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Jönsson, Leif J.
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Publications (10 of 75) Show all publications
Chen, G., Wu, G., Chen, L., Wang, W., Hong, F. F. & Jönsson, L. J. (2019). Comparison of productivity and quality of bacterial nanocellulose synthesized using culture media based on seven sugars from biomass. Microbial Biotechnology, 12(4), 677-687
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of productivity and quality of bacterial nanocellulose synthesized using culture media based on seven sugars from biomass
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2019 (English)In: Microbial Biotechnology, ISSN 1751-7907, E-ISSN 1751-7915, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 677-687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Komagataeibacter xylinus ATCC 23770 was statically cultivated in eight culture media based on different carbon sources, viz. seven biomass‐derived sugars and one sugar mixture. The productivity and quality of the bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) produced in the different media were compared. Highest volumetric productivity, yield on consumed sugar, viscometric degree of polymerization (DPv, 4350–4400) and thermal stability were achieved using media based on glucose or maltose. Growth in media based on xylose, mannose or galactose resulted in lower volumetric productivity and DPv, but in larger fibril diameter and higher crystallinity (76–78%). Growth in medium based on a synthetic sugar mixture resembling the composition of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate promoted BNC productivity and yield, but decreased fibril diameter, DPv, crystallinity and thermal stability. This work shows that volumetric productivity, yield and properties of BNC are highly affected by the carbon source, and indicates how industrially relevant sugar mixtures would affect these characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161700 (URN)10.1111/1751-7915.13401 (DOI)000473648300009 ()30912251 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
The Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Martín, C., Peinemann, J. C., Wei, M., Stagge, S., Xiong, S. & Jönsson, L. J. (2019). Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of de-starched cassava stems for enhancing the enzymatic convertibility and total glucan recovery. Industrial crops and products (Print), 132, 301-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of de-starched cassava stems for enhancing the enzymatic convertibility and total glucan recovery
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2019 (English)In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 132, p. 301-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cassava stems are an abundant feedstock that is becoming attractive for biochemical conversion to fuels and chemicals. Since cassava stems are rich in both cellulose and starch, carefully designed pretreatment and digestion procedures are required for achieving high glucan recovery. In this study, partially de-starched cassava stems resulting from a water extraction stage were hydrolyzed with amylases, and the resulting starch-depleted material was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid, and submitted to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The effects of acid pretreatment on glucan recovery, enzymatic convertibility, and by-product formation were investigated using a Box-Behnken experimental design with temperature (165-195 degrees C), time (5-35 min), and acid concentration (0.2-1.0%) as independent variables. In further experimental series, the time period was extended up to 110 min while maintaining temperature at 195 degrees C and sulfuric acid concentration at 0.6%. Using those conditions, pretreatment for 50 min gave the best results (83.8% enzymatic convertibility of pretreated cellulose, and (similar to)72% overall glucan-to-glucose conversion).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cassava stems, Cellulose hydrolysis, Dilute-Acid pretreatment, Starch hydrolysis
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158564 (URN)10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.02.037 (DOI)000464485400032 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Xiong, S., Martin, C., Eilertsen, L., Wei, M., Myronycheva, O., Larsson, S. H., . . . Jönsson, L. J. (2019). Energy-efficient substrate pasteurisation for combined production of shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) and bioethanol. Bioresource Technology, 274, 65-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy-efficient substrate pasteurisation for combined production of shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) and bioethanol
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2019 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 274, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hot-air (75-100 degrees C) pasteurisation (HAP) of birch-wood-based substrate was compared to conventional autoclaving (steam at 121 degrees C) with regard to shiitake growth and yield, chemical composition of heat-pretreated material and spent mushroom substrate (SMS), enzymatic digestibility of glucan in SMS, and theoretical bioethanol yield. Compared to autoclaving, HAP resulted in faster mycelial growth, earlier fructification, and higher or comparable fruit-body yield. The heat pretreatment methods did not differ regarding the fractions of carbohydrate and lignin in pretreated material and SMS, but HAP typically resulted in lower fractions of extractives. Shiitake cultivation, which reduced the mass fraction of lignin to less than half of the initial without having any major impact on the mass fraction of glucan, enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan about four-fold. The choice of heating method did not affect enzymatic digestibility. Thus, HAP could substitute autoclaving and facilitate combined shiitake mushroom and bioethanol production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Hot-air pasteurisation, Edible fungi, Spent mushroom substrate, Lignin degradation, Enzymatic digestibility
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155627 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.11.071 (DOI)000454610900009 ()30500765 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VINNOVA2013-02015Swedish Research Council, 2016-05104Swedish Research Council, 2017-02705Swedish Research Council, EM P37816Swedish Research Council, P42481Bio4Energy
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Chen, G., Wu, G., Chen, L., Wang, W., Hong, F. F. & Jönsson, L. J. (2019). Performance of nanocellulose-producing bacterial strains in static and agitated cultures with different starting pH. Carbohydrate Polymers, 215, 280-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance of nanocellulose-producing bacterial strains in static and agitated cultures with different starting pH
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2019 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 215, p. 280-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of strain selection and culture conditions on bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) productivity and quality was investigated by using four strains, static and agitated cultures, and an initial pH in the range 4-6. With agitation, strain DHU-ATCC-1 displayed highest productivity [1.14 g/(L x d)]. In static cultures, DHU-ZGD-1186 exhibited superior BNC yield on consumed glucose (0.79 g/g), and lowest by-product formation with respect to gluconic acids [<= 0.07 g/(L x d)]. By-product formation typically decreased in the order gluconic acid > 2-keto-gluconic acid > 5-keto-gluconic acid, and was lowest in cultures with high initial pH. The BNC from DHU-ZGD-1186 exhibited higher average viscometric degree of polymerization (DPv), higher crystallinity index, and higher tear index. In conclusion, both strain selection and cultivation conditions had an impact on BNC productivity and properties. Productivity, DPv, crystallinity, and mechanical strength of BNC from agitated cultures could be similar to or even higher than the corresponding values for static cultures.

Keywords
Komagataeibacter xylinus, Bacterial nanocellulose, Strain comparison, Cultivation conditions, uconic acids, Nanocellulose quality
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158362 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2019.03.080 (DOI)000464112700032 ()30981355 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Obudulu, O., Mähler, N., Skotare, T., Bygdell, J., Abreu, I. N., Ahnlund, M., . . . Tuominen, H. (2018). A multi-omics approach reveals function of Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins in wood formation of​ ​​Populus​​ ​trees. BMC Genomics, 19, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multi-omics approach reveals function of Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins in wood formation of​ ​​Populus​​ ​trees
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2018 (English)In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 19, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs) are highly conserved 32–38 kDa proteins that are involved in membrane trafficking. A systems approach was taken to elucidate function of SCAMPs in wood formation of Populus trees. Phenotypic and multi-omics analyses were performed in woody tissues of transgenic Populus trees carrying an RNAi construct for Populus tremula x tremuloides SCAMP3 (PttSCAMP3;Potri.019G104000).

Results: The woody tissues of the transgenic trees displayed increased amounts of both polysaccharides and lignin oligomers, indicating increased deposition of both the carbohydrate and lignin components of the secondary cell walls. This coincided with a tendency towards increased wood density as well as significantly increased thickness of the suberized cork in the transgenic lines. Multivariate OnPLS (orthogonal projections to latent structures) modeling of five different omics datasets (the transcriptome, proteome, GC-MS metabolome, LC-MS metabolome and pyrolysis-GC/MS metabolome) collected from the secondary xylem tissues of the stem revealed systemic variation in the different variables in the transgenic lines, including changes that correlated with the changes in the secondary cell wall composition. The OnPLS model also identified a rather large number of proteins that were more abundant in the transgenic lines than in the wild type. Several of these were related to secretion and/or endocytosis as well as both primary and secondary cell wall biosynthesis.

Conclusions: Populus SCAMP proteins were shown to influence accumulation of secondary cell wall components, including polysaccharides and phenolic compounds, in the woody tissues of Populus tree stems. Our multi-omics analyses combined with the OnPLS modelling suggest that this function is mediated by changes in membrane trafficking to fine-tune the abundance of cell wall precursors and/or proteins involved in cell wall biosynthesis and transport. The data provides a multi-level source of information for future studies on the function of the SCAMP proteins in plant stem tissues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Protein (SCAMP), Populus, Wood chemistry, Wood density, Biomass, Bioprocessing, Cork, Multi-omics
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143890 (URN)10.1186/s12864-017-4411-1 (DOI)000419232000004 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 232-2009-1698
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Gandla, M. L., Martin, C. & Jönsson, L. J. (2018). Analytical Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Conversion to Biofuels and Bio-Based Chemicals. Energies, 11(11), Article ID 2936.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analytical Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Conversion to Biofuels and Bio-Based Chemicals
2018 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 2936Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignocellulosic feedstocks are an important resource for biorefining of renewables to bio-based fuels, chemicals, and materials. Relevant feedstocks include energy crops, residues from agriculture and forestry, and agro-industrial and forest-industrial residues. The feedstocks differ with respect to their recalcitrance to bioconversion through pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification, which will produce sugars that can be further converted to advanced biofuels and other products through microbial fermentation processes. In analytical enzymatic saccharification, the susceptibility of lignocellulosic samples to pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification is assessed in analytical scale using high-throughput or semi-automated techniques. This type of analysis is particularly relevant for screening of large collections of natural or transgenic varieties of plants that are dedicated to production of biofuels or other bio-based chemicals. In combination with studies of plant physiology and cell wall chemistry, analytical enzymatic saccharification can provide information about the fundamental reasons behind lignocellulose recalcitrance as well as about the potential of collections of plants or different fractions of plants for industrial biorefining. This review is focused on techniques used by researchers for screening the susceptibility of plants to pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification, and advantages and disadvantages that are associated with different approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
lignocellulose, biomass, biofuel, sugar platform, pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, cellulose, analytical scale, high-throughput screening
National Category
Energy Systems Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154970 (URN)10.3390/en11112936 (DOI)000451814000074 ()
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Wu, G., Chen, G., Alriksson, B., Hong, F. F. & Jönsson, L. J. (2018). Bacterial nanocellulose: scale-up of production and use for reinforcement of paper sheets. In: The 8th workshop on cellulose: regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives. Paper presented at The 8th workshop on cellulose, regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, Karlstad, Sweden, November 13-14, 2018 (pp. 33-33). Karlstad ; Umeå: Karlstads universitet ; Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial nanocellulose: scale-up of production and use for reinforcement of paper sheets
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2018 (English)In: The 8th workshop on cellulose: regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, Karlstad ; Umeå: Karlstads universitet ; Umeå universitet , 2018, p. 33-33Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad ; Umeå: Karlstads universitet ; Umeå universitet, 2018
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158040 (URN)
Conference
The 8th workshop on cellulose, regenerated cellulose and cellulose derivatives, Karlstad, Sweden, November 13-14, 2018
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z., Winestrand, S., Gillgren, T. & Jönsson, L. J. (2018). Chemical and structural factors influencing enzymatic saccharification of wood from aspen, birch and spruce. Biomass and Bioenergy, 109, 125-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical and structural factors influencing enzymatic saccharification of wood from aspen, birch and spruce
2018 (English)In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 109, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The susceptibility of untreated and sulfuric-acid-pretreated aspen, birch, and spruce to analytical enzymatic saccharification was studied in relation to their chemical composition and physical-structural features. The analytical data collected covered the mass fractions of lignin, carbohydrates, and extractives, the release of acetic acid, formic acid, and uronic acids by acid and alkaline hydrolysis, crystallinity and crystallite size, syringyl: guaiacyl (S:G) ratio of lignin, cellulose accessibility, FTIR spectra, images from SEM and fluorescence microscopy, and susceptibility to enzymatic saccharification using enzyme mixtures with and without supplementary xylanase.In the absence of pretreatment the mass fraction yield of Glc on the original dry wood in the analytical enzymatic saccharification increased in the order birch (16 g kg−1) < spruce (35 g kg−1) < aspen (150 g kg−1). After acid pretreatment, the order changed to spruce (170 g kg−1) < aspen (290 g kg−1), birch (290 g kg−1). The relatively high recalcitrance of untreated birch was not possible to relate to mass fraction of lignin, S:G ratio, cellulose crystallinity, or mass fraction of acetyl, but rather to structural features, such as a more compact surface structure with high density and low cellulose accessibility. The relatively high sugar yields from both untreated and pretreated aspen suggest that aspen wood is well suited as feedstock for production of liquid biofuels and green chemicals in forest-based biorefineries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Hardwood, Softwood, Chemical composition, Dilute-acid pretreatment, Enzymatic saccharification, Physical structure
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143889 (URN)10.1016/j.biombioe.2017.12.020 (DOI)000424939200015 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Wang, Z. & Jönsson, L. J. (2018). Comparison of catalytically non-productive adsorption of fungal proteins to lignins and pseudo-lignin using isobaric mass tagging. Bioresource Technology, 268, 393-401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of catalytically non-productive adsorption of fungal proteins to lignins and pseudo-lignin using isobaric mass tagging
2018 (English)In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 268, p. 393-401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Catalytically non-productive adsorption of fungal enzymes to pseudo-lignin (PL) was compared to adsorption to lignin preparations derived from different sources (SL, spruce; BL, birch; OL, beech) using different methods [steam pretreatment/enzymatic saccharification (SL, BL) and organosolv processing (OL)]. The protein adsorption to the SL was more extensive than the adsorption to the hardwood lignins, which was relatively similar to the adsorption to the PL. The adsorption patterns of 13 individual proteins were studied using isobaric mass tagging with TMTsixplex reagent and LC-MS/MS analysis. The results suggest that, on an average, adsorption of proteins equipped with carbohydrate-binding modules, such as the cellulases CBHI, EGII, and EGIV, was less dependent on the quality of the lignin/PL than adsorption of other proteins, such as beta-Xyl, Xyn-1, and Xyn-2, which are involved in xylan degradation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Enzyme adsorption, Lignin, Pseudo-lignin, Quantitative proteomics, Isobaric mass tagging
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152373 (URN)10.1016/j.biortech.2018.07.149 (DOI)000445043600049 ()30099290 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Energy AgencyBio4EnergyThe Kempe Foundations
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Ratke, C., Terebieniec, B. K., Winestrand, S., Derba-Maceluch, M., Grahn, T., Schiffthaler, B., . . . Mellerowicz, E. J. (2018). Downregulating aspen xylan biosynthetic GT43 genes in developing wood stimulates growth via reprograming of the transcriptome. New Phytologist, 219(1), 230-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Downregulating aspen xylan biosynthetic GT43 genes in developing wood stimulates growth via reprograming of the transcriptome
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2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, Vol. 219, no 1, p. 230-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Xylan is one of the main compounds determining wood properties in hardwood species. The xylan backbone is thought to be synthesized by a synthase complex comprising two members of the GT43 family. We downregulated all GT43 genes in hybrid aspen (Populus tremulaxtremuloides) to understand their involvement in xylan biosynthesis.

All three clades of the GT43 family were targeted for downregulation using RNA interference individually or in different combinations, either constitutively or specifically in developing wood.

Simultaneous downregulation in developing wood of the B (IRX9) and C (IRX14) clades resulted in reduced xylan Xyl content relative to reducing end sequence, supporting their role in xylan backbone biosynthesis. This was accompanied by a higher lignocellulose saccharification efficiency. Unexpectedly, GT43 suppression in developing wood led to an overall growth stimulation, xylem cell wall thinning and a shift in cellulose orientation. Transcriptome profiling of these transgenic lines indicated that cell cycling was stimulated and secondary wall biosynthesis was repressed. We suggest that the reduced xylan elongation is sensed by the cell wall integrity surveying mechanism in developing wood.

Our results show that wood-specific suppression of xylan-biosynthetic GT43 genes activates signaling responses, leading to increased growth and improved lignocellulose saccharification.

Keywords
cellulose microfibril angle, GT43, Populus, saccharification, secondary wall, wood development, xylan biosynthesis
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150384 (URN)10.1111/nph.15160 (DOI)000434153200026 ()29708593 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046148362 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
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