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Bidleman, Terry F.
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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Bidleman, T. F., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Haglund, P., Kupryianchyk, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2019). Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 881-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517 (URN)10.1039/C9EM00042A (DOI)000468787800009 ()31032511 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F. & Melymuk, L. (2019). Forty-five years of foam: a retrospective on air sampling with polyurethane foam. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 102(4), 447-449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forty-five years of foam: a retrospective on air sampling with polyurethane foam
2019 (English)In: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, ISSN 0007-4861, E-ISSN 1432-0800, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 447-449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2019
Keywords
polurethane foam, active air sampling, passive air sampling
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Analytical Chemistry; environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157368 (URN)10.1007/s00128-019-02591-4 (DOI)000467708500001 ()30877318 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062957213 (Scopus ID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-03-16 Created: 2019-03-16 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F. & Tysklind, M. (2018). Breakthrough during air sampling with polyurethane foam: What do PUF 2/PUF 1 ratios mean?. Chemosphere, 192, 267-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breakthrough during air sampling with polyurethane foam: What do PUF 2/PUF 1 ratios mean?
2018 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 192, p. 267-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Frontal chromatography theory is applied to describe movement of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) through a column of polyurethane foam (PUF). Collected mass fractions (FC) are predicted for sample volume/breakthrough volume ratios (τ = VS/VB) up to 6.0 and PUF bed theoretical plate numbers (N) from 2 to 16. The predictions assume constant air concentrations and temperatures. Extension of the calculations is done to relate the collection efficiency of a 2-PUF train (FC1+2) to the PUF 2/PUF 1 ratio. FC1+2 exceeds 0.9 for PUF 2/PUF 1 ≤ 0.5 and lengths of PUF commonly used in air samplers. As the PUF 2/PUF 1 ratio approaches unity, confidence in these predictions is limited by the analytical ability to distinguish residues on the two PUFs. Field data should not be arbitrarily discarded because some analytes broke through to the backup PUF trap. The fractional collection efficiencies can be used to estimate air concentrations from quantities retained on the PUF trap when sampling is not quantitative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Air sampling, Semivolatile organic compounds, Polyurethane foam, Frontal chromatography, Collection efficiency
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141454 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.152 (DOI)000418313900030 ()29107878 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kupryianchyk, D., Giesler, R., Bidleman, T. F., Liljelind, P., Lau, D. C., Sponseller, R. A. & Andersson, P. L. (2018). Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 37(12), 3011-3017
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 3011-3017Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, novel flame retardants, and naturally occurring bromoanisoles in water and filter-feeding black fly (Simuliidae) larvae in 3 tundra streams in northern Sweden. The results demonstrate that black fly larvae accumulate a wide range of organic contaminants and can be used as bioindicators of water pollution in Arctic streams.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Emerging pollutants, Fate and transport, Bioaccumulation, Long-range transport, Arctic streams, Legacy contaminants
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153986 (URN)10.1002/etc.4267 (DOI)000451335300007 ()30183099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F., Brorström-Lundén, E., Hansson, K., Laudon, H., Nygren, O. & Tysklind, M. (2017). Atmospheric transport and deposition of bromoanisoles along a temperate to arctic gradient. Environmental Science and Technology, 51(19), 10974-10982
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atmospheric transport and deposition of bromoanisoles along a temperate to arctic gradient
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1086-931X, E-ISSN 1520-6912, Vol. 51, no 19, p. 10974-10982Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bromoanisoles (BAs) arise from O-methylation of bromophenols, produced by marine algae and invertebrates. BAs undergo sea-air exchange and are transported over the oceans. Here we report 2,4-DiBA and 2,4,6-TriBA in air and deposition on the Swedish west coast (Råö) and the interior of arctic Finland (Pallas). Results are discussed in perspective with previous measurements in the northern Baltic region in 2011−2013. BAs in air decreased from south to north in the order Råö > northern Baltic > Pallas. Geometric mean concentrations at Pallas increased significantly (p < 0.05) between 2002 and 2015 for 2,4-DiBA but not for 2,4,6-TriBA. The logarithm of BA partial pressures correlated significantly to reciprocal air temperature at the coastal station Råö and over the Baltic, but only weakly (2,4-DiBA) or not significantly (2,4,6-TriBA) at inland Pallas. Deposition fluxes of BAs were similar at both sites despite lower air concentrations at Pallas, due to greater precipitation scavenging at lower temperatures. Proportions of the two BAs in air and deposition were related to Henry’s law partitioning and source regions. Precipitation concentrations were 10−40% of those in surface water of Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. BAs deposited in the bay catchment likely enter rivers and provide an unexpected source to northern estuaries. BAs may be precursors to higher molecular weight compounds identified by others in Swedish inland lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: American Chemical Society (ACS), 2017
Keywords
polybrominated diphenyl ethers, persistent organic pollutants, bromoperoxidase catalyzed dimerization, halogenated natural products, dibenzo-P-dioxins, OH-PBDES, methoxylated derivatives, photochemical formation, brominated anisoles, marine environment
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140301 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.7b03218 (DOI)000412716500008 ()28885011 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F., Laudon, H., Nygren, O., Svanberg, S. & Tysklind, M. (2017). Chlorinated pesticides and natural brominated anisoles in air at three northern Baltic stations. Environmental Pollution, 225, 381-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlorinated pesticides and natural brominated anisoles in air at three northern Baltic stations
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 225, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive samplers were deployed at one inland and two island locations in the Bothnian Bay region of the northern Baltic Sea. Uptake was linear over 81–147 d and a temperature range of −2.6 to 14.2 °C for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) having log KOA ≥9 at ambient temperatures. Partial saturation of the PUF disks occurred for the more volatile OCPs hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and for bromoanisoles (BAs), which are products of bromophenols released by natural and anthropogenic sources. Correction for nonlinear uptake of these was made using experimentally measured PUF-air partition coefficients. Passive-derived air concentrations of pesticides were uniform over the bay and agreed within a factor of 2 or better with levels determined by active (pumped) sampling at one of the island stations. Levels of OCPs were similar to those reported at background sites in the European and Canadian Arctic and at monitoring stations in the central Baltic and southern Scandinavia, indicating long-range transport. The insecticide chlorpyrifos was 10 times lower at bay stations than in the Canadian Arctic. Insight to sources and processes was gained by examining compound profiles. Fractions Falpha = α-HCH/(α-HCH + γ-HCH) and FTC = trans-chlordane/(trans-chlordane + cis-chlordane) at bay stations were higher than in the Norwegian and Finnish Arctic and similar to those at the southern monitoring stations. Volatilization of chlordanes from Baltic seawater may also modify FTC. Higher FTriBA = 2,4,6-TriBA/(2,4,6-TriBA + 2,4-DiBA) distinguished local volatilization from the Baltic Sea versus lower FTriBA found at the inland site and reported in air on the Norwegian coast, suggesting westerly transport from the Atlantic across Norway and Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Passive air sampling, Polyurethane foam, Pesticides, Halogenated Natural Products, Baltic Sea
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134149 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2017.02.064 (DOI)000401679200041 ()28336095 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pućko, M., Stern, G. A., Burt, A. E., Jantunen, L. M., Bidleman, T. F., Macdonald, R. W., . . . Rysgaard, S. (2017). Current use pesticide and legacy organochlorine pesticide dynamics at the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interface in resolute passage, Canadian Arctic, during winter-summer transition. Science of the Total Environment, 580, 1460-1469
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current use pesticide and legacy organochlorine pesticide dynamics at the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interface in resolute passage, Canadian Arctic, during winter-summer transition
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2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 580, p. 1460-1469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we present the first detailed analysis of processes by which various current use pesticides (CUPs) and legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are concentrated in melt ponds that form on Arctic sea ice in the summer, when surface snow is melting and ice eventually breaks up. Four current use pesticides (dacthal, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, and pentachloronitrobenzene) and one legacy organochlorine pesticide (α-hexachlorocyclohexane) were detected in ponds in Resolute Passage, Canadian Arctic, in 2012. Melt-pond concentrations changed over time as a function of gas exchange, precipitation, and dilution with melting sea ice. Observed increases in melt-pond concentrations for all detected pesticides were associated with precipitation events. Dacthal reached the highest concentration of all current use pesticides in ponds (95 ± 71 pg L− 1), a value exceeding measured concentrations in the under-ice (0 m) and 5 m seawater by &gt; 10 and &gt; 16 times, respectively. Drainage of dacthal-enriched pond water to the ocean during ice break-up provides an important ice-mediated annual delivery route, adding ~ 30% of inventory in the summer Mixed Layer (ML; 10 m) in the Resolute Passage, and a concentrating mechanism with potential implications for exposures to organisms such as ice algae, and phytoplankton.

Keywords
Pesticides, Sea ice, Melt ponds, Arctic sea
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132072 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.122 (DOI)000395353600144 ()28038873 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sánchez-Osorio, J. L., Macías-Zamora, J. V., Ramírez-Álvarez, N. & Bidleman, T. F. (2017). Organochlorine pesticides in residential soils and sediments within two main agricultural areas of northwest Mexico: concentrations, enantiomer compositions and potential sources. Chemosphere, 173, 275-287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organochlorine pesticides in residential soils and sediments within two main agricultural areas of northwest Mexico: concentrations, enantiomer compositions and potential sources
2017 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 173, p. 275-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The agricultural Mexicali and Yaqui valleys (MV, YV) in northwest Mexico were heavily treated with organochlorine pesticides in the past. Residential soils and agricultural drain sediments were sampled in 2008–2009 and analyzed for DDTs (o,p′- and p,p′- isomers of DDE, DDD and DDT); hexachlorocyclohexanes (α-, β-, γ- and δ-HCH) and chlordanes (trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, heptachlor and heptachlor exo-epoxide). Geometric means (GMs) (ng g−1 dry weight) were: MV soils (n = 27) ΣDDT 22, ΣHCH 0.80, ΣCHL 0.88; YV soils (n = 25) ΣDDT 5.0, ΣHCH 0.23, ΣCHL 0.67; MV sediments (n = 3) ΣDDT 5.0, ΣHCH 0.23, ΣCHL 0.53; YV sediments (n = 8) ΣDDT 2.6, ΣHCH 0.12, ΣCHL 0.090. GMs were significantly higher (p &lt; 0.05) in MV than YV soils for ΣDDT and ΣHCH, but not for ΣCHL. Comparison to worldwide regulatory guideline values (RGVs) for residential soils showed all compounds below mean or GM RGVs, but above the lowest RGV in some cases. Low p,p′-DDT/(p,p′-DDT + p,p′-DDE) in most soils indicated aged residues. Lack of p,p′-DDT metabolism might account for its dominance in a few soils. HCH isomer profiles suggested aged technical HCH in the YV, and technical HCH + lindane in the MV. Heptachlor dominated the ΣCHL, probably from application of technical heptachlor as well as chlordane. Chiral compounds were nonracemic in soils and sediments and indicated enantioselective microbial degradation of (+)α-HCH, (−)trans-chlordane, (−)cis-chlordane and (+)o,p′-DDT. Depletion of (+)o,p′-DDT in soils may account for similar enantiomer signatures previously reported in air of northwest Mexico.

Keywords
Organochlorine pesticides, Soil, Sediment, Enantiomers, Mexico
National Category
Chemical Sciences Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130649 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.01.010 (DOI)000395213700031 ()
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Weidemann, E., Andersson, P. L., Bidleman, T., Boman, C., Carlin, D. J., Collina, E., . . . Jansson, S. (2016). 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources. Environmental science and pollution research international, 23(8), 8141-8159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources
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2016 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 8141-8159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in UmeAyen, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

Keywords
Products of incomplete combustion, Human health, Soot, Particles, Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, Polychlorinated dibenzofurans, Congress paper
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121585 (URN)10.1007/s11356-016-6308-y (DOI)000374994600105 ()26906006 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F., Nygren, O. & Tysklind, M. (2016). Field estimates of polyurethane foam: air partition coefficients for hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and bromoanisoles. Chemosphere, 159, 126-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Field estimates of polyurethane foam: air partition coefficients for hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and bromoanisoles
2016 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 159, p. 126-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Partition coefficients of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between polyurethane foam (PUF) and air (KPA) are needed in the estimation of sampling rates for PUF disk passive air samplers. We determined KPA in field experiments by conducting long-term (24-48 h) air sampling to saturate PUF traps and shorter runs (2-4 h) to measure air concentrations. Sampling events were done at daily mean temperatures ranging from 1.9 to 17.5 °C. Target compounds were hexachlorobenzene (HCB), alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), 2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DiBA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TriBA). KPA (mL g(-1)) was calculated from quantities on the PUF traps at saturation (ng g(-1)) divided by air concentrations (ng mL(-1)). Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔHPA, kJ mol(-1)) were determined from the slopes of log KPA/mL g(-1) versus 1/T(K) for HCB and the bromoanisoles, KPA of α-HCH was measured only at 14.3 to 17.5 °C and ΔHPA was not determined. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) at 15 °C were HCB = 7.37; α-HCH = 8.08; 2,4-DiBA = 7.26 and 2,4,6-TriBA = 7.26. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) were compared with predictions based on an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) model (Shoeib and Harner, 2002a) and a polyparameter linear free relationship (pp-LFER) model (Kamprad and Goss, 2007) using different sets of solute parameters. Predicted KP values varied by factors of 3 to over 30, depending on the compound and the model. Such discrepancies provide incentive for experimental measurements of KPA for other SVOCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Polyurethane foam, Air sampling, Semivolatile organic compounds, Bromoanisoles, Polyparameter linear free energy relationship, Octanol-air partition coefficient
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124432 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.05.040 (DOI)000380417800015 ()27285381 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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