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Bergdahl, Jan
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Mårell, L., Bergdahl, J., Tillberg, A., Stenberg, B. & Berglund, A. (2019). Psychological symptoms and self-image of patients with complaints attributed to dental restorative materials. Clinical Oral Investigations, 23(6), 2805-2811
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological symptoms and self-image of patients with complaints attributed to dental restorative materials
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 2805-2811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim was to study self-image and the level of psychological symptoms in patients with symptoms attributed to their dental restorative materials.

Materials and methods: A questionnaire containing questions regarding dental and medical history was answered by 257 participants, one group with local oral symptoms only (LSO), and one group with multi-symptoms (M-S). A reference group was randomly selected from a research database at the Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden. The self-image was assessed using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Psychological symptoms such as somatization, depression, and anxiety were assessed using the Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90) and the Global Severity Index (GSI) was used to determine the level of psychological symptoms.

Results: SASB showed that the M-S group and the LSO-group scored significantly higher on the Bspontaneous^ and Bpositive self-image^ than the reference group. In the SCL-90, the M-S group scored significantly higher than the LSO-group and the references on the somatization subscales. On depression, anxiety, and the GSI scale, the M-S group scored significantly higher than the reference group.

Conclusions: The two subgroups scored significantly higher on the SASB Spontaneous and Positive clusters which indicates that these patients have an excessively positive self-image, are very spontaneous and have an overconfidence in themselves compared to the reference group. In the M-S group there was a clear tendency to somatization, depression, and anxiety and they were more psychologically stressed than the reference group.

Clinical relevance: Among the patients with illness attributed to their dental materials, the M-S-patients had a significantly higher level of general psychological distress and somatization than the control group which may lead to mental stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2019
Keywords
Dental materials, Environmental intolerance, SASB, SCL-90
National Category
Biomaterials Science Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114092 (URN)10.1007/s00784-018-2707-4 (DOI)000467444800026 ()30368660 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form with titel "Psychological symptoms and self-image of patients with complaints attributed to dental restorative materials: Psychological symptoms in patients with environmental intolerance".

Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Stein, L., Bergdahl, M., Pettersen, K. S. & Bergdahl, J. (2018). Effects of the Conceptual Model of Health Literacy as a Risk: A Randomised Controlled Trial in a Clinical Dental Context. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(8), Article ID 1630.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of the Conceptual Model of Health Literacy as a Risk: A Randomised Controlled Trial in a Clinical Dental Context
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 8, article id 1630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Numerous conceptual models of health literacy have been proposed in the literature, but very few have been empirically validated in clinical contexts. The aim of this study was to test the effects of the conceptual model of health literacy as a risk in a clinical dental context. A convenience sample of 133 Norwegian-speaking adults was recruited. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 64, 54% women, mean age = 50 years) and a control group (n = 69, 49% women, mean age = 46 years). Clinical measurements were conducted pre-intervention and six months post-intervention. In the intervention group, communication regarding patients' oral health was tailored to their health literacy levels using recommended communication techniques, whereas the control group received brief information not tailored to health literacy levels. The ANCOVA showed significant between-group effects, finding reduced post-intervention mean gingival (p < 0.000) and mean plaque (p < 0.000) indices in the intervention group when controlling for baseline index scores. The adjusted Cohen's d indicated large effect sizes between the intervention group and the control group for both the mean gingival index (-0.98) and the mean plaque index (-1.33). In conclusion, the conceptual model of health literacy as a risk had a large effect on important clinical outcomes, such as gingival status and oral hygiene. The model may be regarded as a suitable supplement to patient education in populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
health literacy, patient education, dentistry, oral health, RCT
National Category
Dentistry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152229 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15081630 (DOI)000443168200070 ()30071702 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-25 Created: 2018-10-25 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, L., Bergdahl, J. & Nyberg, L. (2016). Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress. Cerebral Cortex, 26(8), 3527-3533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Evidence for Smaller Hippocampus Volume as a Vulnerability Factor for Perceived Stress
2016 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 3527-3533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hippocampal volume has been found to be smaller in individuals with stress-related disorders, but it remains unclear whether smaller volume is a consequence of stress or rather a vulnerability factor. Here, we examined this issue by relating stress levels to hippocampal volumes in healthy participants examined every 5 years in a longitudinal population-based study. Based on scores of 25- to 60-year-old participants on the perceived stress questionnaire, we defined moderately to high (n = 35) and low (n = 76) stress groups. The groups were re-examined after 5 years (at the 6th study wave). Historical data on subjective stress were available up to 10 years prior to Wave 5. At the first MRI session, the moderately to high stress group had a significantly smaller hippocampal volume, as measured by FreeSurfer (version 5.3), compared with the low-stress group. At follow-up, group differences in stress levels and hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In retrospective analyses of subjective stress, the observed group difference in stress was found to be stable. The long-term stability of group differences in perceived stress and hippocampal volume suggests that a small hippocampal volume may be a vulnerability factor for stress-related disorders.

Keywords
healthy individuals, hippocampal volume, magnetic resonance imaging, stress, susceptibility
National Category
Nursing Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124464 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhw154 (DOI)000383198900016 ()27230217 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Vestergren, P., Stenling, A., Nilsson, L.-G., Bergdahl, M. & Bergdahl, J. (2015). Dimensionality of stress experiences: Factorial structure of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) in a population-based Swedish sample. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(5), 592-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensionality of stress experiences: Factorial structure of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) in a population-based Swedish sample
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 592-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated the factorial structure of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-recent; Levenstein, Prantera, Varvo et al., 1993) in a large (N = 1516; 35-95 years) population-based Swedish sample (Nilsson, Adolfsson, Backman et al., 2004; Nilsson, Backman, Erngrund et al., 1997). Exploratory principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted on a first, randomly drawn subsample (n = 506). Next, the model based on the PCA was tested in a second sample (n = 505). Finally, a third sample (n = 505) was used to cross-validate the model. Five components were extracted in the PCA (eigenvalue > 1) and labeled "Demands," "Worries/Tension," " Lack of joy," " Conflict," and " Fatigue," respectively. Twenty-one out of the 30 original PSQ items were retained in a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model that included the five (first-order) factors and, additionally, a general (second-order) stress factor, not considered in prior models. The model showed reasonable goodness of fit [chi(2)(184) = 511.2, p < 0.001; CFI = 0.904; RMSEA = 0.059; and SRMR = 0.063]. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported the validity of the established model. The results are discussed in relation to prior investigations of the factorial structure of the PSQ.

Keywords
Perceived stress, confirmatory factor analysis, multigroup analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112282 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12214 (DOI)000364596100016 ()26096909 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stein, L., Bergdahl, M., Pettersen, K. S. & Bergdahl, J. (2015). Exploring the association between oral health literacy and alexithymia. Community Dental Health, 32(3), 143-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the association between oral health literacy and alexithymia
2015 (English)In: Community Dental Health, ISSN 0265-539X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 143-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low health literacy and alexithymia have separately been emphasized as barriers to patient-practitioner communication, but the association between the two concepts has not been explored. Objective: To test the hypothesis that low oral health literacy and alexithymia are associated. Method: Adults (n=127) aged 21-80 years (56% women) participated in this cross-sectional study. Oral health literacy was assessed using the interview-based Adult Health Literacy Instrument for Dentistry (AHLID) with scores from 1-5. The self-administered Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was used to assess three distinct TAS-20 factors and TAS-20 total score. Results: Significant negative correlations between AHLID scores and TAS-20 factors 2, 3 and TAS-20 total score were found. Regression analyses showed that TAS-20 factor 3, externally-oriented thinking (beta=-0.21, SE=0.02, p=0.017), and TAS-20 total score (beta=-0.18, SE=0.01, p=0.036) were significant predictors of AHLID level. Conclusion: The hypothesis that low oral health literacy is associated with alexithymia was supported. This finding proposes that alexithymia may be considered as a possible factor for low oral health literacy. However, the correlations are not strong, and the results should be regarded as a first step to provide evidence with additional research on this topic being needed.

Keywords
alexithymia, health literacy, oral health literacy, patient-practitioner communication, personality, rway
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114038 (URN)10.1922/CDH_3637Stein05 (DOI)000366754600004 ()26513848 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D., Bergdahl, J., Bergdahl, M., Nyberg, L., Adolfsson, R. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2014). Dental status is unrelated to risk of dementia: a 20-year prospective study [Letter to the editor]. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 62(5), 979-981
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental status is unrelated to risk of dementia: a 20-year prospective study
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2014 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 979-981Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90863 (URN)10.1111/jgs.12814 (DOI)000336385300036 ()24828929 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-07-15 Created: 2014-07-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mårell, L., Tillberg, A., Widman, L., Bergdahl, J. & Berglund, A. (2014). Regression of oral lichenoid lesions after replacement of dental restorations. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 41(5), 381-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regression of oral lichenoid lesions after replacement of dental restorations
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 381-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to determine the prognosis and to evaluate the regression of lichenoid contact reactions (LCR) and oral lichen planus (OLP) after replacement of dental restorative materials suspected as causing the lesions. Forty-four referred patients with oral lesions participated in a follow-up study that was initiated an average of 6years after the first examination at the Department of Odontology, i.e. the baseline examination. The patients underwent odontological clinical examination and answered a questionnaire with questions regarding dental health, medical and psychological health, and treatments undertaken from baseline to follow-up. After exchange of dental materials, regression of oral lesions was significantly higher among patients with LCR than with OLP. As no cases with OLP regressed after an exchange of materials, a proper diagnosis has to be made to avoid unnecessary exchanges of intact restorations on patients with OLP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
oral lichen; oral lichen planus; oral lichenoid contact reactions; exchange of dental materials
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88663 (URN)10.1111/joor.12151 (DOI)000334050900008 ()
Available from: 2014-05-19 Created: 2014-05-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mousavi, M., Jonsson, P., Antti, H., Adolfsson, R., Nordin, A., Bergdahl, J., . . . Nyberg, L. (2014). Serum metabolomic biomarkers of dementia. Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, 4(2), 252-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum metabolomic biomarkers of dementia
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2014 (English)In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 252-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study compared serum metabolites of demented patients (Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia) and controls, and explored serum metabolite profiles of nondemented individuals 5 years preceding the diagnosis. Methods: Cognitively healthy participants were followed up for 5-20 years. Cognitive assessment, serum sampling, and diagnosis were completed every 5 years. Multivariate analyses were conducted on the metabolite profiles generated by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Results: A significant group separation was found between demented patients and controls, and between incident cases and controls. Metabolites that contributed in both analyses were 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and uric acid. Conclusions: Serum metabolite profiles are altered in demented patients, and detectable up to 5 years preceding the diagnosis. Blood sampling can make an important contribution to the early prediction of conversion to dementia.

Keywords
Memory, Early diagnosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Vascular dementia, Gas chromatography
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92543 (URN)10.1159/000364816 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson, B., Bergdahl, J., Eriksson, N. & Stenberg, B. (2013). Coping and Self-image in Patients With Symptoms Attributed to Indoor Environment. Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health, 68(3), 145-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping and Self-image in Patients With Symptoms Attributed to Indoor Environment
2013 (English)In: Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health, ISSN 1933-8244, E-ISSN 2154-4700, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 145-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated self-image and coping ability in a group of patients with symptoms from indoor environment. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to 239 patients previously referred with nonspecific building-related symptoms at University Hospital in Umeå, Sweden. One hundred seventy-four women and 14 men answered and the patient group rated their self-image as more spontaneous, more positive, and less negative than a control group. The patient group rated higher on the cognitive scale in the Coping Resources Inventory (CRI) than the control group. The female patients had an increased risk of not being able to work associated with a low score on negative self-image. The authors conclude that certain personality traits may be potential risk factors that increase the probability of encountering and experiencing stressful work situations. The resulting stress may increase workers' susceptibility to indoor environment exposure.

Keywords
personality trait, sick building syndrome, stress, work capability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71039 (URN)10.1080/19338244.2012.676102 (DOI)000317300600003 ()23566321 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-05-16 Created: 2013-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, P., Sunnegårdh-Grönberg, K., Bergdahl, J., Bergdahl, M., Nyberg, L. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2013). Relationship between natural teeth and memory in a healthy elderly population. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 121(4), 333-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between natural teeth and memory in a healthy elderly population
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2013 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between mastication and cognitive function remains unclear, but both animal and experimental human studies suggest a possible causal relationship. In the present study it was hypothesized that natural teeth are of importance for hippocampus-based cognitive processes, such as episodic long-term memory. A population-based sample of 273 participants (55-80yr of age; 145 women) was investigated in a cross-sectional study. The participants underwent health assessment, completed a battery of cognitive tests, and took part in an extensive clinical oral examination. The number of natural teeth contributed uniquely and significantly to explaining variance (3-4%) in performance on measures of episodic memory and semantic memory over and above individual differences in age, years of education, gender, occupation, living conditions, and medical history. The number of natural teeth did not have an influence on the performance of measures of working memory, visuospatial ability, or processing speed. Within the limitations of the current study, a small, but significant, relationship between episodic memory and number of natural teeth is evident.

Keywords
cognition, hippocampus, human memory, oral health, tooth loss
National Category
Dentistry Geriatrics Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79234 (URN)10.1111/eos.12060 (DOI)000321577300006 ()
Available from: 2013-09-06 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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