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Vaino, K., Vaino, T. & Ottander, C. (2018). Designing an ice cream making device: a design-based science learning approach. Science Education International, 29(3), 149-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an ice cream making device: a design-based science learning approach
2018 (English)In: Science Education International, ISSN 1450-104X, E-ISSN 2077-2327, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 149-162Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, middle school students’ (8th grade, n = 24) problem-solving processes were investigated while implementing a design-based science learning (DBSL) approach. DBSL tries to incorporate science learning with the processes of engineering design. A DBSL module was developed by the research team within which students were expected to design an ice cream making device from simple and easily available materials. The goals of the study were: (a) To develop an understanding of the processes of student design including difficulties they face within the DBSL setting; (b) to determine how science knowledge was used by students in a design situation; and (c) to explore how student design processes and design products can be characterized and eventually, assessed. Data were gathered from students’ written reports, video-recorded classroom observations, and teachers’ oral feedback. The findings reveal that the crucial aspects for design success were the students’ understanding of the scientific phenomena, the operational principles behind the ice cream making device, and the understanding of the design criteria. Lack of one or more led to unrealistic design ideas. The initial difficulties were overcome by peer support, teacher guidance, and trial and error experiences. A set of assessment criteria, able to characterize student design products, were developed. As a result of this study, practical guidelines for curriculum developers and teachers on how to facilitate further implementation of DBSL in the classroom are provided.

Keywords
design-based science learning; problem-solving; middle school; assessment
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151715 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2018-10-10Bibliographically approved
Due, K., Tellgren, B., Areljung, S., Ottander, C. & Sundberg, B. (2018). Inte som i skolan - pedagoger positionerar naturvetenskap i förskolan: Preschool teachers talk about science – Positioning themselves and positioning science. NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, 14(4), 411-426
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inte som i skolan - pedagoger positionerar naturvetenskap i förskolan: Preschool teachers talk about science – Positioning themselves and positioning science
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2018 (Swedish)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 411-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses how preschool teachers, who include a scientific content in their practice, describe their practice and their view of science in preschool. The study is based on 20 interviews in 9 Swedish preschools. The theoretical and analytical framework combine "communities of practice"(Lave & Wenger) and "positioning theory" (Harré & Langehove). The stories reveal a strong position for the pre-school curriculum and traditions. A prominent storyline is that Science in preschool is something different from science in school. This includes an anti-authoritarian view with a focus on "the competent child". The preschool teachers affirm fantasy, creativity and intuition as a part of science and they position science as easy to access. They also position themselves as pedagogues competent to manage science in preschool. One of the dilemmas is about letting children’s interests and initiatives drive the activities while educators curriculum- based goals have certain intentions to fulfill.

National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153348 (URN)10.5617/nordina.4106 (DOI)
Projects
Science in Preschool
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, B., Areljung, S., Due, K., Ekström, K., Ottander, C. & Tellgren, B. (2018). Opportunities for and obstacles to science in preschools: views from a community perspective. International Journal of Science Education, 40(17), 2061-2077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities for and obstacles to science in preschools: views from a community perspective
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, no 17, p. 2061-2077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, Activity Theory (AT) is used to analyse general patterns for how cultural and historical factors interact with the shaping of science activities in preschools. Data was produced from field notes, video observations, video stimulated recall group discussions and individual interviews with preschool teachers at fourteen preschool units, where science activities were described as a common feature of the practice. Two factors were found to be particularly important for how and whether science learning opportunities were afforded the children: the structure of the preschool community and the type of educational culture within it. In communities characterised by weak mutual commitment and without joint understanding of the purpose of the activities, the science learning objects of the activity often became fragmented and thereby elusive. This was also true for strong communities, with a shared approach and a joint understanding of the purpose of the science activities, but with educational cultures where science learning was not actively supported. In contrast, a strong community combined with an educational culture that allowed teachers to lead and intentionally frame the science content, offered child-centred science activities with clear science learning objects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
early years/early childhood, qualitative research, teacher beliefs, activity theory
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
didactics of natural science; educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151747 (URN)10.1080/09500693.2018.1518615 (DOI)000451897000001 ()2-s2.0-85053318259 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2011-5657
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Vaino, K., Vaino, T. & Ottander, C. (2017). An attempt to combine science learning with engineering in a middle school science classroom. In: : . Paper presented at ESERA 2017 Conference, Dublin City University, Ireland, 21st - 25th Aug, 2017. European Science Education Research Association.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An attempt to combine science learning with engineering in a middle school science classroom
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the current study, middle school students’ problem-solving was explored. Within a design-based science learning (DBSL) module, the students were expected to design an ice cream making device. The goals of the study were: (a) to describe the DBSL module; (b) to develop an understanding of the processes of student design and difficulties they face within the given setting; (c) to find out how science knowledge was used by students in a design situation; (d) to explore how student design processes and design products can be characterised and eventually, assessed.  Data were gathered by students’ written reports and video recorded classroom observations. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the crucial areas important for design success were the students’ understanding of the scientific phenomena and the operational principles behind the ice cream making device. Lack of one or both led to unrealistic design ideas. As a result of the study, a set of assessment criteria was developed which covered the functional, structural, safety and feasibility aspects of the device. According to the criteria, it was found that amongst the initial individual design projects (N=23), only eight could be classified as realistic, nine as realistic with reservations while seven were classified as unrealistic. The initial difficulties, were overcome though, by peer support, teacher guidance, and some trial and error experiences resulting in five mostly realistic group designs.

National Category
Didactics
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138746 (URN)
Conference
ESERA 2017 Conference, Dublin City University, Ireland, 21st - 25th Aug, 2017. European Science Education Research Association
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Vaino, K., Vaino, T. & Ottander, C. (2017). Designing an ice cream making device: An attempt to combine science learning with engineering.. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Research Symposium on Science Education (NFSUN) 2017: Science competencies for the future. Trondheim, 7-9 June, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing an ice cream making device: An attempt to combine science learning with engineering.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the current study, lower secondary school students’ problem-solving was explored while using a design-based science learning (DBSL) approach. A learning module in which students were expected to design an ice cream making device was developed. The goal of the study was to introduce the DBSL module and to explore how student design products can be characterised and eventually, assessed. Data were gathered by students’ written reports and video recorded classroom observations. As a result of the study, a set of assessment criteria was developed which covered the functional, structural, safety and feasibility aspects of the device. According to the criteria, it was found that amongst the initial individual design projects (N=23), only eight could be classified as realistic, nine as realistic with reservations while seven were classified as unrealistic. The initial difficulties, though, were overcome by peer support, teacher guidance, and some trial and error experiences resulting in five mostly realistic group designs.

National Category
Didactics
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138748 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Research Symposium on Science Education (NFSUN) 2017: Science competencies for the future. Trondheim, 7-9 June, 2017.
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Areljung, S., Ottander, C. & Due, K. (2017). "Drawing the leaves anyway": teachers embracing children's different ways of knowing in preschool science practice. Research in science education, 47(6), 1173-1192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Drawing the leaves anyway": teachers embracing children's different ways of knowing in preschool science practice
2017 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1173-1192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores if and how teachers combine practices of science and of preschool (children 1–5 years old) into preschool science practice. Views of knowing may differ between science practices, traditionally associated with masculinity and rationality, and preschool practices, traditionally associated with femininity and caring. Recognising this, wehave chosen to focus on how teachers’ talk constructs and relates to possible ways of gaining knowledge and reaching explanations of phenomena in preschool science. The analysis buildson two concept pairs often associated with gender as well as knowing: objective-subjective and logical-intuitive. The analysed material consists of 11 group interviews where preschool teachers talk about activities concerning science content. Our results show that several ways of knowing are possible in work with science content in preschool. These include ways of knowing more associated with subjectivity, such as ‘individual liking’ and ‘whole-body perception’, as well as more associated with objectivity, such as ‘noticing differences and similarities’. Furthermore, the results show that the teachers’ talk moves readily between possibilities associated with femininity (subjective and intuitive) and masculinity (objective and logical). This indicates that the teachers in this study have found ways to handle science in preschool that goes against presumed tensions between science and preschool practices. The results contribute to more nuanced ways of describing and thinking about science in preschool and pave the way for further development of science education in early childhood education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Early childhood education, Science education, Preschool teachers, Gendered practices
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127418 (URN)10.1007/s11165-016-9557-3 (DOI)000416157800001 ()
Projects
Förskolans praktik i mötet med naturvetenskap
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721 2011 5657
Available from: 2016-11-10 Created: 2016-11-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Manni, A., Sporre, K. & Ottander, C. (2017). Emotions and values: a case study of meaning-making in ESE. Environmental Education Research, 23(4), 451-464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotions and values: a case study of meaning-making in ESE
2017 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 451-464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With an interest in the role of emotions and values in students' meaning-making in Environmental and Sustainability Education a case study was carried out in a Swedish school-class with students, 12 years of age. During a six-week thematic group-work focusing environmental and sustainability issues related to food, the students were observed and interviewed in their daily school practice. The results are presented here through narrative reporting, and analysed with the use of Dewey's theoretical perspectives on experience, distinguishing three phases in a process: a start, an activity phase and a closure. Martha Nussbaum's theory of emotions is used to assist in the understanding of emotions and values. The study reports on active and independent meaning-making processes in students' group work. The results provide examples of students' meaning-making experiences and the role of emotions and values in them, indicating that more of values are formed and expressed in the concluding phase.

Keywords
meaning-making, emotions, values, environmental and sustainability issues, meningsskapande, emotioner, värden, miljö- och hållbarhetsfrågor
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120384 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2016.1175549 (DOI)000395203700001 ()
Available from: 2016-05-16 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Levinson, R. & The PARRISE Consortium, . (2017). Socio-scientific inquiry-based learning: taking off from STEPWISE. In: Larry Bencze (Ed.), Science and technology education promoting wellbeing for individuals, societies and environments: (pp. 477-502). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-scientific inquiry-based learning: taking off from STEPWISE
2017 (English)In: Science and technology education promoting wellbeing for individuals, societies and environments / [ed] Larry Bencze, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 477-502Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the European Union, educational policy-making bodies are encouraging projects of inquiry-based learning to stimulate interest of young people in science and broaden the science and technological skills base. In this chapter, I discuss how a project that incorporates socio-political questions as the object of its inquiry can critically address issues of consumerism and unequal distribution that affect contemporary neoliberal economies. Components of this model of inquiry draw on substantive scientific knowledge incorporating Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), Critical Citizenship Education, Socio-Scientific Issues, as well as Inquiry; hence, the acronym, SSIBL (Socio-Scientific Inquiry Based Learning). Social values at the heart of this project are science inquiry as for and with people, recognising that we live in a diverse world where technological change should be underpinned by social justice and political responsibility. We describe how authentic activities, those that stem from students' concerns, can be derived from these values to lead to non-trivial action which takes into account social, political and cultural constraints and uncertainties. Inquiries reflect issues that have personal, social and global relevance. A sensitive assessment strategy is developed, which incorporates knowledge about the issue, skills of organising, values that reflect the underlying principles of compassionate justice and dispositions of inclusivity and criticality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2017
Series
Cultural Studies of Science Education (CSSE) ; 14
Keywords
Inquiry, Responsible Research & Innovation, Socio-scientific issues, Social justice, Action, Authenticity
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156806 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-55505-8_22 (DOI)978-3-319-55503-4 (ISBN)978-3-319-55505-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-27 Created: 2019-02-27 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Ottander, C. & Ottander, K. (2017). Teachers’ design of socio-scientific inquiry based teaching and learning sessions. In: : . Paper presented at ESERA 2017 Conference, Dublin City University, Ireland, 21-25 August, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ design of socio-scientific inquiry based teaching and learning sessions
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

An important goal for science education is to develop the knowledge students need as citizens as well as knowledge for future studies in science and technology. This knowledge can be developed through inquiry-based science education (IBSE) and the teaching of socio-scientific issues (SSI). However, such pedagogy has proved to be challenging for many teachers, as it involves changes in their beliefs and values as well as the adoption of new practices.  In a development and coordination EU FP7 project, PARRISE, three approaches to science education are drawn together: SSI, IBSE, Citizenship Education (CE) within the umbrella of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into Socio-Scientific Inquiry Based Learning (SSIBL). This study explores how experienced science education teachers, participating in a two-step teacher professional program based on SSIBL, express commitments and conceptualization of the goals in SSIBL. It also investigates the teachers’ design capacity of SSIBL teaching materials for upper secondary Science Studies. The empirical data consist of the communication and the designed learning materials within a learning management system. Both the developed teaching materials and the design process are analysed. Results show that all teachers developed design agency for SSIBL teaching; for example, most of the activities encouraged the students to pose questions and develop a “need-to-know” among the students. Moreover, the teaching materials gave the students an opportunity to uncover the dilemmas and controversies, and critically explore the reasons for different viewpoints and gave good opportunities for students to develop action competence.

National Category
Didactics Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138745 (URN)
Conference
ESERA 2017 Conference, Dublin City University, Ireland, 21-25 August, 2017
Projects
PARRISE
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 612438
Available from: 2017-08-30 Created: 2017-08-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ottander, K. & Ottander, C. (2017). To organize an effective TPD culture: workshop for headmasters, education managers and policy makers. In: : . Paper presented at Science and society in education. Promoting Responsible Research and innovation through Science Education. Teacher conference, Dublin, 20 Aug, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To organize an effective TPD culture: workshop for headmasters, education managers and policy makers
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Previous research on teachers’ responses to changes in the curriculum or to new innovations has shown that they do not easily make changes in practice. For teachers to commit to new goals and strategies it is important that the TPD satisfy three basic needs: for competence, relatedness, and autonomy. For headmasters and education managers it is important to organize a TPD that is cost efficient. This workshop will present a model for TPD that mix online material with face to face discussions where teachers discuss, co-plan and collectively reflect upon experiences from the changed practice. The model focuses on the processes by which teachers advance their skills (competence), make their plans relevant to their contexts (relatedness) and exercise ownership (autonomy) in the process of change. Hence, it is an effective professional development model designed to address teachers view of student learning goals and needs. The model can be implemented without too much interference in the teachers’ time schedules for teaching.

National Category
Didactics
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138747 (URN)
Conference
Science and society in education. Promoting Responsible Research and innovation through Science Education. Teacher conference, Dublin, 20 Aug, 2017
Projects
PARRISE
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 612438
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5269-1451

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