Diehl, S., Rodríguez, P., Karlsson, J. & Byström, P. (2018). Effects of Terrestrial Organic Matter on Aquatic Primary Production as Mediated by Pelagic-Benthic Resource Fluxes. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 21(6), 1255-1268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Terrestrial Organic Matter on Aquatic Primary Production as Mediated by Pelagic-Benthic Resource Fluxes
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2018 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1255-1268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flows of energy and matter across habitat boundaries can be major determinants of the functioning of recipient ecosystems. It is currently debated whether terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) is a resource subsidy or a resource subtraction in recipient lakes. We present data from a long-term field experiment in which pelagic phosphorus concentration and whole-ecosystem primary production increased with increasing tDOM input, suggesting that tDOM acted primarily as a direct nutrient subsidy. Piecewise structural equation modeling supports, however, a substantial contribution of a second mechanism: colored tDOM acted also as a resource subtraction by shading benthic algae, preventing them from intercepting nutrients released across the sediment-water interface. Inhibition of benthic algae by colored tDOM thus indirectly promoted pelagic algae and whole-ecosystem primary production. We conclude that cross-ecosystem terrestrial DOM inputs can modify light and nutrient flows between aquatic habitats and alter the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic habitats to total primary production. These results are particularly relevant for shallow northern lakes, which are projected to receive increased tDOM runoff.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
spatial subsidy, allochthonous input, dissolved organic matter, resource competition, nutrients, light, pelagic, benthic, warming, brownification, piecewise SEM
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152268 (URN)10.1007/s10021-017-0217-x (DOI)000444384400013 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationThe Kempe FoundationsSwedish Research Council, 621-2011-3908Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5238
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Degerman, R., Lefébure, R., Byström, P., Båmstedt, U., Larsson, S. & Andersson, A. (2018). Food web interactions determine energy transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to inputs of dissolved organic carbon. Hydrobiologia, 805(1), 131-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food web interactions determine energy transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to inputs of dissolved organic carbon
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2018 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 805, no 1, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change projections indicate increased precipitation in northern Europe, leading to increased inflow of allochthonous organic matter to aquatic systems. The food web responses are poorly known, and may differ depending on the trophic structure. We performed an experimental mesocosm study where effects of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on two different pelagic food webs were investigated, one having zooplankton as highest trophic level and the other with planktivorous fish as top consumer. In both food webs, DOC caused higher bacterial production and lower food web efficiency, i.e., energy transfer efficiency from the base to the top of the food web. However, the top-level response to DOC addition differed in the zooplankton and the fish systems. The zooplankton production increased due to efficient channeling of energy via both the bacteria land the phytoplankton pathway, while the fish production decreased due to channeling of energy mainly via the longer and less efficient bacterial pathway. We conclude that the added DOC either acted as a subsidy by increasing the production of the top trophic level (mesozooplankton), or as a sink causing decreased top consumer production (planktivorous fish).

Keywords
Food web efficiency, Carbon transfer, Allochthonous dissolved organic carbon, Mesocosm, Planktivorous fish
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102789 (URN)10.1007/s10750-017-3298-9 (DOI)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Note

Originally published in manuscript form with title Food web interactions determine transfer efficiency and top consumer responses to increased allochthonous carbon input

Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Seekell, D. A., Byström, P. & Karlsson, J. (2018). Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes. Limnology and Oceanography, 63(5), 2171-2178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake morphometry moderates the relationship between water color and fish biomass in small boreal lakes
2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 2171-2178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lake morphometry may moderate the effects of water color on fish biomass in boreal lakes, but empirical evidence is scarce because there are a limited number of lakes for which both water color and bathymetry have been measured. We evaluated variations in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE), an indicator of fish biomass, across orthogonal gradients of light extinction and mean depth in 16 small Swedish lakes (mean depth 1.7-4.8 m, surface area 1-10 ha). Multiple regression coefficients indicated that the effect of light extinction on CPUE was negative, and that the relationship was more negative for deeper lakes than it was for shallower lakes. The pattern was strongest for lakes with mean depths between 2.1 m and 3.5 m. We estimated that 26% of small lakes in boreal Sweden fall within this mean depth range. These results contribute to the growing understanding of how variations in water color and lake morphometry influence patterns of fish biomass across the boreal landscape.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153666 (URN)10.1002/lno.10931 (DOI)000449045600021 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 621-2011-3908Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-4675Swedish Research Council Formas, 215-2010-992
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Lagesson, A., Brodin, T., Fahlman, J., Fick, J., Jonsson, M., Persson, J., . . . Klaminder, J. (2018). No evidence of increased growth or mortality in fish exposed to oxazepam in semi-natural ecosystems. Science of the Total Environment, 615, 608-614
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No evidence of increased growth or mortality in fish exposed to oxazepam in semi-natural ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 615, p. 608-614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of short-term laboratory studies on fish reports behavioral effects from exposure to aquatic contaminants or raised carbon dioxide levels affecting the GABAAreceptor. However, how such GABAergic behavioral modifications (GBMs) impact populations in more complex natural systems is not known. In this study, we induced GBMs in European perch (Perca fluviatilis) via exposure to a GABA agonist (oxazepam) and followed the effects on growth and survival over one summer (70 days) in replicated pond ecosystems. We hypothesized that anticipated GBMs, expressed as anti-anxiety like behaviors (higher activity and boldness levels), that increase feeding rates in laboratory assays, would; i) increase growth and ii) increase mortality from predation. To test our hypotheses, 480 PIT tagged perch of known individual weights, and 12 predators (northern pike, Esox lucius) were evenly distributed in 12 ponds; six control (no oxazepam) and six spiked (15.5 ± 4 μg l− 1 oxazepam [mean ± 1 S.E.]) ponds. Contrary to our hypotheses, even though perch grew on average 16% more when exposed to oxazepam, we found no significant difference between exposed and control fish in growth (exposed: 3.9 ± 1.2 g, control: 2.9 ± 1 g [mean ± 1 S.E.], respectively) or mortality (exposed: 26.5 ± 1.8 individuals pond− 1, control: 24.5 ± 2.6 individuals pond− 1, respectively). In addition, we show that reduced prey capture efficiency in exposed pike may explain the lack of significant differences in predation. Hence, our results suggest that GBMs, which in laboratory studies impact fish behavior, and subsequently also feeding rates, do not seem to generate strong effects on growth and predation-risk in more complex and resource limited natural environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
GABA(A), Behavioral modifications, Ecological effects, Perca fluviatilis, Esox lucius
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142442 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.070 (DOI)000414922600066 ()28988097 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Hedström, P., Bystedt, D., Karlsson, J., Bokma, F. & Byström, P. (2017). Brownification increases winter mortality in fish. Oecologia, 183(2), 587-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brownification increases winter mortality in fish
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2017 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 183, no 2, p. 587-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In northernclimateswinter is a bottleneck for many organisms. Low light and resource availability constrain individual foraging rates,potentially leading tostarvation and increasedmortality.Increasinginput of humic substances to aquatic ecosystems causesbrownification of water and hence a further decreaseof light availability,which may lead tofurther decreased foraging ratesand starvation mortality during winter.To test this hypothesis, we measured the effectsof experimentally increased humicwaterinput on consumption and survival of young-of-the-year (YOY) three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) over winterin largeoutdoor enclosures. Population densitieswereestimated in autumn andthefollowing springand food availabilityand consumptionwere monitoredoverwinter. As hypothesized,mortality washigher underhumic(76%)as compared to ambientconditions (64%).Also, body condition and ingested prey biomass werelower under humic conditionseven thoughresource availability wasnotlower under humic conditions. Light conditions were significantly poorer under humic conditions. This suggeststhat increased mortality and decreased body condition and ingested prey biomasswasnot due to decreased resource availability but due todecreasedsearch efficiencyin this visual feeding consumer. Increased future brownification of aquatic systems may therefore negatively affect both recruitment and densities of fish.

Keywords
Brownification, winter mortality, light limitation, feeding efficiency, metabolism
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127940 (URN)10.1007/s00442-016-3779-y (DOI)000394254500023 ()27915414 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsSwedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 621-2011-3908Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F., Guleikova, L., Brugel, S., Byström, P. & Andersson, A. (2016). A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 3, 8-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea
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2016 (English)In: Regional Studies in Marine Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi has been well documented in southern areas of the Baltic Sea, however, little research on this invasive species (nor the zooplankton community) has focused on the Gulf of Bothnia (Bothnian Sea and Bay). We analysed data collected over a 12–13 year period at two main stations, one coastal and one offshore, to examine the occurrence of C. pengoi, invasion dynamics, effects on natural zooplankton communities and associated environmental factors. Nine other stations in the Gulf of Bothnia were also examined and the contribution to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) diet was quantified. The zooplankton community response apparently differed between coastal and offshore stations with Bosmina, Eurytemora, and Acartia populations being influenced during peak abundances of C. pengoi. It appears that the native zooplankton community has some resilience, returning to its prior structure outside of peak invasion periods. C. pengoi, where present, contributed significantly to stickleback diet. We explored possible barriers for C. pengoi in the Bothnian Bay, suggesting that the low productive Bothnian Bay ecosystem may be incapable of supporting such a predator. This highlights the need for further studies, especially in the light of global climate change.

Keywords
Cercopagis pengoi, Coast, Zooplankton, Invasive species, Barriers, Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea)
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120860 (URN)10.1016/j.rsma.2015.12.004 (DOI)000414755500002 ()
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Calboli, F. C. F., Byström, P. & Merila, J. (2016). A test for within-lake niche differentiation in the nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius). Ecology and Evolution, 6(14), 4753-4760
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A test for within-lake niche differentiation in the nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius)
2016 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 4753-4760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Specialization for the use of different resources can lead to ecological speciation. Accordingly, there are numerous examples of ecologically specialized pairs of fish species in postglacial lakes. Using a polymorphic panel of single nucleotide variants, we tested for genetic footprints of within-lake population stratification in nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) collected from three habitats (viz. littoral, benthic, and pelagic) within a northern Swedish lake. Analyses of admixture, population structure, and relatedness all supported the conclusion that the fish from this lake form a single interbreeding unit.

Keywords
Ecological speciation, Gasterosteidae, habitat differentiation, niche, SNP, stickleback
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124510 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2182 (DOI)000380033400011 ()
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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