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Fonseca Rodriguez, O., Häggström Lundevaller, E., Sheridan, S. C. & Schumann, B. (2019). Association between Weather Types based on the Spatial Synoptic Classification and All-Cause Mortality in Sweden, 1991⁻2014. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(10), Article ID 1696.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between Weather Types based on the Spatial Synoptic Classification and All-Cause Mortality in Sweden, 1991⁻2014
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 10, article id 1696Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much is known about the adverse health impact of high and low temperatures. The Spatial Synoptic Classification is a useful tool for assessing weather effects on health because it considers the combined effect of meteorological factors rather than temperature only. The aim of this study was to assess the association between oppressive weather types and daily total mortality in Sweden. Time-series Poisson regression with distributed lags was used to assess the relationship between oppressive weather (Dry Polar, Dry Tropical, Moist Polar, and Moist Tropical) and daily deaths over 14 days in the extended summer (May to September), and 28 days during the extended winter (November to March), from 1991 to 2014. Days not classified as oppressive weather served as the reference category. We computed relative risks with 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for trends and seasonality. Results of the southern (Skåne and Stockholm) and northern (Jämtland and Västerbotten) locations were pooled using meta-analysis for regional-level estimates. Analyses were performed using the dlnm and mvmeta packages in R. During summer, in the South, the Moist Tropical and Dry Tropical weather types increased the mortality at lag 0 through lag 3 and lag 6, respectively. Moist Polar weather was associated with mortality at longer lags. In the North, Dry Tropical weather increased the mortality at shorter lags. During winter, in the South, Dry Polar and Moist Polar weather increased mortality from lag 6 to lag 10 and from lag 19 to lag 26, respectively. No effect of oppressive weather was found in the North. The effect of oppressive weather types in Sweden varies across seasons and regions. In the North, a small study sample reduces precision of estimates, while in the South, the effect of oppressive weather types is more evident in both seasons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Spatial Synoptic Classification, Sweden, all-cause mortality, distributed lag non-linear models, oppressive weather types
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159094 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16101696 (DOI)31091805 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, FR-2017/0009
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Furberg, M., Anticona Huaynate, C. & Schumann, B. (2019). Post-infectious fatigue following Puumala virus infection. Infectious Diseases, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-infectious fatigue following Puumala virus infection
2019 (English)In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Puumala virus infection or nephropathia epidemica (NE) is common in northern Sweden. NE causes haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Most patients make a full recovery, but a convalescent phase with fatigue has been reported. Although post-infectious fatigue has been demonstrated for other viral infections, it is not well studied in relation to NE. This study assessed recovery time and levels of fatigue in former NE patients, as compared to the general population.

METHODS: NE patients diagnosed in northern Sweden between 2007 and 2011, together with a comparison sample from the general population, answered a questionnaire on demographic and health-related factors, including the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and characteristics of NE infection. Self-reported recovery time was assessed, and fatigue levels were compared across the two groups by multiple linear regression, stratified by gender.

RESULTS: In total, 1132 NE patients and 915 comparison group subjects participated. Time to complete recovery was reported to exceed 3 months for 47% and 6 months for 32% of the NE patients. Recovery time differed by gender and age. NE patients had significantly higher FSS scores than the comparison group. Differences were greater among women than men, and adjustments for current illness, body mass index, smoking and current residence only slightly modified the estimates.

CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with previous NE infection show higher fatigue scores than non-infected individuals, even 5 years following the infection. Full recovery takes half a year or longer for a substantial proportion of former NE patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Northern Sweden, Puumala virus, nephropathia epidemica, post-infectious fatigue, recovery time
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159095 (URN)10.1080/23744235.2019.1605191 (DOI)000469658200001 ()31081420 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17
Lena, K., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2019). Season of birth, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality in Sweden: the Sami and non-Sami population, 1800–1899. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 78(1), Article ID 1629784.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Season of birth, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality in Sweden: the Sami and non-Sami population, 1800–1899
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 78, no 1, article id 1629784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seasonal patterns of neonatal mortality and stillbirths have been found around the world. However, little is known about the association between season of birth and infant mortality of pre-industrial societies in a subarctic environment. In this study, we compared how season of birth affected the neonatal and stillbirth risk among the Sami and non-Sami in Swedish Sápmi during the nineteenth century. Using digitised parish records from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, we applied logistic regression models for estimating the association of season of birth with stillbirths and neonatal mortality, respectively. Higher neonatal mortality was found among the winter- and autumn-born Sami, compared to summer-born infants. Stillbirth risk was higher during autumn compared to summer among the Sami, whereas we found no seasonal differences in mortality among the non-Sami population. We relate the higher neonatal mortality risk among winter-born Sami to differences in seasonality of living conditions associated with reindeer herding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
neonatal mortality; season of birth; indigenous population, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160496 (URN)10.1080/22423982.2019.1629784 (DOI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P0033:1
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Lena, K., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2019). The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800–1895. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1623609.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800–1895
2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1623609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies in which the association between temperature and neonatal mortality (deaths during the first 28 days of life) is tracked over extended periods that cover demographic, economic and epidemiological transitions are quite limited. From previous research about the demographic transition in Swedish Sápmi, we know that infant and child mortality was generally higher among the indigenous (Sami) population compared to non-indigenous populations.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between extreme temperatures and neonatal mortality among the Sami and non-Sami population in Swedish Sápmi (Lapland) during the nineteenth century.

Methods: Data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, were used to identify neonatal deaths. We used monthly mean temperature in Tornedalen and identified cold and warm month (5th and 95th) percentiles. Monthly death counts from extreme temperatures were modelled using negative binomial regression. We computed relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for time trends and seasonality.

Results: Overall, the neonatal mortality rate was higher among Sami compared to non-Sami infants (62/1,000 vs 35/1,000 live births), although the differences between the two populations decreased after 1860. For the Sami population prior 1860, the results revealed a higher neonatal incidence rate during cold winter months (< -15.4 °C, RR=1.60, CI 1.14–2.23) compared to infants born during months of medium temperature). No association was found between extreme cold months and neonatal mortality for non-Sami populations. Warm months (+15.1 °C) had no impact on Sami or non-Sami populations.

Conclusions: This study revealed the role of environmental factors (temperature extremes) on infant health during the demographic transition where cold extremes mainly affected the Sami population. Ethnicity and living conditions contributed to differential weather vulnerability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
neonatal mortality, temperature, seasonality, preindustrial societies, indigenous populations, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159307 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1623609 (DOI)000472604700001 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P17-0033:1
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-07-12Bibliographically approved
Schumann, B., Kinsman, J. & Lindvall, K. (2018). ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Ethiopia country report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Ethiopia country report
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 24
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162172 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Schumann, B., Kinsman, J. & Lindvall, K. (2018). ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Kenya country report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Kenya country report
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 25
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162171 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Schumann, B., Kinsman, J. & Lindvall, K. (2018). ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Somalia country report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Somalia country report
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 23
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162170 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Odhiambo Sewe, M., Bunker, A., Ingole, V., Egondi, T., Oudin Åström, D., Hondula, D. M., . . . Schumann, B. (2018). Estimated Effect of Temperature on Years of Life Lost: A Retrospective Time-Series Study of Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Regions. Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, 126(1), Article ID 017004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimated Effect of Temperature on Years of Life Lost: A Retrospective Time-Series Study of Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Regions
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 126, no 1, article id 017004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have reported a strong association between temperature and mortality. Additional insights can be gained from investigating the effects of temperature on years of life lost (YLL), considering the life expectancy at the time of death.

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this work was to assess the association between temperature and YLL at seven low-, middle-, and high-income sites.

METHODS: We obtained meteorological and population data for at least nine years from four Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites in Kenya (western Kenya, Nairobi), Burkina Faso (Nouna), and India (Vadu), as well as data from cities in the United States (Philadelphia, Phoenix) and Sweden (Stockholm). A distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the association of daily maximum temperature and daily YLL, lagged 0-14 d. The reference value was set for each site at the temperature with the lowest YLL.

RESULTS: Generally, YLL increased with higher temperature, starting day 0. In Nouna, the hottest location, with a minimum YLL temperature at the first percentile, YLL increased consistently with higher temperatures. In Vadu, YLL increased in association with heat, whereas in Nairobi, YLL increased in association with both low and high temperatures. Associations with cold and heat were evident for Phoenix (stronger for heat), Stockholm, and Philadelphia (both stronger for cold). Patterns of associations with mortality were generally similar to those with YLL.

CONCLUSIONS: Both high and low temperatures are associated with YLL in high-, middle-, and low-income countries. Policy guidance and health adaptation measures might be improved with more comprehensive indicators of the health burden of high and low temperatures such as YLL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144197 (URN)10.1289/EHP1745 (DOI)000424212100010 ()29342452 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Benebo, F. O., Schumann, B. & Vaezghasemi, M. (2018). Intimate partner violence against women in Nigeria: a multilevel study investigating the effect of women's status and community norms. BMC Women's Health, 18, Article ID 136.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intimate partner violence against women in Nigeria: a multilevel study investigating the effect of women's status and community norms
2018 (English)In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 18, article id 136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women has been recognised as a public health problem with far-reaching consequences for the physical, reproductive, and mental health of women. The ecological framework portrays intimate partner violence as a multifaceted phenomenon, demonstrating the interplay of factors at different levels: individual, community, and the larger society. The present study examined the effect of individual- and community-level factors on IPV in Nigeria, with a focus on women's status and community-level norms among men.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study based on the latest Nigerian Demographic Health Survey (2013) was conducted involving 20,802 ever-partnered women aged 15-49 years. Several multilevel logistic regression models were calibrated to assess the association of individual- and community-level factors with IPV. Both measures of association (fixed effect) and measures of variations (random effect) were reported.

RESULTS: Almost one in four women in Nigeria reported having ever experienced intimate partner violence. Having adjusted for other relevant covariates, higher women's status reduced the odds of IPV (OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.32-0.71). However, community norms among men that justified IPV against women modified the observed protective effect of higher women's status against IPV and reversed the odds (OR = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.26-2.83).

CONCLUSIONS: Besides women's status, community norms towards IPV are an important factor for the occurrence of IPV. Thus, addressing intimate partner violence against women calls for community-wide approaches aimed at changing norms among men alongside improving women's status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Community norms, Intimate partner violence, Multilevel analysis, Nigeria, women’s status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150594 (URN)10.1186/s12905-018-0628-7 (DOI)000441123800001 ()30092785 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Bergmann, A., Bolm-Audorff, U., Ditchen, D., Ellegast, R., Grifka, J., Haerting, J., . . . Seidler, A. (2017). Do occupational risks for low back pain differ from risks for specific lumbar disc diseases?: Results of the German Lumbar Spine Study (EPILIFT). Spine, 42(20), E1204-E1211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do occupational risks for low back pain differ from risks for specific lumbar disc diseases?: Results of the German Lumbar Spine Study (EPILIFT)
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2017 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 42, no 20, p. E1204-E1211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design: A multicenter, population based, case-control study.

Objective: The aim of the present analysis is to clarify potential differences in the "occupational risk profiles" of structural lumbar disc diseases on the one hand, and low back pain (LBP) on the other hand.

Summary of background data: Physical workplace factors seem to play an important etiological role.

Methods: We recruited 901 patients with structural lumbar disc diseases (disc herniation or severe disc space narrowing) and 233 control subjects with "low-back-pain." Both groups were compared with 422 "low-back pain free" control subjects. Case history, pain data, neurological deficits, and movement restrictions were documented. LBP was recorded by the Nordic questionnaire on musculoskeletal symptoms. All magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and X-rays were inspected by an independent study radiologist. The calculation of cumulative physical workload was based on a computer-assisted interview and a biomechanical analysis by 3-D-dynamic simulation tool. Occupational exposures were documented for the whole working life.

Results: We found a positive dose-response relationship between cumulative lumbar load and LBP among men, but not among women. Physical occupational risks for structural lumbar disc diseases [odds ratio (OR) 3.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.3-6.0] are higher than for LBP (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.0-3.5).

Conclusion: Our finding points to potentially different etiological pathways in the heterogeneous disease group of LBP. Results suggest that not all of the structural disc damage arising from physical workload leads to LBP.

Keywords
etiologic factor, disc narrowing, dose-response relationship, low back pain, lumbar disc disease, lumbar disc herniation, occupational risks, physical workload, physical workplace factors
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143690 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000002296 (DOI)000423055900007 ()28658034 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Climate, social and demographic change and disease in Sweden during three hundred years [P12-1312:1_RJ]; Umeå UniversityWhat´s the weather got to do with it? - Infant mortality in Northern Sweden during the demographic transition [P17-0033:1_RJ]; Umeå University; Publications
Lena, K., Häggström Lundevaller, E. & Schumann, B. (2019). The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800–1895. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1623609.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9722-0370

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