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Ahlm, Clas
Publications (10 of 145) Show all publications
Lwande, O. W., Näslund, J., Lundmark, E., Ahlm, K., Ahlm, C., Bucht, G. & Evander, M. (2019). Experimental Infection and Transmission Competence of Sindbis Virus in Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens Mosquitoes from Northern Sweden. Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 19(2), 128-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Infection and Transmission Competence of Sindbis Virus in Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens Mosquitoes from Northern Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus known to infect birds and cause intermittent outbreaks among humans in Fenno-Scandia. In Sweden, the endemic area has mainly been in central Sweden. Recently, SINV infections have emerged to northern Sweden, but the vectorial efficiency for SINV of mosquito species in this northern region has not yet been ascertained.

Objective: Mosquito larvae were sampled from the Umea region in northern Sweden and propagated in a laboratory to adult stage to investigate the infection, dissemination, and transmission efficiency of SINV in mosquitoes.

Materials and Methods: The mosquito species were identified by DNA barcoding of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. Culex torrentium was the most abundant (82.2%) followed by Culex pipiens (14.4%), Aedes annulipes (1.1%), Anopheles claviger (1.1%), Culiseta bergrothi (1.1%), or other unidentified species (1.1%). Mosquitoes were fed with SINV-infected blood and monitored for 29 days to determine the viral extrinsic incubation period. Infection and dissemination were determined by RT-qPCR screening of dissected body parts of individual mosquitoes. Viral transmission was determined from saliva collected from individual mosquitoes at 7, 14, and 29 days. SINV was detected by cell culture using BHK-21 cells, RT-qPCR, and sequencing.

Results: Cx. torrentium was the only mosquito species in our study that was able to transmit SINV. The overall transmission efficiency of SINV in Cx. torrentium was 6.8%. The rates of SINV infection, dissemination, and transmission in Cx. torrentium were 11%, 75%, and 83%, respectively.

Conclusions: Cx. torrentium may be the key vector involved in SINV transmission in northern Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2019
Keywords
Sindbis virus, Alphavirus, dissemination, transmission, Culex mosquitoes
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152980 (URN)10.1089/vbz.2018.2311 (DOI)000446699100001 ()30300110 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060807212 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 221-2014-1556
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Lwande, O. W., Obanda, V., Lindstrom, A., Ahlm, C., Evander, M., Näslund, J. & Bucht, G. (2019). Globe-Trotting Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: Risk Factors for Arbovirus Pandemics. Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Article ID CTANDER P, 1995, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, V262, P13 ntenille D, 1997, TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, V91,.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Globe-Trotting Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: Risk Factors for Arbovirus Pandemics
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2019 (English)In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, article id CTANDER P, 1995, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, V262, P13 ntenille D, 1997, TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, V91Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Two species of Aedes (Ae.) mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus) are primary vectors for emerging arboviruses that are a significant threat to public health and economic burden worldwide. Distribution of these vectors and the associated arboviruses, such as dengue virus, chikungunya virus, yellow fever virus, and Zika virus, was for a long time restricted by geographical, ecological, and biological factors. Presently, arbovirus emergence and dispersion are more rapid and geographically widespread, largely due to expansion of the range for these two mosquitoes that have exploited the global transportation network, land perturbation, and failure to contain the mosquito population coupled with enhanced vector competence. Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus may also sustain transmission between humans without having to depend on their natural reservoir forest cycles due to arthropod adaptation to urbanization. Currently, there is no single strategy that is adequate to control these vectors, especially when managing arbovirus outbreaks. Objective: This review aimed at presenting the characteristics and abilities of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, which can drive a global public health risk, and suggests strategies for prevention and control. Methods: This review presents the geographic range, reproduction and ecology, vector competence, genetic evolution, and biological and chemical control of these two mosquito species and how they have changed and developed over time combined with factors that may drive pandemics and mitigation measures. Conclusion: We suggest that more efforts should be geared toward the development of a concerted multidisciplinary approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, 2019
Keywords
mosquitoes, arboviruses, vector control, pandemic risk
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164457 (URN)10.1089/vbz.2019.2486 (DOI)000488218500001 ()31556813 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22
Sola-Riera, C., Gupta, S., Maleki, K. T., Gonzalez-Rodriguez, P., Saidi, D., Zimmer, C. L., . . . Klingstrom, J. (2019). Hantavirus Inhibits TRAIL-Mediated Killing of Infected Cells by Downregulating Death Receptor 5. Cell reports, 28(8), 2124-2139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hantavirus Inhibits TRAIL-Mediated Killing of Infected Cells by Downregulating Death Receptor 5
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2019 (English)In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 2124-2139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cytotoxic lymphocytes normally kill virus-infected cells by apoptosis induction. Cytotoxic granule-dependent apoptosis induction engages the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, whereas death receptor (DR)-dependent apoptosis triggers the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Hantaviruses, single-stranded RNA viruses of the order Bunyavirales, induce strong cytotoxic lymphocyte responses in infected humans. Cytotoxic lymphocytes, however, are largely incapable of eradicating hantavirus-infected cells. Here, we show that the prototypic hantavirus, Hantaan virus (HTNV), induces TRAIL production but strongly inhibits TRAIL-mediated extrinsic apoptosis induction in infected cells by downregulating DR5 cell surface expression. Mechanistic analyses revealed that HTNV triggers both 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of DR5 through direct ubiquitination of DR5 and hampers DR5 transport to the cell surface. These results corroborate earlier findings, demonstrating that hantavirus also inhibits cytotoxic cell granule-dependent apoptosis induction. Together, these findings show that HTNV counteracts intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis induction pathways, providing a defense mechanism utilized by hantaviruses to inhibit cytotoxic cell-mediated eradication of infected cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cell Press, 2019
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163683 (URN)10.1016/j.celrep.2019.07.066 (DOI)000482135400015 ()31433987 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Löfstedt, A., Ahlm, C., Tesi, B., Bergdahl, I., Nordenskjöld, M., Bryceson, Y. T., . . . Meeths, M. (2019). Haploinsufficiency of UNC13D increases the risk of lymphoma. Cancer, 125(11), 1848-1854
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haploinsufficiency of UNC13D increases the risk of lymphoma
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2019 (English)In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 125, no 11, p. 1848-1854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Experimental models have demonstrated that immune surveillance by cytotoxic lymphocytes can protect from spontaneous neoplasms and cancer. In humans, defective lymphocyte cytotoxicity is associated with the development of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a hyperinflammatory syndrome. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the degree to which human lymphocyte cytotoxicity protects from cancer remains unclear. In the current study, the authors examined the risk of lymphoma attributable to haploinsufficiency in a gene required for lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

METHODS: The authors exploited a founder effect of an UNC13D inversion, which abolishes Munc13-4 expression and causes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in an autosomal recessive manner. Within 2 epidemiological screening programs in northern Sweden, an area demonstrating a founder effect of this specific UNC13D mutation, all individuals with a diagnosis of lymphoma (487 patients) and matched controls (1844 controls) were assessed using polymerase chain reaction for carrier status.

RESULTS: Among 487 individuals with lymphoma, 15 (3.1%) were heterozygous carriers of the UNC13D inversion, compared with 18 controls (1.0%) (odds ratio, 3.0; P = .002). It is interesting to note that a higher risk of lymphoma was attributed to female carriers (odds ratio, 3.7; P = .004).

CONCLUSIONS: Establishing a high regional prevalence of the UNC13D inversion, the authors have reported an overrepresentation of this mutation in individuals with lymphoma. Therefore, the results of the current study indicate that haploinsufficiency of a gene required for lymphocyte cytotoxicity can predispose patients to lymphoma, suggesting the importance of cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated surveillance of cancer. Furthermore, the results of the current study suggest that female carriers are more susceptible to lymphoma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
cancer, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, immune surveillance, lymphocyte cytotoxicity, lymphoma
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157884 (URN)10.1002/cncr.32011 (DOI)000467473000015000467473000015 ()30758854 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061503911 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Klingstrom, J., Smed-Sörensen, A., Maleki, K. T., Sola-Riera, C., Ahlm, C., Björkström, N. K. & Ljunggren, H. G. (2019). Innate and adaptive immune responses against human Puumala virus infection: immunopathogenesis and suggestions for novel treatment strategies for severe hantavirus-associated syndromes. Journal of Internal Medicine, 285(5), 510-523
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innate and adaptive immune responses against human Puumala virus infection: immunopathogenesis and suggestions for novel treatment strategies for severe hantavirus-associated syndromes
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 285, no 5, p. 510-523Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two related hyperinflammatory syndromes are distinguished following infection of humans with hantaviruses: haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) seen in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) seen in the Americas. Fatality rates are high, up to 10% for HFRS and around 35%-40% for HPS. Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most common HFRS-causing hantavirus in Europe. Here, we describe recent insights into the generation of innate and adaptive cell-mediated immune responses following clinical infection with PUUV. First described are studies demonstrating a marked redistribution of peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes (MNP) to the airways, a process that may underlie local immune activation at the site of primary infection. We then describe observations of an excessive natural killer (NK) cell activation and the persistence of highly elevated numbers of NK cells in peripheral blood following PUUV infection. A similar vigorous CD8 Tcell response is also described, though Tcell responses decline with viraemia. Like MNPs, many NK cells and CD8 T cells also localize to the lung upon acute PUUV infection. Following this, findings demonstrating the ability of hantaviruses, including PUUV, to cause apoptosis resistance in infected target cells, are described. These observations, and associated inflammatory cytokine responses, may provide new insights into HFRS and HPS disease pathogenesis. Based on similarities between inflammatory responses in severe hantavirus infections and other hyperinflammatory disease syndromes, we speculate whether some therapeutic interventions that have been successful in the latter conditions may also be applicable in severe hantavirus infections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
hantavirus, orthohantavirus, Puumala virus, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, viral immunity
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161541 (URN)10.1111/joim.12876 (DOI)000471324100004 ()30663801 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationNovo NordiskStockholm County CouncilVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Rankin, G., Byström, J. W., Gustafsson, R., Hansson, M., Thunberg, T., Ahlm, C. & Connolly, A.-M. F. (2019). MMP9 Associates with Endothelial Glycocalyx Degradation During Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome. Paper presented at 3rd Joint Meeting of the European-Society-for-Microcirculation (ESM) and the European-Vascular-Biology-Organization (EVBO), Maastricht, Netherlands, April, 2019.. Journal of Vascular Research, 56, 35-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MMP9 Associates with Endothelial Glycocalyx Degradation During Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 56, p. 35-35Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is characterized by fever, hypotension, vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia and renal failure. HFRS in Sweden is caused by the Puumala hantavirus and is spread by viral-infested droppings from bank voles. The health care system has little to offer these patients since there is no antiviral treatment and as of yet there is no vaccine prophylaxis available. We previously showed that a marker of endothelial glycocalyx degradation (Syndecan-1) was associated with disease severity and disseminated intravascular coagulation during HFRS (Connolly-Andersen et al., 2014, Open Forum Infect Dis.).

Methods: We analysed the levels of other endothelial glycocalyx degradation markers (heparan sulfate, soluble thrombomodulin, albumin), a potential “sheddase”: Matrix Metalloproinase 9 (MMP9) and neutrophil activation/tissue damage (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) in patient plasma from 44 HFRS patients collected consecutively following disease onset. We used the generalized estimating equation to analyse the association between endothelial glycocalyx degradation, MMP9 levels, neutrophil activation/tissue damage and HFRS disease outcome (need for oxygen, transfusion with blood components, need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment and renal damage).

Results: 44 HFRS patients were included in this study (29 females (66%)); need for oxygen: 11 (25%); transfusion with blood components: 3 (7%) and stay at ICU: 2 (5%)). The levels of MMP9 were significantly associated with all markers of endothelial glycocalyx degradation. Neutrophil activation/tissue damage (NGAL) was also significantly associated with MMP9 and endothelial glycocalyx degradation markers (apart from albumin (p = 0.053). In addition degradation of endothelial glycocalyx associated with HFRS disease outcome.

Conclusion: Degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx could be a potential mechanism of HFRS pathogenesis, and potentially MMP9 could contribute to degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158767 (URN)10.1159/000499516 (DOI)000463529300074 ()
Conference
3rd Joint Meeting of the European-Society-for-Microcirculation (ESM) and the European-Vascular-Biology-Organization (EVBO), Maastricht, Netherlands, April, 2019.
Note

Supplement 1, meeting abstract 73.

Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08
Islam, M. K. K., Strand, M., Saleeb, M., Svensson, R., Baranczewski, P., Artursson, P., . . . Evander, M. (2018). Anti-Rift Valley fever virus activity in vitro, pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of benzavir-2, a broad-acting antiviral compound. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 1925.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anti-Rift Valley fever virus activity in vitro, pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of benzavir-2, a broad-acting antiviral compound
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne hemorrhagic fever virus affecting both humans and animals with severe morbidity and mortality and is classified as a potential bioterror agent due to the possible aerosol transmission. At present there is no human vaccine or antiviral therapy available. Thus, there is a great need to develop new antivirals for treatment of RVFV infections. Benzavir-2 was previously identified as potent inhibitor of human adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, and type 2. Here we assess the anti-RVFV activity of benzavir-2 together with four structural analogs and determine pre-clinical pharmacokinetic parameters of benzavir-2. In vitro, benzavir-2 efficiently inhibited RVFV infection, viral RNA production and production of progeny viruses. In vitro, benzavir-2 displayed satisfactory solubility, good permeability and metabolic stability. In mice, benzavir-2 displayed oral bioavailability with adequate maximum serum concentration. Oral administration of benzavir-2 formulated in peanut butter pellets gave high systemic exposure without any observed toxicity in mice. To summarize, our data demonstrated potent anti-RVFV activity of benzavir-2 in vitro together with a promising pre-clinical pharmacokinetic profile. This data support further exploration of the antiviral activity of benzavir-2 in in vivo efficacy models that may lead to further drug development for human use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144950 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-20362-9 (DOI)000423663100004 ()29386590 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-09-14Bibliographically approved
Thunström Salzer, A., Niemiec, M. J., Hosseinzadeh, A., Stylianou, M., Åstrom, F., Röhm, M., . . . Urban, C. F. (2018). Assessment of Neutrophil Chemotaxis Upon G-CSF Treatment of Healthy Stem Cell Donors and in Allogeneic Transplant Recipients. Frontiers in Immunology, 9, Article ID 1968.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of Neutrophil Chemotaxis Upon G-CSF Treatment of Healthy Stem Cell Donors and in Allogeneic Transplant Recipients
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1968Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neutrophils are crucial for the human innate immunity and constitute the majority of leukocytes in circulation. Thus, blood neutrophil counts serve as a measure for the immune system's functionality. Hematological patients often have low neutrophil counts due to disease or chemotherapy. To increase neutrophil counts and thereby preventing infections in high-risk patients, recombinant G-CSF is widely used as adjunct therapy to stimulate the maturation of neutrophils. In addition, G-CSF is utilized to recruit stem cells (SCs) into the peripheral blood of SC donors. Still, the actual functionality of neutrophils resulting from G-CSF treatment remains insufficiently understood. We tested the ex vivo functionality of neutrophils isolated from blood of G-CSF-treated healthy SC donors. We quantified chemotaxis, oxidative burst, and phagocytosis before and after treatment and detected significantly reduced chemotactic activity upon G-CSF treatment. Similarly, in vitro treatment of previously untreated neutrophils with G-CSF led to reduced chemotactic activity. In addition, we revealed that this effect persists in the allogeneic SC recipients up to 4 weeks after neutrophil engraftment. Our data indicates that neutrophil quantity, as a sole measure of immunocompetence in high-risk patients should be considered cautiously as neutrophil functionality might be affected by the primary treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
neutrophil, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), allogeneic transplant, chemotaxis, hematopoietic stern cell donor
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152255 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2018.01968 (DOI)000444324800001 ()30254629 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Westman, G., Sohrabian, A., Aurelius, E., Ahlm, C., Schliamser, S., Sund, F., . . . Rönnelid, J. (2018). Clinical significance of IgM and IgA class anti-NMDAR antibodies in herpes simplex encephalitis. Journal of Clinical Virology, 103, 75-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical significance of IgM and IgA class anti-NMDAR antibodies in herpes simplex encephalitis
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Virology, ISSN 1386-6532, E-ISSN 1873-5967, Vol. 103, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a devastating disease, often leaving patients with severe disabilities. It has been shown that IgG anti-N-methyl-o-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies appear in approximately 25% of HSE patients and could be associated with impaired recovery of cognitive performance. Objectives: To characterize the prevalence of IgM and IgA anti-NMDAR antibodies in HSE patients, in relation to subsequent development of IgG anti-NMDAR and correlation to cognitive performance. Study design: A total of 48 subjects were included from a previously described cohort of patients with HSE verified by HSV-1 PCR. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples drawn close to onset of disease, after 14-21 days of iv aciclovir treatment and after 90 days of follow-up, were analyzed for the presence of IgM and IgA anti-NMDAR, and related to IgG anti-NMDAR. Antibody levels were correlated to the recovery of cognitive performance, as estimated by the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS), for a total of 24 months. Results: In total, 27 of 48 (56%) study subjects were anti-NMDAR positive, defined as the presence of IgG (12/ 48, 25%), IgM (14/48, 29%) or IgA (13/48, 27%) antibodies in CSF and/or serum. IgM or IgA anti-NMDAR did not predict subsequent IgG autoimmunization and did not correlate to cognitive outcome. IgG anti-NMDAR serostatus, but not antibody titers, correlated to impaired recovery of cognitive performance. Conclusions: A majority of HSE patients develop IgG, IgM or IgA anti-NMDAR antibodies. However, the predictive value and clinical relevance of non-IgG isotypes remains to be shown in this setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Herpes simplex encephalitis, HSV-1, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies, NMDAR, IgA, IgM
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148728 (URN)10.1016/j.jcv.2018.04.007 (DOI)000432698300014 ()29698873 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046011811 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Mosomtai, G., Evander, M., Mundia, C., Sandström, P., Ahlm, C., Hassan, O. A., . . . Sang, R. (2018). Datasets for mapping pastoralist movement patterns and risk zones of Rift Valley fever occurrence. Data in Brief, 16, 762-770
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Datasets for mapping pastoralist movement patterns and risk zones of Rift Valley fever occurrence
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2018 (English)In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 16, p. 762-770Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic disease affecting humans and animals. It is caused by RVF virus transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitoes. The data presented in this article propose environmental layers suitable for mapping RVF vector habitat zones and livestock migratory routes. Using species distribution modelling, we used RVF vector occurrence data sampled along livestock migratory routes to identify suitable vector habitats within the study region which is located in the central and the north-eastern part of Kenya. Eleven herds monitored with GPS collars were used to estimate cattle utilization distribution patterns. We used kernel density estimator to produce utilization contours where the 0.5 percentile represents core grazing areas and the 0.99 percentile represents the entire home range. The home ranges were overlaid on the vector suitability map to identify risks zones for possible RVF exposure. Assimilating high spatial and temporal livestock movement and vector distribution datasets generates new knowledge in understanding RVF epidemiology and generates spatially explicit risk maps. The results can be used to guide vector control and vaccination strategies for better disease control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Home range estimation, Vector distribution, Rift Valley fever
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155042 (URN)10.1016/j.dib.2017.11.097 (DOI)000449758500102 ()29276743 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
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