umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gorzsás, András
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Wojciechowska, A., Janczak, J., Rojek, T., Gorzsás, A., Malik-Gajewska, M. & Duczmal, M. (2019). Isothiocyanate controlled architecture, spectroscopic, and magnetic behavior of copper(II) l-arginine complexes. Journal of coordination chemistry (Print)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isothiocyanate controlled architecture, spectroscopic, and magnetic behavior of copper(II) l-arginine complexes
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of coordination chemistry (Print), ISSN 0095-8972, E-ISSN 1029-0389Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

We synthesized an l-arginine complex with the formula [Cu(l-Arg)(2)(NCS)](NCS)H2O (1) (l-Arg = l-arginine). Two cis-chelated l-arginine zwitterions form the basal plane, while the weakly N-bonded isothiocyanate is located at the apex of the distorted square pyramidal structure (=0.143). The non-coordinated NCS- anions held layers together in a 3-D supramolecular network. The crystal structure, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Raman, NIR-Vis-UV, EPR) and magnetic properties of 1 have been compared with [Cu(l-Arg)(NCS)(2)] (2). For 1, two absorptions are observed for (C=N) stretching vibrations, corresponding to NCS- ions N-bonded to the central Cu(II) (2077cm(-1)) and in the lattice (2057cm(-1)). In 2 a single band is observed at 2102cm(-1), indicating equivalent NCS- ions in the structure. The EPR spectra of complexes show anisotropic signal with g(perpendicular to) and g(||) 2.062, 2.235 (1), and 2.08, 2.225 (2) characteristic for cis-N2O2 and N3O donor sets in the xy plane, respectively. The unpaired electron mainly occupies the d(x2-y2) orbital, also confirmed by the single envelope of d-d bands at ca. 16,000cm(-1) for 1 and 16,500cm(-1) for 2. The magnetic properties ofcompounds are characteristic of a very weak antiferromagnetic interaction with J=-0.055cm(-1) and J=-0.096cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. [GRAPHICS] .

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Copper(II), L-arginine, isothiocyanate, crystal structure, FT-IR spectra, Raman spectra, NIR-Vis-UV electronic spectra, EPR spectra, magnetism
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158579 (URN)10.1080/00958972.2019.1597065 (DOI)000464620900001 ()
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Felten, J., Vahala, J., Love, J., Gorzsás, A., Ruggeberg, M., Delhomme, N., . . . Sundberg, B. (2018). Ethylene signaling induces gelatinous layers with typical features of tension wood in hybrid aspen. New Phytologist, 218(3), 999-1014
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethylene signaling induces gelatinous layers with typical features of tension wood in hybrid aspen
Show others...
2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 218, no 3, p. 999-1014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The phytohormone ethylene impacts secondary stem growth in plants by stimulating cambial activity, xylem development and fiber over vessel formation. We report the effect of ethylene on secondary cell wall formation and the molecular connection between ethylene signaling and wood formation. We applied exogenous ethylene or its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to wild-type and ethylene-insensitive hybrid aspen trees (Populus tremulaxtremuloides) and studied secondary cell wall anatomy, chemistry and ultrastructure. We furthermore analyzed the transcriptome (RNA Seq) after ACC application to wild-type and ethylene-insensitive trees. We demonstrate that ACC and ethylene induce gelatinous layers (G-layers) and alter the fiber cell wall cellulose microfibril angle. G-layers are tertiary wall layers rich in cellulose, typically found in tension wood of aspen trees. A vast majority of transcripts affected by ACC are downstream of ethylene perception and include a large number of transcription factors (TFs). Motif-analyses reveal potential connections between ethylene TFs (Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3-LIKE1 (EIN3/EIL1)) and wood formation. G-layer formation upon ethylene application suggests that the increase in ethylene biosynthesis observed during tension wood formation is important for its formation. Ethylene-regulated TFs of the ERF and EIN3/EIL1 type could transmit the ethylene signal.

Keywords
cell wall, ethylene signaling, gelatinous layer (G-layer), hybrid aspen, tension wood, transcriptome
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147450 (URN)10.1111/nph.15078 (DOI)000430127000016 ()29528503 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 213-2011-1148Swedish Research Council Formas, 239-2011-1915
Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, A., Krais, A. M., Gorzsás, A., Lundh, T. & Gerde, P. (2018). Isolation and characterization of a respirable particle fraction from residential house-dust. Environmental Research, 161, 284-290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolation and characterization of a respirable particle fraction from residential house-dust
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 161, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Indoor air pollution has caused increasing concern in recent years. As we spend most of our lives indoors, it is crucial to understand the health effects caused by indoor air pollution. Household dust serve as good proxy for accessing indoor air pollution, especially smaller dust particles that can pass into the lungs are of interest. In this study we present an efficient method for the isolation of dust particles in the respirable size range. The respirable fraction was recovered from vacuum cleaner bags, separated by stepwise sieving, followed by characterization for size, morphology, surface area, organic content and elemental composition. The respirable fraction was obtained in a yield of 0.6% with a specific surface area of 2.5 m(2)/g and a Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter of 3.73 +/- 0.15 mu m. Aluminum and zink were the dominating metals measured in the dust, whereas the major mineral components were found to be silicon dioxide and calcium carbonate. The fraction of organic matter in the dust was measured to be 69 +/- 1%. The organic matrix contained bacterial and fungi and a presence of skin fragments. We present here an efficient and fast method for the isolation of dust particles in the respirable size range. That is of considerable value due to the need for large quantities of respirable particle fractions to conduct toxicological studies and risk assessment work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science, 2018
Keywords
Indoor air, House dust, Respirable, Inhalation, Health, Particle characterization
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145162 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2017.10.049 (DOI)000423654100032 ()29172162 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ferro, L., Gorzsás, A., Gentili, F. G. & Funk, C. (2018). Subarctic microalgal strains treat wastewater and produce biomass at low temperature and short photoperiod. Algal Research, 35, 160-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subarctic microalgal strains treat wastewater and produce biomass at low temperature and short photoperiod
2018 (English)In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 35, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Northern countries, microalgal-based processes are challenging due to low light and temperature conditions during a significant part of the year. Three natural strains from Northern Sweden (Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus sp., Desmodesmus sp.) and a collection strain (Scenedesmus obliquus UTEX 417) were cultured in municipal wastewater, comparing their performances, biomass composition and nutrients removal under continuous light at standard (25 °C) and low temperature (5 °C), short photoperiod (3 h light, 25 °C), or moderate winter conditions (6 h light, 15 °C). Only the natural strains grew at low temperature, highly consuming total nitrogen and phosphate (>80% and >70%, respectively) even during cold- and dark-stress. At reduced growth rates, C. vulgaris and Scenedesmus sp. produced similar amounts of biomass (>1 g/l) as in standard conditions. Scenedesmus sp. and Desmodesmus sp. showed phenotypic plasticity and increased carbohydrate content. Short photoperiod strongly reduced growth rates, biomass and storage compounds and induced flocculation in C. vulgaris.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Subarctic climate, Microalgae, Wastewater treatment, Temperature, Photoperiod
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153114 (URN)10.1016/j.algal.2018.08.031 (DOI)000447187700016 ()2-s2.0-85052483715 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Reyes, D. C., Gorzsas, A., Stridh, K., de Wit, P. & Sundman, O. (2017). Alkalization of dissolving cellulose pulp with highly concentrated caustic at low NaOH stoichiometric excess. Carbohydrate Polymers, 165, 213-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alkalization of dissolving cellulose pulp with highly concentrated caustic at low NaOH stoichiometric excess
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 165, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a quantitative study, using Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate data analysis, to determine the degree of activation of softwood sulphite dissolving cellulose pulp by aqueous sodium hydroxide. We have chosen industrially relevant conditions, including low stoichiometric ratio of NaOH/Anhydroglucose Unit (AGU) <2 and highly concentrated caustic (>= 45% w/w [NaOH]). A design of experiments is used to investigate the effects of simultaneous variation of a set of key parameters on the degree of activation (i.e. transformation to alkali cellulose, denoted as DoA): (a) the NaOH/AGU stoichiometric ratio, denoted (r); (b) the concentration of NaOH, denoted [NaOH]; (c) temperature, denoted (T); and (d) reaction time, denoted (t). Solid-state C-13 CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy was applied to investigate the reproducibility of the experiments and to select the range for (t). According to the model, (r) is found to have a statistically significant effect on DoA (increasing from DoA= 6-30% at the lowest (r)=0.8, to DoA= 48-87% at the highest (r)=1.8), together with [NaOH]. The influence of [NaOH] depends strongly on (r). The other studied variables are found to be insignificant in the model and has a complicated influence on the activation. In particular, (T) is found to be unimportant in the studied range (30-60 degrees C), but increasing (t) from 5 to 25 min shows a positive influence on DoA, depending on both (r) and [NaOH]. A mercerisation mechanism that is controlled by diffusion is proposed to explain these phenomena. 

National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134689 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2017.02.045 (DOI)000399261900024 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Nord, C., Eriksson, M., Dicker, A., Eriksson, A., Grong, E., Ilegems, E., . . . Ahlgren, U. (2017). Biochemical profiling of diabetes disease progression by multivariate vibrational microspectroscopy of the pancreas. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 6646.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biochemical profiling of diabetes disease progression by multivariate vibrational microspectroscopy of the pancreas
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the dramatic increase in the prevalence of diabetes, techniques for in situ studies of the underlying pancreatic biochemistry are lacking. Such methods would facilitate obtaining mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and aid in prognostic and/or diagnostic assessments. In this report we demonstrate how a multivariate imaging approach (orthogonal projections to latent structures - discriminant analysis) can be applied to generate full vibrational microspectroscopic profiles of pancreatic tissues. These profiles enable extraction of known and previously unrecorded biochemical alterations in models of diabetes, and allow for classification of the investigated tissue with regards to tissue type, strain and stage of disease progression. Most significantly, the approach provided evidence for dramatic alterations of the pancreatic biochemistry at the initial onset of immune-infiltration in the Non Obese Diabetic model for type 1 diabetes. Further, it enabled detection of a previously undocumented accumulation of collagen fibrils in the leptin deficient ob/ob mouse islets. By generating high quality spectral profiles through the tissue capsule of hydrated human pancreata and by in vivo Raman imaging of pancreatic islets transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye, we provide critical feasibility studies for the translation of this technique to diagnostic assessments of pancreatic biochemistry in vivo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138420 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-07015-z (DOI)000406366000004 ()
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gillgren, T. & Gorzsás, A. (2016). A one-pot set-up for real-time reaction monitoring by FTIR spectroscopy. Wood Science and Technology, 50(3), 567-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A one-pot set-up for real-time reaction monitoring by FTIR spectroscopy
2016 (English)In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 567-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a method for monitoring solution reactions in real time using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Compared to batch measurements or flow-through systems, where the reaction and spectroscopic measurements are spatially and temporarily separated, this method enables continuous FTIR spectroscopic measurements of reactions without delay and directly in the reaction vessel. The strengths are demonstrated, and the limitations of the method are highlighted using the reaction of a lignin model compound and a sulphite salt. The method is capable of identifying both kinetic and thermodynamic properties (e.g. reaction speed, intermediate species), allowing rapid and cost-effective optimisation of reaction parameters. While specificity can be limited, the non-destructive nature of the method facilitates direct coupling to other techniques to help resolve potential ambiguities. The method is of general interest in wet chemistry applications and in several areas of the lignocellulosic biomass field in particular, as it can provide new insights into natural and industrial reactions and processes.

National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120621 (URN)10.1007/s00226-016-0801-9 (DOI)000373743300009 ()
Available from: 2016-08-16 Created: 2016-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Normark, M., Pommer, L., Gräsvik, J., Hedenström, M., Gorzsas, A., Winestrand, S. & Jönsson, L. J. (2016). Biochemical Conversion of Torrefied Norway Spruce After Pretreatment with Acid or Ionic Liquid. Bioenergy Research, 9(1), 355-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biochemical Conversion of Torrefied Norway Spruce After Pretreatment with Acid or Ionic Liquid
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Bioenergy Research, ISSN 1939-1234, E-ISSN 1939-1242, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 355-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chemical effects of torrefaction and the possibility to combine torrefaction with biochemical conversion were explored in experiments with five preparations of wood of Norway spruce that had been torrefied using different degrees of severity. Compositional analysis and analyses using solid-state CP/MAS C-13 NMR, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Py-GC/MS showed small gradual changes, such as decreased hemicellulosic content and increased Klason lignin value, for torrefaction conditions in the range from 260 A degrees C and 8 min up to 310 A degrees C and 8 min. The most severe torrefaction conditions (310 A degrees C, 25 min) resulted in substantial loss of glucan and further increase of the Klason lignin value, which was attributed to conversion of carbohydrate to pseudo-lignin. Even mild torrefaction conditions led to decreased susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, a state which was not changed by pretreatment with sulfuric acid. Pretreatment with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate overcame the additional recalcitrance caused by torrefaction, and the glucose yields after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis of wood torrefied at 260 A degrees C for 8 min and at 285 A degrees C for 16.5 min were as high as that of IL-pretreated non-torrefied spruce wood. Compared to IL-pretreated non-torrefied reference wood, the glucose production rates after 2 h of enzymatic hydrolysis of IL-pretreated wood torrefied at 260 A degrees C for 8 min and at 285 A degrees C for 16.5 min were 63 and 40 % higher, respectively. The findings offer increased understanding of the effects of torrefaction and indicate that mild torrefaction is compatible with biochemical conversion after pretreatment with alternative solvents that disrupt pseudo-lignin-containing lignocellulose.

Keywords
Torrefaction, Wood, Acid pretreatment, Ionic liquid, Enzymatic hydrolysis
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118386 (URN)10.1007/s12155-015-9698-7 (DOI)000370816300032 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Sheng, M., Gorzsás, A. & Tuck, S. (2016). Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy for the analysis of the biochemical composition of C. elegans worms. Worm, 5(1), Article ID e1132978.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy for the analysis of the biochemical composition of C. elegans worms
2016 (English)In: Worm, E-ISSN 2162-4054, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e1132978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in intermediary metabolism have profound effects on many aspects of C. elegans biology including growth, development and behavior. However, many traditional biochemical techniques for analyzing chemical composition require relatively large amounts of starting material precluding the analysis of mutants that cannot be grown in large amounts as homozygotes. Here we describe a technique for detecting changes in the chemical compositions of C. elegans worms by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. We demonstrate that the technique can be used to detect changes in the relative levels of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in one and the same worm. We suggest that Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy represents a useful addition to the arsenal of techniques for metabolic studies of C. elegans worms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
C. elegans, carbohydrate, composition, Fourier transform infrared, lipid, microspectroscopy, protein
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111049 (URN)10.1080/21624054.2015.1132978 (DOI)27073735 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form, with the title "Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy for the analysis of the biochemical composition of C. elegans".

Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Serk, H., Gorzsás, A., Tuominen, H. & Pesquet, E. (2015). Cooperative lignification of xylem tracheary elements. Plant Signalling & Behavior, 10(4), Article ID e1003753.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperative lignification of xylem tracheary elements
2015 (English)In: Plant Signalling & Behavior, ISSN 1559-2316, E-ISSN 1559-2324, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e1003753Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) – the hydro-mineral sap conducting cells - has been an evolutionary breakthrough to enable long distance nutrition and upright growth of vascular land plants. To allow sap conduction, TEs form hollow laterally reinforced cylinders by combining programmed cell death and secondary cell wall formation. To ensure their structural resistance for sap conduction, TE cell walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin, which is deposited after TE cell death by the cooperative supply of monomers and other substrates from the surrounding living cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keywords
lignin, non-cell autonomous process, post-mortem lignification, secondary cell wall, tracheary elements, xylem/wood vessels
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108895 (URN)10.1080/15592324.2014.1003753 (DOI)000362317900003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-4620
Available from: 2015-09-21 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications