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Junghyon, Y. & Rönnlund, M. (2019). Control and agency in comprehensive schools: A cross-cultural perspective of democratic schooling in Finland and Korea. In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, 2019, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world. Paper presented at NERA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control and agency in comprehensive schools: A cross-cultural perspective of democratic schooling in Finland and Korea
2019 (English)In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, 2019, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Drawing on a cross-cultural qualitative study in Finnish and Korean comprehensive schools, we explore how student agency is controlled or manifested in ordinary school scenes and how students reflect their experiences on control and agency. Focusing on teaching-learning practices, student-teacher interactions in daily routines and students’ movements in physical and virtual spaces, we aim to understand how power relations and control indwelling everyday school practices are connected to the issue of the school life of students as democratic citizens.

We utilised an analytical differentiation of the ‘official’, ‘informal’ and ‘physical’ schools (Gordon, Holland and Lahelma, 2000) to analyse the inherent complexity in everyday school life. We also employed Bernstein’s (1996) concepts of classification and framing as the theoretical lens with which to examine relationships between students and teachers and the school system as an institution which has boundaries and hierarchies within it.

The analysis draws on qualitative data produced through fieldwork in two comprehensive schools in southern Finland, and in two primary schools and two middle schools in Seoul, Korea. The data consist of field notes generated through observations and interviews with students and their class teachers. The process of analysis was inspired by a cross-cultural qualitative approach (Lahelma and Gordon, 2010) that combines and relates data from both countries to enhance a theoretical understanding of analogical incidents through the analysis of various cultural contexts and to challenge taken-for-granted familiarity indwelling in the schooling of each national context.

The findings indicate that student agency was controlled and encouraged by varying pedagogic practices that embedded differing understandings on the roles of teachers and students. Students sought to increase their agency and hoped to find the balance between their agency and control, also revealing paradoxical preferences on the limitation of their agency. However, to sum up, student agency was extensively limited, and strong classification appeared throughout school life. Student agency was restricted the most in teaching-learning practices; teacher control in daily routines appeared differently in relation with the roles of teachers in each sociocultural context; and student agency was limited both in real and virtual space.

Lastly, our analyses of control, agency and classification of and among school members and systems lead this article to the discussion of democratic schooling from a cross-cultural perspective. Learning from Nordic school ethnographies and cross-cultural research, we expect that our discussions between Finnish and Korean contexts could provide interesting implications to the research field by connecting individualistic/collectivistic culture and educational welfare systems with student agency

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156821 (URN)
Conference
NERA
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Ledman, K., Nylund, M., Rönnlund, M. & Rosvall, P.-Å. (2019). Democratic implications of school based activities before and after workplace learning. In: : . Paper presented at NERA 2019: The Nordic Educational Research Association, 6-8 March, Uppsala Sweden (pp. 128-129).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Democratic implications of school based activities before and after workplace learning
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157107 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019: The Nordic Educational Research Association, 6-8 March, Uppsala Sweden
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M. (2019). 'I Love this Place, but I Won’t Stay': Identification with Place and Imagined Spatial Futures Among Youth Living in Rural Areas in Sweden. Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'I Love this Place, but I Won’t Stay': Identification with Place and Imagined Spatial Futures Among Youth Living in Rural Areas in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study contributes to a body of literature that addresses relationships betweenspace, place and identity, and their effects on young people’s ‘spatial horizons’.Drawing on ethnographic data from Sweden, it analyses youths’ identification withhome place and how it relates to their imagined spatial futures in terms of staying‘local’ or migrating. The findings indicate that locality strongly influenced the identity-processing of youths, but there was no straightforward relationship betweenidentification with home place and willingness to stay in that place. Rather thehome place’s perceived and narrated relation to other places, as well as its materialconditions, social relationships and practices, contributed to the youths’ articulatedviews of their spatial futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156817 (URN)10.1177/1103308818823818 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013–2142
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-04-05
Rönnlund, M., Ledman, K., Nylund, M. & Rosvall, P.-Å. (2019). Life skills for 'real life': How critical thinking is contextualised across vocational programmes. Educational research (Windsor. Print), 61(3), 302-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life skills for 'real life': How critical thinking is contextualised across vocational programmes
2019 (English)In: Educational research (Windsor. Print), ISSN 0013-1881, E-ISSN 1469-5847, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 302-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This article presents an analysis of how critical thinking is contextualised in everyday teaching in three vocational education and training (VET) programmes: Vehicle and transport, Restaurant and management, and Health and social care.

Purpose: The main question addressed is: What knowledge discourses permeate different VET-contexts, and hence what kinds of opportunities for critical thinking do they offer students?

Method: The qualitative analysis draws on data from a four-year ethnographic project exploring learning processes that can be characterised as civic education in Swedish vocational education. The analysis presented here used data collected during 85 days of observations of teaching in six VET classes, interviews with 81 students and 10 teachers, and collected teaching material. To explore why some contextualisations provided more opportunities and encouragement for critical thinking than others, we applied Bernsteinian concepts of 'horizontal and vertical knowledge discourses' and 'discursive gaps'.

Findings and conclusions: Overall, teaching that was observed focused primarily on 'doing'. However, in all three programmes, the analysis identified that there were also situations that touched upon critical thinking. Three major themes were identified: critical thinking related to 'Personal experiences', 'The other(s)' and 'Wider perspectives'. It appeared that the frequency and nature of such situations varied with the knowledge discourses permeating the programme. Furthermore, we discuss the manifestations of critical thinking in relation to the wider context of what Bernstein refers to as pedagogic rights; individual enhancement, social inclusion and development of the competence and confidence to participate in political processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
critical thinking, vocational education, citizenship education, discursive gaps, life skills, 21st century skills
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161848 (URN)10.1080/00131881.2019.1633942 (DOI)000475213900001 ()
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Bergström, P., Rönnlund, M. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Making the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom: possibilities and challenge. In: Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete i Umeå 19-20 augusti 2019: Abstractbok. Paper presented at Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete, Umeå, Sverige, 19–20 augusti, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom: possibilities and challenge
2019 (English)In: Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete i Umeå 19-20 augusti 2019: Abstractbok, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a case study of a school development project in a Swedish upper secondary school. The project initiators (three teachers), wanted to change their teaching towards student active learning, and as part of that change they designed and prepared a classroom inspired by the Active Learning Classroom model (Baepler et al. 2016). The aim was to increase the understanding of possibilities and challenges when changing the pedagogical practice. The research questions addressed: What characterise the pedagogical practices in the traditional vs newly designed classroom in terms of communication and interaction between teachers and students, and what characterises the pedagogical change? A participatory design-based research (DBR) methodology was applied in three phases: the exploration phase, the development phase and the evaluation phase. This paper focus on a selected sequence of three months of the development phase, exploring teaching in the shift from the traditional classroom to the ALC. The analysis draws on a) video and audio recorded observations of lessons (N=15) in the traditional classroom and in the newly designed classroom, b) teachers’ individual evaluations of lessons based on pre-formulated reflective questions, and c) focus group discussions (N=3) on the topic ‘teaching for students’ active learning’.  The data was analysed using Bernstein’s concepts of classification and framing (2000). Preliminary results indicate variations in outcome of pedagogical change depending on how the teachers worked in the traditional classroom. For example, when the students were unaware of working in groups and using digital facilities collectively, this led to challenges in the active learning classroom.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163629 (URN)
Conference
Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete, Umeå, Sverige, 19–20 augusti, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Beach, D., Johansson, M., Öhrn, E., Rönnlund, M. & Rosvall, P.-Å. (2019). Rurality and education relations: metro-centricity and local values in rural communities and rural schools. European Educational Research Journal (online), 18(1), 19-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rurality and education relations: metro-centricity and local values in rural communities and rural schools
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2019 (English)In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 19-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on ethnographic fieldwork in six different types of rural area and their schools in different parts of Sweden, this article identifies how rural schools relate to the local place and discusses some of the educational implications from this. Recurrent references to the local community were present in some schools and people there explicitly positioned themselves in the local rural context and valorised rurality positively in education exchanges, content and interactions, with positive effects on young people's experiences of participation and inclusion. These factors tended to occur in sparsely populated areas. An emphasis on nature and its value as materially vital in people's lives was present as was a critique of middle-class metrocentricity. Such values and critique seemed to be absent in other areas, where rurality was instead often represented along the metrocentric lines of a residual space in modernizing societies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
rural, urban, education markets, ethnography, multi-sited ethnography
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147608 (URN)10.1177/1474904118780420 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048751193 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
Nylund, M., Ledman, K., Rosvall, P.-Å. & Rönnlund, M. (2019). Socialisation and citizenship preparation in vocational education: Pedagogic codes and democratic rights in VET-subjects. British Journal of Sociology of Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socialisation and citizenship preparation in vocational education: Pedagogic codes and democratic rights in VET-subjects
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Previous studies of citizenship preparation in upper secondary school, including studies on vocational programmes, have primarily focused on general subjects. Potential and actual roles of vocational subjects in this context have received little attention, so we have little knowledge of what is likely a significant part of the citizenship preparation that occurs in vocational programmes. Drawing on the work of Basil Bernstein and ethnographic data, this study presents an analysis of socialisation processes in vocational elements of three vocational programmes in Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis addresses the formation of pedagogic codes in various vocational programmes and subjects, and how these codes condition students’ practice of citizenship at individual, social and political levels. The results show how different pedagogic codes have different implications for the students’ practice of citizenship, and thus raise questions about factors and processes that may either constrain or strengthen, this aspect in vocational subject classes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Vocational education, democratic rights, pedagogic codes, social class, Basil Bernstein, citizenship education
National Category
Pedagogical Work Pedagogy
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164250 (URN)10.1080/01425692.2019.1665498 (DOI)000490805600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02002
Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2019-11-06
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.. In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world. Paper presented at NERA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.
2019 (English)In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a case study of trends and transitions in the context of Nordic school design. The aim is to explore how local stakeholders in Sweden (principals, school leaders and architects) involved in school building projects envision a ‘good’ learning environment and what perceptions of teaching and learning that underlie their visions. By including various groups of stakeholders, we also aim at exploring how their views relate to each other. Drawn on the results, we discuss their ideas in relation to wider discourses on teaching and learning in late modern society with focus on local – global transitions.

The study draws on a relational understanding of space (Massey 2005; McGregor 2004), and the idea that physical, social and pedagogical dimensions of learning space are generated together and continuously in process. Furthermore, we understand learning spaces as areas where power relations, control and agency are performed. In line with this understanding the analysis draws on Bernstein’s concepts ‘classification’ and ‘framing’ (Bernstein 2000).

We conducted semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at different levels (municipality level, school level) involved in projects concerning construction and reconstruction of school buildings. At the level of municipalities, interviews where held with 8 officials/school leaders and 3 architects. At the school level, interviews where held with 9 principals (n 20). Interview data was analysed inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis as advocated by Wodac and Fairclough (1997).

We identified two main discourses about how learning space shall be constituted, that differed in terms of classification. One which celebrated clear boundaries and separations between different places/localities, i.e. strong classification in physical space, and one which celebrated more blurred boundaries and separations in physical space, i.e. weak classification between localities. Furthermore, the framing came in different forms in the two discourses - more strong framing of student-teacher relations and communication in the first discourse and more weak framing in the second discourse. Thus, strongly classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) strong framing of communication and behaviour (clear and explicit rules and principles for classroom practices), and weak classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) more weak framing of practices (the rules and principles for learning being merely implicit). No matter of what discourse or profession they represented, the stakeholders advocated a pedagogical approach directed towards ‘active’ learning and saw the student as an ‘active learner‘.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156827 (URN)
Conference
NERA
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Teaching for Active Learning in relation to Design and Use of Physical and Digital Space. In: ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany 3-6 September, 2019: Education in an Era of Risk: the Role of Educational Research for the Future. Paper presented at ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany, 3-6 September, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching for Active Learning in relation to Design and Use of Physical and Digital Space
2019 (English)In: ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany 3-6 September, 2019: Education in an Era of Risk: the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Educational practices are influenced by a complex interaction between different factors of school life and changes in the physical environment can affect teaching practices in different directions (e.g. (Blackmore et al., 2011; Gislason, 2010; Grannäs & Frelin, 2017; Sigurðardóttir & Hjartarson 2016; Stadler-Altmann 2016; Veloso et al 2014; Woolner & Uline, 2019). With this as a starting point, this paper reports on a case study of a school development project in a Swedish upper secondary school. The project initiators (three teachers), wanted to change their teaching to become more student activity based, and as part of that change they designed and prepared a classroom inspired by the Active Learning Classroom (ALC) model (Baepler et al. 2016). In line with the ALC model, they furnished the classroom with round tables for groups of students, access to whiteboards, and digital facilities i.e. smartboards, interactive pens, projectors, and student laptop access. Hence, a design that implies collaborative work, communication and intense interaction. We employed a participatory design-based research (DBR) methodology to study the teachers’ school development project, concentrating on three phases: the exploration phase, the development phase and the evaluation phase (Holmberg, 2019). This paper focus on a selected sequence of three months of the development phase, exploring teaching in the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom with regard to possibilities and challenges for students’ active learning. The questions addressed are: What characterize the pedagogical practices in the traditional vs. newly designed classroom in terms of communication and interaction? What characterizes the pedagogical change? The analysis draws on a) video and audio recorded observations of lessons (N=15) in the traditional classroom and in the newly designed classroom, b) teachers’ individual evaluations of lessons based on pre-formulated reflective questions, and c) focus group discussions (N=3) on the topic ‘teaching for students’ active learning’. The data was analyzed using Bernstein’s concepts classification and framing (2000). Preliminary results indicate variations in outcome of pedagogical change depending on how the teachers worked in the traditional classroom. For example, when the students were unaware of working in groups and using digital facilities collectively, this led to challenges in the active learning classroom.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163628 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany, 3-6 September, 2019
Note

This paper was part of the symposium "Digital Learning Spaces: Hopes and Risks".

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Berggren, L., Olsson, C., Talvia, S., Hörnell, A., Rönnlund, M. & Waling, M. (2019). The lived experiences of school lunch: an empathy-based study with children in Sweden. Children's Geographies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lived experiences of school lunch: an empathy-based study with children in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

School lunch is in general regulated through policies and agendas constituted by the perspectives of adults. In this article, we focus on children’s lived experiences of school lunch with a special emphasis on emotions and how they relate to social and physical dimensions. This study draws on empathy-based stories written by 10–11 year olds (n = 171) from schools in Sweden. We identified three themes: Interaction and exposure, Routines and restrictions and Food and eating. The children’s lived experiences of school lunch and the emotions attached to them are closely associated and intertwined with the socio-spatial dimension of school lunch. A pleasant meal experience seems to require harmonization between the physical and social space whilst negative experiences contain tensions between them, something that actors working with school lunch and school lunch environments should take in consideration when resourcing, planning and scheduling school lunch, and also when designing new school restaurants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
School lunch, lived experiences, empathy-based stories, emotions, children's spaces, Henri Lefebvre
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161898 (URN)10.1080/14733285.2019.1642447 (DOI)000476147700001 ()2-s2.0-85069037183 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5308-7002

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