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Nyberg, Lars
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Publications (10 of 260) Show all publications
Karalija, N., Papenberg, G., Wåhlin, A., Johansson, J., Andersson, M., Axelsson, J., . . . Nyberg, L. (2019). C957T-mediated Variation in Ligand Affinity Affects the Association between C-11-raclopride Binding Potential and Cognition. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 31(2), 314-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>C957T-mediated Variation in Ligand Affinity Affects the Association between C-11-raclopride Binding Potential and Cognition
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2019 (English)In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 314-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dopamine (DA) system plays an important role in cognition. Accordingly, normal variation in DA genes has been found to predict individual differences in cognitive performance. However, little is known of the impact of genetic differences on the link between empirical indicators of the DA system and cognition in humans. The present work used PET with C-11-raclopride to assess DA D2-receptor binding potential (BP) and links to episodic memory, working memory, and perceptual speed in 179 healthy adults aged 64-68 years. Previously, the T-allele of a DA D2-receptor single-nucleotide polymorphism, C957T, was associated with increased apparent affinity of C-11-raclopride, giving rise to higher BP values despite similar receptor density values between allelic groups. Consequently, we hypothesized that C-11-raclopride BP measures inflated by affinity rather than D2-receptor density in T-allele carriers would not be predictive of DA integrity and therefore prevent finding an association between C-11-raclopride BP and cognitive performance. In accordance with previous findings, we show that C-11-raclopride BP was increased in T-homozygotes. Importantly, C-11-raclopride BP was only associated with cognitive performance in groups with low or average ligand affinity (C-allele carriers of C957T, n = 124), but not in the high-affinity group (T-homozygotes, n = 55). The strongest C-11-raclopride BP-cognition associations and the highest level of performance were found in C-homozygotes. These findings show that genetic differences modulate the link between BP and cognition and thus have important implications for the interpretation of DA assessments with PET and C-11-raclopride in multiple disciplines ranging from cognitive neuroscience to psychiatry and neurology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2019
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155630 (URN)10.1162/jocn_a_01354 (DOI)000454429400011 ()30407135 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRagnar Söderbergs stiftelseTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseThe Swedish Brain FoundationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Salami, A., Garrett, D. D., Wåhlin, A., Rieckmann, A., Papenberg, G., Karalija, N., . . . Nyberg, L. (2019). Dopamine D2/3 Binding Potential Modulates Neural Signatures of Working Memory in a Load-Dependent Fashion.. Journal of Neuroscience, 39(3), 537-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine D2/3 Binding Potential Modulates Neural Signatures of Working Memory in a Load-Dependent Fashion.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 537-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dopamine (DA) modulates corticostriatal connections. Studies in which imaging of the DA system is integrated with functional imaging during cognitive performance have yielded mixed findings. Some work has shown a link between striatal DA (measured by PET) and fMRI activations, whereas others have failed to observe such a relationship. One possible reason for these discrepant findings is differences in task demands, such that a more demanding task with greater prefrontal activations may yield a stronger association with DA. Moreover, a potential DA–BOLD association may be modulated by task performance. We studied 155 (104 normal-performing and 51 low-performing) healthy older adults (43% females) who underwent fMRI scanning while performing a working memory (WM) n-back task along with DA D2/3 PET assessment using [11C]raclopride. Using multivariate partial-least-squares analysis, we observed a significant pattern revealing positive associations of striatal as well as extrastriatal DA D2/3 receptors to BOLD response in the thalamo–striatal–cortical circuit, which supports WM functioning. Critically, the DA–BOLD association in normal-performing, but not low-performing, individuals was expressed in a load-dependent fashion, with stronger associations during 3-back than 1-/2-back conditions. Moreover, normal-performing adults expressing upregulated BOLD in response to increasing task demands showed a stronger DA–BOLD association during 3-back, whereas low-performing individuals expressed a stronger association during 2-back conditions. This pattern suggests a nonlinear DA–BOLD performance association, with the strongest link at the maximum capacity level. Together, our results suggest that DA may have a stronger impact on functional brain responses during more demanding cognitive tasks.

Keywords
PET, aging, dopamine, fMRI, working memory
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155492 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1493-18.2018 (DOI)000455849400013 ()30478031 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseRagnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Swedish Brain FoundationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
de Boer, L., Axelsson, J., Chowdhury, R., Riklund, K., Dolan, R. J., Nyberg, L., . . . Guitart-Masip, M. (2019). Dorsal striatal dopamine D1 receptor availability predicts an instrumental bias in action learning. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(1), 261-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dorsal striatal dopamine D1 receptor availability predicts an instrumental bias in action learning
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 261-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Learning to act to obtain reward and inhibit to avoid punishment is easier compared with learning the opposite contingencies. This coupling of action and valence is often thought of as a Pavlovian bias, although recent research has shown it may also emerge through instrumental mechanisms. We measured this learning bias with a rewarded go/no-go task in 60 adults of different ages. Using computational modeling, we characterized the bias as being instrumental. To assess the role of endogenous dopamine (DA) in the expression of this bias, we quantified DA D1 receptor availability using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [11C]SCH23390. Using principal-component analysis on the binding potentials in a number of cortical and striatal regions of interest, we demonstrated that cortical, dorsal striatal, and ventral striatal areas provide independent sources of variance in DA D1 receptor availability. Interindividual variation in the dorsal striatal component was related to the strength of the instrumental bias during learning. These data suggest at least three anatomical sources of variance in DA D1 receptor availability separable using PET in humans, and we provide evidence that human dorsal striatal DA D1 receptors are involved in the modulation of instrumental learning biases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2019
Keywords
decision making, dopamine, Pavlovian bias, instrumental learning, positron emission tomography
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155637 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1816704116 (DOI)000454707700042 ()30563856 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR521-2013-2589
Available from: 2019-01-25 Created: 2019-01-25 Last updated: 2019-01-25Bibliographically approved
Cabeza, R., Albert, M., Belleville, S., Craik, F. I. M., Duarte, A., Grady, C. L., . . . Rajah, M. N. (2019). Reply to 'Mechanisms underlying resilience in ageing' [Letter to the editor]. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 20(4), 247-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reply to 'Mechanisms underlying resilience in ageing'
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2019 (English)In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, ISSN 1471-003X, E-ISSN 1471-0048, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 247-247Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157943 (URN)10.1038/s41583-019-0139-z (DOI)000461695900008 ()30814676 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, L. & Pudas, S. (2019). Successful Memory Aging. Annual Review of Psychology, 70, 219-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Successful Memory Aging
2019 (English)In: Annual Review of Psychology, ISSN 0066-4308, E-ISSN 1545-2085, Vol. 70, p. 219-243Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For more than 50 years, psychologists, gerontologists, and, more recently, neuroscientists have considered the possibility of successful aging. How to define successful aging remains debated, but well-preserved age-sensitive cognitive functions, like episodic memory, is an often-suggested criterion. Evidence for successful memory aging comes from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies showing that some older individuals display high and stable levels of performance. Successful memory aging may be accomplished via multiple paths. One path is through brain maintenance, or relative lack of age-related brain pathology. Through another path, successful memory aging can be accomplished despite brain pathology by means of efficient compensatory and strategic processes. Genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors influence memory aging via both paths. Some of these factors can be promoted throughout the life course, which, at the individual as well as the societal level, can positively impact successful memory aging.

Keywords
successful memory aging, brain maintenance, lifestyle, genetics
National Category
Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152056 (URN)10.1146/annurev-psych-010418-103052 (DOI)000456388300010 ()29949727 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Stillesjö, S., Eriksson, J., Juslin, P. & Nyberg, L. (2018). A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 481.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One important distinction in psychology is between inferences based on associative memory and inferences based on analysis and rules. Much previous empirical work conceive of associative and analytical processes as two exclusive ways of addressing a judgment task, where only one process is selected and engaged at a time, in an either-or fashion. However, related work indicate that the processes are better understood as being in interplay and simultaneously engaged. Based on computational modeling and brain imaging of spontaneously adopted judgment strategies together with analyses of brain activity elicited in tasks where participants were explicitly instructed to perform similarity-based associative judgments or rule-based judgments (n = 74), we identified brain regions related to the two types of processes. We observed considerable overlap in activity patterns. The precuneus was activated for both types of judgments, and its activity predicted how well a similarity-based model fit the judgments. Activity in the superior frontal gyrus predicted the fit of a rule-based judgment model. The results suggest the precuneus as a key node for similarity-based judgments, engaged both when overt responses are guided by similarity-based and rule-based processes. These results are interpreted such that similarity-based processes are engaged in parallel to rule-based-processes, a finding with direct implications for cognitive theories of judgment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
judgment and decision-making, fMRI, exemplar model, multiple-cue judgment, cognitive model
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154869 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00481 (DOI)000453235900001 ()2-s2.0-85058995922 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Kaufmann, T., van der Meer, D., Doan, N. T., Schwarz, E., Lund, M. J., Agartz, I., . . . Westlye, L. T. (2018). Brain Disorders are Associated With Increased Brain Age. Paper presented at 73rd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 10-12, 2017, New York, NY. Biological Psychiatry, 83(9), S238-S239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain Disorders are Associated With Increased Brain Age
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2018 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 83, no 9, p. S238-S239Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Brain Age, Structural Brain Imaging, Brain Disorders, Heritability, Life-Span Trajectories
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148740 (URN)000433001900016 ()
Conference
73rd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 10-12, 2017, New York, NY
Note

Supplement: S, Meeting Abstract: F5

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, L. (2018). Cognitive control in the prefrontal cortex: a central or distributed executive?. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 59(1), 62-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive control in the prefrontal cortex: a central or distributed executive?
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 62-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive control is the foundation for attaining goals by flexible adaptation of action to changing environmental demands. It has been hypothesized to be critically dependent upon the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In this mini-review, evidence for domain-general versus domain-specific cognitive control is examined, with a particular focus on attention and memory. The reviewed studies examined different levels of cognitive control in relation to performance and patterns of brain activity, and a few included direct comparisons of cognitive-control modulations across cognitive domains. Within domains, increased demands on cognitive control consistently translated into increased PFC activity, but limited overlap in recruited PFC regions was observed between domains. It is concluded that the PFC supports multiple cognitive-control systems that collectively may be conceived of as a distributed executive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
Cognition, cognitive control, prefrontal cortex, executive functions, central executive, top-down, SPOSITO M, 1995, NATURE, V378, P279 ncan J, 2001, NATURE REVIEWS NEUROSCIENCE, V2, P820 gdahl Kenneth, 1995, P123 beza R, 2000, JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE, V12, P1 rklund P., 2007, NEUROIMAGE, V36, P1361 hlin Erika, 2008, SCIENCE, V320, P1510 ddeley A, 2003, NATURE REVIEWS NEUROSCIENCE, V4, P829 yake A, 2000, COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY11th Annual Convention of the American-Psychological- ciety, JUN, 1999, DENVER, COLORADO, V41, P49 ytek Bradley, 2015, NATURE NEUROSCIENCE, V18, P1318 omsen T, 2004, NEUROIMAGE, V22, P912 en Ashley C., 2013, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145793 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12409 (DOI)000426038300008 ()29356013 (PubMedID)
Note

Special Issue

Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wallin, A., Kettunen, P., Johansson, P. M., Jonsdottir, I. H., Nilsson, C., Nilsson, M., . . . Kuhn, H. G. (2018). Cognitive medicine: a new approach in health care science. BMC Psychiatry, 18, Article ID 42.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive medicine: a new approach in health care science
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2018 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The challenges of today's society call for more knowledge about how to maintain all aspects of cognitive health, such as speed/attention, memory/learning, visuospatial ability, language, executive capacity and social cognition during the life course. Main text: Medical advances have improved treatments of numerous diseases, but the cognitive implications have not been sufficiently addressed. Disability induced by cognitive dysfunction is also a major issue in groups of patients not suffering from Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. Recent studies indicate that several negative lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of cognitive impairment, but intervention and prevention strategies have not been implemented. Disability due to cognitive failure among the workforce has become a major challenge. Globally, the changing aging pyramid results in increased prevalence of cognitive disorders, and the diversity of cultures influences the expression, manifestation and consequences of cognitive dysfunction. Conclusions: Major tasks in the field of cognitive medicine are basic neuroscience research to uncover diverse disease mechanisms, determinations of the prevalence of cognitive dysfunction, health-economical evaluations, and intervention studies. Raising awareness for cognitive medicine as a clinical topic would also highlight the importance of specialized health care units for an integrative approach to the treatment of cognitive dysfunctions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Neurocognitive disorders, Classification of diseases, Disability, Rehabilitation, Mental functions, arning and memory, Executive control, Societal challenge, Stress and environment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145373 (URN)10.1186/s12888-018-1615-0 (DOI)000424707400003 ()29422020 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
van der Meer, D., Kaufmann, T., Cordova-Palomera, A., Bettella, F., Frei, O., Doan, N. T., . . . Westlye, L. T. (2018). Genetic Architecture of Hippocampal Subfield Volumes: Shared and Specific Influences. Paper presented at 73rd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 10-12, 2017, New York, NY. Biological Psychiatry, 83(9), S257-S257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Architecture of Hippocampal Subfield Volumes: Shared and Specific Influences
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2018 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 83, no 9, p. S257-S257Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Hippocampal Subfields, Brain Volumes, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genetic Correlation, hizophrenia
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148737 (URN)000433001900061 ()
Conference
73rd Annual Scientific Convention and Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry (SOBP), MAY 10-12, 2017, New York, NY
Note

Supplement: S, Meeting Abstract: F50

Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
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