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Tysklind, Mats
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Bidleman, T., Andersson, A., Jantunen, L. M., Kucklick, J. R., Kylin, H., Letcher, R. J., . . . Wong, F. (2019). A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems. Emerging Contaminants, 5, 89-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems
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2019 (English)In: Emerging Contaminants, ISSN 2405-6650, E-ISSN 2405-6642, Vol. 5, p. 89-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Halogenated natural products (HNPs) are organic compounds containing bromine, chlorine, iodine, and rarely fluorine. HNPs comprise many classes of compounds, ranging in complexity from halocarbons to higher molecular weight compounds, which often contain oxygen and/or nitrogen atoms in addition to halogens. Many HNPs are biosynthesized by marine bacteria, macroalgae, phytoplankton, tunicates, corals, worms, sponges and other invertebrates. This paper reviews HNPs in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems and is based on sections of Chapter 2.16 in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) assessment Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern (AMAP, 2017) which deal with the higher molecular weight HNPs. Material is updated and expanded to include more Nordic examples. Much of the chapter is devoted to “bromophenolic” HNPs, viz bromophenols (BPs) and transformation products bromoanisoles (BAs), hydroxylated and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs, MeO-BDEs) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), since these HNPs are most frequently reported. Others discussed are 2,2′ -dimethoxy-3,3′ ,5,5′ -tetrabromobiphenyl (2,2′ -dimethoxy-BB80), polyhalogenated 1′- methyl-1,2′-bipyrroles (PMBPs), polyhalogenated 1,1′ -dimethyl-2,2′ -bipyrroles (PDBPs), polyhalogenated N-methylpyrroles (PMPs), polyhalogenated N-methylindoles (PMIs), bromoheptyl- and bromooctyl pyrroles, (1R,2S,4R,5R,1′E)-2-bromo-1-bromomethyl-1,4-dichloro-5-(2′-chloroethenyl)-5- methylcyclohexane (mixed halogenated compound MHC-1), polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivatives (PBHDs) and polyhalogenated carbazoles (PHCs). Aspects of HNPs covered are physicochemical properties, sources and production, transformation processes, concentrations and trends in the physical environment and biota (marine and freshwater). Toxic properties of some HNPs and a discussion of how climate change might affect HNPs production and distribution are also included. The review concludes with a summary of research needs to better understand the role of HNPs as “chemicals of emerging Arctic concern”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Halogenated natural products (HNPs), Arctic, Scandinavia, Baltic Sea, Air, Water, Sediment, Biota, Physicochemical properties
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157149 (URN)10.1016/j.emcon.2019.02.007 (DOI)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Shanmugam, K., Gadhamshetty, V., Yadav, P., Athanassiadis, D., Tysklind, M. & Upadhyayula, V. K. .. (2019). Advanced High-Strength Steel and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Body in White for Passenger Cars: Environmental Performance and Sustainable Return on Investment under Different Propulsion Modes. ACS SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY & ENGINEERING, 7(5), 4951-4963
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advanced High-Strength Steel and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Body in White for Passenger Cars: Environmental Performance and Sustainable Return on Investment under Different Propulsion Modes
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2019 (English)In: ACS SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY & ENGINEERING, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 4951-4963Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vehicle lightweighting strategies must deliver sustainable returns to customers and society. This work evaluates the sustainable return on investment (SROI) of lightweighted advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP)-intensive multimaterial bodies in white (BIWs) for automobiles. The SROI depends on the lightweighted BIW's manufacturing cost and the difference in sustainable cost between a baseline (mild steel) BIW and the lightweighted alternative. The sustainable cost is the sum of the customer's lifetime fuel (or electricity) costs and the costs of environmental externalities. A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted to quantify the environmental impacts of CFRP and AHSS BIWs in gasoline-fueled cars, bioethanol (E85)-fueled cars, and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) driven for a lifetime distance of 200 000 km. For cars fueled with gasoline- or corn-based bioethanol, the CFRP BIW yielded the lowest SROI; the AHSS BIW performed best for BEVs and cars fueled with wood bioethanol. However, the commercial availability of recycled carbon fiber should increase the SROI of the CFRP BIW in the future. Additionally, the SROI of CFRP BIWs is maximized when carbon fiber production is done using energy from a low carbon-intensity electric grid or decentralized sources such as waste-to-energy incineration plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
Keywords
Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRP), Advanced high strength steel (AHSS), Automotive dy in white, Automotive lightweighting Environmental performance, Sustainable return on vestment, Woody or corn bioethanol, Battery electric vehicle (BEV)
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157515 (URN)10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b05588 (DOI)000460600500042 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T. F., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Haglund, P., Kupryianchyk, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2019). Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 881-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517 (URN)10.1039/C9EM00042A (DOI)000468787800009 ()31032511 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Östman, M., Björlenius, B., Fick, J. & Tysklind, M. (2019). Effect of full-scale ozonation and pilot-scale granular activated carbon on the removal of biocides, antimycotics and antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant. Science of the Total Environment, 649, 1117-1123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of full-scale ozonation and pilot-scale granular activated carbon on the removal of biocides, antimycotics and antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant
2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 649, p. 1117-1123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several micropollutants show low removal efficiencies in conventional sewage treatment plants, and therefore enter the aquatic environment. To reduce the levels of micropollutants in sewage effluent, and thereby the effects on biota, a number of extra treatment steps are currently being evaluated. Two such techniques are ozonation and adsorption onto activated carbon. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of Sweden's first full-scale ozonation treatment plant at removing a number of antibiotics, antimycotics and biocides. The effect of adding granular activated carbon (GAC) on a pilot scale and pilot-scale ozonation were also evaluated. The conventional treatment (13,000 PE) with the add-on of full-scale ozonation (0.55 g O3/g Total organic carbon (TOC)) was able to remove most of the studied compounds (>90%), except for benzotriazoles and fluconazole (<50%). Adsorption on GAC on a pilot scale showed a higher removal efficiency than ozonation (>80% for all studied compounds). Three types of GAC were evaluated and shown to have different removal efficiencies. In particular, the GAC with the smallest particle sizes exhibited the highest removal efficiency. The results demonstrate that it is important to select an appropriate type of carbon to achieve the removal goal for specific target compounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Biocides, Antibiotics, Ozonation, GAC, Removal efficiency, Wastewater
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151966 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.382 (DOI)000446076500106 ()2-s2.0-85052640940 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Agency for Marine and Water Management
Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Gojkovic, Z., Lindberg, R., Tysklind, M. & Funk, C. (2019). Northern green algae have the capacity to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 170, 644-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Northern green algae have the capacity to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients
2019 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 170, p. 644-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eight recently isolated microalgal species from Northern Sweden and the culture collection strain Scenedesmus obliquus RISE (UTEX 417) were tested for their ability to remove 19 pharmaceuticals from growth medium upon cultivation in short light path, flat panel photobioreactors. While the growth of one algal species, Chlorellasorokiniana B1-1, was completely inhibited by the addition of pharmaceuticals, and the one of Scenedesmus sp. B2-2 was strongly inhibited, the other algal strains grew well and produced biomass.

In general, lipophilic compounds were removed highly efficient from the culture medium by the microalgae (>70% in average within 2 days). The most lipophilic compounds Biperiden, Trihexyphenidyl, Clomipramine and Amitriptyline significantly accumulated in the biomass of most algal species, with a positive correlation between accumulation and their total biomass content. More persistent in the growth medium were hydrophilic compounds like Caffeine, Fluconazole, Trimetoprim, Codeine, Carbamazepin, Oxazepam and Tramadol, which were detected in amounts of above 60% in average after algal treatment.

While Coelastrella sp. 3–4 and Coelastrum astroideum RW10 were most efficient to accumulate certain compounds in their biomass, two algae species, Chlorella vulgaris13-1 and Chlorella saccharophila RNY, were not only highly efficient in removing all 19 pharmaceuticals from the growth medium within 12 days, at the same time only small amounts of these compounds accumulated in their biomass allowing its further use. Chlorella vulgaris 13-1 was able to remove most compounds within 6 days of growth, while Chlorella saccharophila RNY needed 8–10 days.”Wild” Nordic microalgae therefore are able to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients, equally or more efficient than the investigated culture collection strain, thereby demonstrating their possible use in sustainable wastewater reclamation in Nordic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Pharmaceuticals, Green microalgae, Photodegradation, Removal efficiency
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156578 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.12.032 (DOI)000456890700078 ()30579165 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 2013-006259Swedish Energy Agency, 38239-1Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-92Swedish Research Council Formas, 213-2014-1504VINNOVA, 2017-03301
Available from: 2019-02-22 Created: 2019-02-22 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
diva2:1349776
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence, transportation, and distribution difference of typical herbicides from estuary to bay
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 130, article id UNSP 104858Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In several watersheds, agricultural activities are the cause of pollution, mainly due to the discharge of herbicides. Often, these herbicide plumes are transported to the surrounding bays. Samples of water, suspended particulate sediments (SPSs), and sediments from 37 sites in the Jiaozhou Bay in the western Pacific Ocean were collected in April 2018. The total concentrations of atrazine and acetochlor in these samples were analyzed, that showed different patterns in each sampled area. Atrazine had 2-3 times higher concentrations in coastal areas and bays compared to the estuary, indicating that it had a higher residence time in the marine environment. In contrast, acetochlor concentration decreased with an increase in the depth of seawater. Both the spatial distributions and the vertical concentrations in water, SPS, and sediment proved that these two herbicides had different responses during transportation from the estuary to the bay. Despite the significant difference in concentration of the two herbicides in the water and sediment, their spatially averaged value in SPS was very close, indicating that the particles had saturated sorption capability. The organic carbon normalized partition coefficient (LogK(oc)) was used to explain the partitioning of the herbicides between water and sediment. The LogK(oc) difference between herbicides demonstrated that acetochlor was strongly phase partitioned in the coastal and the bay areas, thereby causing similar distributions of acetochlor in the three matrices. Atrazine had a higher LogK(oc) value in the estuary, which explained its higher concentration in the estuary SPS. The correlation and redundancy analyses both demonstrated that the concentrations of the herbicides in water were sensitive to dissolved organic carbon and dissolved oxygen. The current tides and bathymetry were the critical factors in determining the spatial distribution of herbicides in the water and sediment, resulting in a low herbicide load in the river mouth area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2019
Keywords
Atrazine, Acetochlor, Phase partition, Diffuse pollution, Suspended particulate sediment, mienclosed bay
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162301 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.05.052 (DOI)000477934800061 ()31212164 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
Wang, H., Mustafa, M., Yu, G., Östman, M., Cheng, Y., Wang, Y. & Tysklind, M. (2019). Oxidation of emerging biocides and antibiotics in wastewater by ozonation and the electro-peroxone process. Chemosphere, 235, 575-585
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxidation of emerging biocides and antibiotics in wastewater by ozonation and the electro-peroxone process
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2019 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 235, p. 575-585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the abatement of a number of antimicrobials frequently detected in municipal wastewater by conventional ozonation and a recently developed ozone-based advanced oxidation process, the electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process. A synthetic water and a real secondary wastewater effluent were spiked with fourteen antimicrobials, including antibiotics and biocides, and then treated by the two processes. The results show that most of the antibiotics investigated (e.g., ofloxacin, trimethoprim, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin) readily react with ozone (O3) and could therefore be efficiently eliminated from the water matrices by direct O3 oxidation during both processes. In contrast, most of the biocides tested in this study (e.g., clotrimazole, pentamidine, bixafen, propiconazole, and fluconazole) were only moderately reactive, or non-reactive, with O3. Therefore, these biocides were removed at considerably lower rate than the antibiotics during the two ozone-based processes, with hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation playing an important role in their abatement mechanisms. When compared with conventional ozonation, the E-peroxone process is defined by the in situ electrogeneration of hydrogen peroxide, which considerably enhances the transformation of O3 to OH. As a result, the E-peroxone process significantly accelerated the abatement of biocides and required a considerably shorter treatment time to eliminate all of the tested compounds from the water matrices than conventional ozonation. In addition, the E-peroxone process enhanced the contributions of OH fractions to the abatement of moderately ozone reactive benzotriazoles. These results demonstrate that the E-peroxone process holds promise as an effective tertiary treatment option for enhancing the abatement of ozone-resistant antimicrobials in wastewater.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Advanced oxidation process, Antibiotics, Biocides, Electro-peroxone, Hydroxyl radicals, Ozone
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering Other Chemical Engineering Water Treatment Microbiology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163342 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.06.205 (DOI)000487567000062 ()31276870 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Shanmugam, K., Baroth, A., Nande, S., Abdelfattah, D., Tysklind, M. & Upadhyayula, V. K. .. (2019). Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Operating Compressed Biomethane (CBM) Transit Buses in Cities of Developing Nations: A Case Study. Sustainability, 11(15), Article ID 4190.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Cost Benefit Analysis of Operating Compressed Biomethane (CBM) Transit Buses in Cities of Developing Nations: A Case Study
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2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 15, article id 4190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities in developing nations have to deal with two significant sustainability challenges amidst rampant urbanization. First, consumer-generated food waste is increasing monumentally since open dumping is still followed as a predominant practice, the negative environmental externalities associated with food waste disposal are growing beyond manageable proportions. Second, the dependency on conventional fuels like diesel to operate transit buses, which is one of the major causes for deteriorating urban air quality. A nexus established between food waste management and operation of transit buses can improve the sustainable performance of cities in developing nations. In this study, a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) supported Social Cost-Benefit Analysis (SCBA) is performed by considering a hypothetical scenario of establishing a large food waste treating biomethanation plant in Mumbai, India. The food waste from the city is transported to a biomethanation plant where it is subjected to an anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The biogas produced as a byproduct is upgraded to compressed biomethane (CBM) and used as a vehicle fuel to operate transit buses within the city. The LCA results suggest that CBM buses can reduce greenhouse gas and particulate matter emissions by 60% compared to diesel or compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. Fossil depletion potential of CBM buses is 98% lower than diesel, suggesting CBM’s importance in decoupling developing nations dependency on imported crude oil. The SCBA considers: (a) costs to stakeholders, i.e., fees for open dumping of food waste and cost of fuel for operating transit buses; and (b) social costs incurred by negative environmental externalities (obtained by monetizing LCA results) resulting from both, open dumping as well as fuel combustion. SCBA results indicate that the food waste-based CBM model can save 6.86 billion Indian rupees (USD 99.4 million) annually for Mumbai. The savings are made due to a reduction in stakeholder’s costs (fuel) coupled with societal, i.e., environmental externality costs if entire transit bus fleet operates on CBM fuel instead of conventional fuel mix (33:67 diesel to CNG) currently used. Although the study is performed for Mumbai, the results will be replicable to any city of developing nations facing similar issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
compressed biomethane for transit buses, food waste management in cities of developing nations, life cycle assessment, social cost benefit analysis, private and sustainable rate of returns
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162914 (URN)10.3390/su11154190 (DOI)000485230200195 ()2-s2.0-85070478704 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Assefa, A., Tysklind, M., Bignert, A., Josefsson, S. & Wiberg, K. (2019). Sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans to Baltic Sea herring. Chemosphere, 218, 493-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans to Baltic Sea herring
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2019 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 218, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in herring (Clupea harengus) remain high in several parts of the Baltic Sea, despite declines in PCDD/F emissions since the 1980s. The reasons behind this are not well understood. This study applied a statistical modeling approach where sources of PCDD/Fs that contaminate Baltic biota were quantitatively assessed by analyzing existing datasets. PCDD/F patterns were extracted from a herring dataset using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The extracted biota patterns were transformed into sediment patterns using fish-to-sediment transformation factors, and the resulting patterns were compared with known source PCDD/F patterns. The model distinguished three model patterns, which explained 85% of the data. These patterns were matched to tetra-chlorophenol (TCP), penta-chlorophenol/atmospheric background (PCP/AB), and thermal source patterns, respectively. The thermal source was the largest contributor to toxic equivalents (TEQ) in herring, but the level decreased from 42 ± 9.0 pg TEQ g−1 lipid weight (lw) before year 2000 (pre-2000) to 15 ± 2.4 pg TEQ g−1 lw post-2000, i.e., a decline of around one-third in the original TEQ concentration. The contribution of TCP more than doubled, from 2.1 ± 0.62 pg TEQ g−1 lw to 5.6 ± 1.1 pg TEQ g−1 lw, and the relative contribution of PCP/AB also increased. These increasing trends suggest that, as primary air emissions of PCDD/Fs are managed and levels decline, the impact of TCP and PCP/AB sources on Baltic Sea biota will become more important over time and that PCDD/F-contaminated sites in coastal areas and marine environments require more attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, PCDD/Fs, Source tracing, Baltic Sea, Herring, Positive matrix factorization, Transformation factors, Receptor modeling
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153732 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.11.051 (DOI)000456640900055 ()2-s2.0-85057102499 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ECOCHANGE
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 09/181Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 2219-17-002Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Massei, R., Hollert, H., Krauss, M., von Tümpling, W., Weidauer, C., Haglund, P., . . . Brack, W. (2019). Toxicity and neurotoxicity profiling of contaminated sediments from Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden): a multi-endpoint assay with Zebrafish embryos. Environmental Sciences Europe, 31, Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toxicity and neurotoxicity profiling of contaminated sediments from Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden): a multi-endpoint assay with Zebrafish embryos
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 31, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The toxicological characterization of sediments is an essential task to monitor the quality of aquatic environments. Many hazardous pollutants may accumulate in sediments and pose a risk to the aquatic community. The present study provides an attempt to integrate a diagnostic whole mixture assessment workflow based on a slightly modified Danio rerio embryo acute toxicity test with chemical characterization. Danio rerio embryos were directly exposed to sieved sediment (≤ 63 μm) for 96 h. Sediment samples were collected from three polluted sites (Kramfors, Sundsvall and Örnsköldsvik) in the Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden) which are characterized by a long history of pulp and paper industry impact. Effect data were supported by chemical analyses of 237 organic pollutants and 30 trace elements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156256 (URN)10.1186/s12302-019-0188-y (DOI)000457727700001 ()
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
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