umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Hermansson, C., Jonsson, B., Levlin, M., Lindhé, A., Lundgren, B. & Norlund Shaswar, A. (2019). The (non)effect of Joint Construction in a genre-based approach to teaching writing. The Journal of educational research (Washington, D.C.)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The (non)effect of Joint Construction in a genre-based approach to teaching writing
Show others...
2019 (English)In: The Journal of educational research (Washington, D.C.), ISSN 0022-0671, E-ISSN 1940-0675Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This quasi-experimental intervention study examines the effect of genre-based instructional practices on 90 primary students’ narrative writing achievements and is a result of six teachers’ action to meet the educational goals of the Swedish national curriculum. Specifically, the authors examine the effects of Joint Construction, the phase in the genre pedagogical model of the Sydney School known as the Teaching and Learning Cycle, in which teachers and students work together to co-construct texts. Joint Construction has been put forward as the most powerful part of the Teaching and Learning Cycle. The authors challenge this argument, presenting findings that are inconsistent with this widely held belief. Using a pretest-posttest control group design, the study shows that the Joint Construction stage did not significantly improve the quality of students’ narrative writing or increase the text length of their writings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Genre-based approach, joint construction, narrative text, primary school, writing
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156988 (URN)10.1080/00220671.2018.1563038 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-15
Korhonen, J., Nyroos, M., Jonsson, B. & Eklöf, H. (2018). Additive and multiplicative effects of working memory and test anxiety on mathematics performance in grade 3 students. Educational Psychology, 38(5), 572-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Additive and multiplicative effects of working memory and test anxiety on mathematics performance in grade 3 students
2018 (English)In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 572-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the interplay between test anxiety and working memory (WM) on mathematics performance in younger children. A sample of 624 grade 3 students completed a test battery consisting of a test anxiety scale, WM tasks and the Swedish national examination in mathematics for grade 3. The main effects of test anxiety and WM, and the two-way interaction between test anxiety and WM on mathematics performance, were modelled with structural equation modelling techniques. Additionally, the effects were also tested separately on tasks with high WM demands (mathematical problem-solving) versus low WM demands (basic arithmetic). As expected, WM positively predicted mathematics performance in all three models (overall mathematics performance, problem-solving tasks, and basic arithmetic). Test anxiety had a negative effect on problem-solving on the whole sample level but concerning basic arithmetic only students with lower WM were affected by the negative effects of test anxiety on performance. Thus, students with low WM are more vulnerable to the negative effects of test anxiety in low WM tasks like basic arithmetic. The results are discussed in relation to the early identification of test anxiety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Latent interaction, mathematics, test anxiety, working memory
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138003 (URN)10.1080/01443410.2017.1356449 (DOI)000432155600003 ()2-s2.0-85026392897 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Kognitiva implikationer för matematiklärande hos yngre barn
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2331
Available from: 2017-08-01 Created: 2017-08-01 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. B. T., Kjellberg, E., Heimdahl, U. & Jonsson, B. (2018). Shame and interpersonal sensitivity: Gender differences and the association between internalized shame coping strategies and interpersonal sensitivity. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 82(2), 137-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shame and interpersonal sensitivity: Gender differences and the association between internalized shame coping strategies and interpersonal sensitivity
2018 (English)In: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, ISSN 0025-9284, E-ISSN 1943-2828, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 137-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated gender differences in interpersonal sensitivity and internalized shame coping strategies in 252 undergraduate students. To measure interpersonal sensitivity and shame coping strategies, the self-assessment forms Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure and Compass of Shame Scale were used. The analyses revealed that compared to men, women display interpersonal sensitivity to a higher degree, and they use internalized shame coping strategies to a greater extent. The results also showed that interpersonal sensitivity is highly correlated with shame coping strategies. However, in contrast to earlier research, no gender difference was found, and gender did not significantly mediate the association between interpersonal sensitivity and internalized shame coping. These results could aid clinicians and researchers in promoting, designing, delivering, and evaluating treatments for patients with, for example, depression, anxiety, and interpersonal and/or relational problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Guilford Publications, 2018
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148757 (URN)10.1521/bumc.2018.82.2.137 (DOI)000432962200003 ()29791193 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Röhlcke, S., Bäcklund, C., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Jonsson, B. (2018). Time on task matters most in video game expertise. PLoS ONE, 13(10), Article ID e0206555.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time on task matters most in video game expertise
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e0206555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we investigated whether working memory capacity (WMC), personality characteristics (grit) and number of matches played (time on task) can predict performance score (matchmaking rating [MMR]) in experienced players of a popular video game called Dota 2. A questionnaire and four online-based cognitive tasks were used to gather the data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to investigate the interrelationships between constructs. The results showed that time on task was the strongest predictor of MMR, and grit also significantly influenced performance. However, WMC did not play a substantial role in predicting performance while playing Dota 2. These results are discussed in relation to sample characteristics and the role of deliberate practice and skill acquisition within the domain of playing Dota 2. Further, we suggest that future research investigates the social aspects of attaining skill, the relationship between personality and performance, and the qualitative aspects of time spent on a task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152930 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0206555 (DOI)000448641200043 ()30372473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055612705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, T. & Jonsson, B. (2017). Assessing the Willingness to Elaborate among Young Students: Psychometric Evaluation of a Swedish Need for Cognition Scale. Frontiers in Education, 2, Article ID 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the Willingness to Elaborate among Young Students: Psychometric Evaluation of a Swedish Need for Cognition Scale
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 2, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The personality trait Need for Cognition (NFC) has been studied for many years, and found to be important for individuals’ educational achievement. The original NFC-scale was developed in the eighties, and during the following decade the scale was translated and adapted into a number of other languages. A renewed interest for the personality trait of NFC has made these scales interesting to use. It is though vital that instruments used for studies of individual differences in the area of educational research, or in any other area, can portray valid results today. The aim of the present paper was to evaluate validity and reliability of the short version of the Mental Effort Tolerance Questionnaire, a Swedish adaption of the NFC-scale made in 1991, which has not been previously evaluated. This study involved 420 young students, and the evaluation of reliability includes a study of temporal stability (test-retest), as well as internal stability. Further, the evaluation of validity includes construct and criterion validity. Regarding reliability, the results showed a test-retest reliability coefficient of .88 (n = 108), and an internal stability (Cronbach’s alpha) of .88 (n = 420). Evaluation of construct validity found evidence for a five factor dimensional structure (n = 420), discriminant validity to measures of general intelligence (r = .25; n = 122), working memory (r = .22; n =164), and the personality trait Grit (r = .26; n = 169). Finally, criterion validity was found for grades (r =.35; n =125). Overall, the results of the evaluation show that the inferences made from the results of the short version of the Swedish NFC-scale exhibits satisfactory reliability and validity, suggesting that the questionnaire can be used in educational contexts. The questionnaire might, however, benefit from being even more shortened.

Keywords
Personality, need for cognition, grit, Validity and Reliability, Educational achievment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131751 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2017.00002 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-02-20 Created: 2017-02-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, T., Jönsson, F. & Jonsson, B. (2017). Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics. Educational Psychology, 37(2), 145-156
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group discussions and test-enhanced learning: individual learning outcomes and personality characteristics
2017 (English)In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 145-156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions benefit learning when compared to test-enhanced learning over time. The results showed that feedback does not seem to have any effect if provided to a discussion group,and that test-enhanced learning leads to better learning than the discussion groups, independent of retention interval. Moreover, we examined whether memory and learning might be influenced by the participants’ need for cognition (NFC). The results showed that those scoring high on NFC remembered more than those who scored low. To conclude, testing trumps discussion groups from a learning perspective, and the discussion groups were also the least beneficial learning context for those scoring low on NFC.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117603 (URN)10.1080/01443410.2016.1143087 (DOI)000395093000005 ()
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Andersson, M., Jonsson, B. & Nyberg, L. (2017). Neural activations associated with feedback and retrieval success. npj Science of Learning, 2(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural activations associated with feedback and retrieval success
2017 (English)In: npj Science of Learning, E-ISSN 2056-7936, Vol. 2, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is substantial behavioral evidence for a phenomenon commonly called “the testing effect”, i.e. superior memory performance after repeated testing compared to re-study of to-be-learned materials. However, considerably less is known about the underlying neuro-cognitive processes that are involved in the initial testing phase and thus underlies the actual testing effect. Here, we investigated functional brain activity related to test-enhanced learning with feedback. Subjects learned foreign vocabulary across three consecutive tests with correct-answer feedback. Functional brain-activity responses were analyzed in relation to retrieval and feedback events, respectively. Results revealed up-regulated activity in fronto-striatal regions during the first successful retrieval, followed by a marked reduction in activity as a function of improved learning. Whereas feedback improved behavioral performance across consecutive tests, feedback had a negligable role after the first successful retrieval for functional brain-activity modulations. It is suggested that the beneficial effects of test-enhanced learning is regulated by feedback-induced updating of memory representations, mediated via the striatum, that might underlie the stabilization of memory commonly seen in behavioral studies of the testing effect.

Keywords
test-enhanced learning, feedback, retrieval success, learning
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142064 (URN)10.1038/s41539-017-0013-6 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2014-2099
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordvall, O., Jonsson, B. & Stigsdotter Neely, A. (2017). Self-reported and performance-based measures of executive functions in interned youth. Psychology, Crime and Law, 23(3), 240-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported and performance-based measures of executive functions in interned youth
2017 (English)In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 240-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study address three questions: (a) Do interned adolescents exhibit general or specific deficits in the core executive functions, as compared to an age-matched control group? (b) Do interned adolescents report more executive problems in everyday life, as compared to an age-matched control group? And (c) are performance-based measures of executive functions related to self-reported executive problems? Thirty-one interned youths and 40 non-interned controls participated in the study. To this end, we measured the three constituents (inhibition, shifting, and updating) of the Unity/Diversity model of executive functioning, as well as the participants’ self-reported everyday executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functions scale. The interned group performed less well compared to the control group on the majority of performance-based tasks but did not show more pronounced deficits in any one executive function, reflective of a more general deficit. Compared to the controls, the interned adolescents also reported more dysfunction in executive behaviors related to the ability to inhibit action, behavioral flexibility, working memory, and the ability to follow through with tasks. Overall, correlations between self-report and performance-based measures were weak. These findings suggest that performance-based and self-report measures may assess different, albeit important, aspects of executive functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
adolescence, Antisocial behavior, executive functions, performance-based measures, ratings of behavior
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128353 (URN)10.1080/1068316X.2016.1239725 (DOI)000395410000003 ()
Funder
The Swedish National Board of Institutional Care, SiS, 1.2009/0018.5-1
Available from: 2016-12-02 Created: 2016-12-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordvall, O., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Jonsson, B. (2017). Self-Reported Impulsivity and its Relation to Executive Functions in Interned Youth. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 24(6), 910-922
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Reported Impulsivity and its Relation to Executive Functions in Interned Youth
2017 (English)In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 910-922Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In adolescence, antisocial behaviors increase in prevalence, an occurrence that has been related to the parallel increase of impulsive behaviors. However, impulsivity is a conglomerate of unidimensional impulsigenic traits, divided into aspects of behavioral dyscontrol and sensation seeking. In the present study, we examine how these traits differ between interned youth and an aged-matched control group, and how they relate to executive functioning. Results indicate that impulsigenic traits related to behavioral dyscontrol, but not sensation seeking, are more pronounced in interned adolescents. Also, executive functioning was predictive of lack of premeditation, a trait specifically related to antisocial behavior. One implication of this is that interventions improving executive functioning could be beneficial in the rehabilitation of interned adolescents with impulsivity-related problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
adolescence, antisocial behavior, executive function, impulsivity, interned youth, self assessment, UPPS.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142547 (URN)10.1080/13218719.2017.1327312 (DOI)000423286000010 ()
Available from: 2017-12-03 Created: 2017-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, B., Waling, M., Olafsdottir, A. S., Lagström, H., Wergedahl, H., Olsson, C., . . . Hörnell, A. (2017). The effect of schooling on basic cognition in selected Nordic Countries. Europe's Journal of Psychology, 13(4), 645-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of schooling on basic cognition in selected Nordic Countries
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Europe's Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1841-0413, E-ISSN 1841-0413, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 645-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated schooling effects on cognition. Cognitive data were collected as part of a research project (ProMeal) that investigated school meals and measured the intake of school lunch in relation to children’s health, cognitive function, and classroom learning in four Nordic countries, among children between 10–11 years of age. It was found that Finnish pupils attending 4th grade were not, on any measure, outperformed by Norwegian and Icelandic pupils attending 5th and Swedish pupils attending 4th grade on a task measuring working memory capacity, processing speed, inhibition, and in a subsample on response- and attention control. Moreover, boys were found to perform superior to girls on tasks measuring processing speed. However, girls were found to perform better on tasks related to attention and self-control. The results are discussed in relation to the reciprocal association between cognition and schooling and whether these results reflect quality differences between schools in the four Nordic countries; most notably in comparison to Finland.

Keywords
schooling effects, cognitive functioning, working memory, processing speed, attention, response control, inhibition
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Learning Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Psychology; Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142549 (URN)10.5964/ejop.v13i4.1339 (DOI)
Projects
ProMeal (Prospects for promoting health and performance by school meals in Nordic countries)
Funder
Nordic Council of Ministers, 54761
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5884-6469

Search in DiVA

Show all publications