umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Glader, Eva-Lotta
Publications (10 of 47) Show all publications
Darehed, D., Blom, M., Glader, E.-L., Niklasson, J., Norrving, B., Bray, B. D. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Diurnal variations in the quality of stroke care in Sweden. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 140(2), 123-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diurnal variations in the quality of stroke care in Sweden
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: A recent study of acute stroke patients in England and Wales revealed several patterns of temporal variation in quality of care. We hypothesized that similar patterns would be present in Sweden and aimed to describe these patterns. Additionally, we aimed to investigate whether hospital type conferred resilience against temporal variation.

MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted this nationwide registry-based study using data from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) including all adult patients registered with acute stroke between 2011 and 2015. Outcomes included process measures and survival. We modeled time of presentation as on/off hours, shifts, day of week, 4h and 12 h time blocks. We studied hospital resilience by comparing outcomes across hospital types.

RESULTS: 113862 stroke events in 72 hospitals were included. The process indicators and survival all showed significant temporal variation. Door-to-needle (DTN) time within 30 minutes was less likely during nighttime than daytime (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.41-0.60). Patients admitted during off-hours had lower odds of direct stroke unit (SU) admission (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.70-0.75). 30-day survival was lower in nighttime versus daytime presentations (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.96). The effects of temporal variation differed significantly between hospital types for DTN time within 30 minutes and direct SU admission where university hospitals were more resilient than specialized non-university hospitals.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that variation in quality of care and survival is present throughout the whole week. We also found that university hospitals were more resilient to temporal variation than specialized non-university hospitals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Off hours, Quality of care, Stroke, Temporal variation, Weekend effect, Weekly variation
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158646 (URN)10.1111/ane.13112 (DOI)000474934000006 ()31046131 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Bråndal, A., Eriksson, M., Glader, E.-L. & Wester, P. (2019). Effect of early supported discharge after stroke on patient reported outcome based on the Swedish Riksstroke registry. BMC Neurology, 19, Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of early supported discharge after stroke on patient reported outcome based on the Swedish Riksstroke registry
2019 (English)In: BMC Neurology, ISSN 1471-2377, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 19, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The efficacy of early supported discharge (ESD) has not been tested in current stroke care setting, which provide relatively short hospital stays, access to hyper-acute therapies and early carotid stenosis interventions. This study aimed to compare patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) among patients with stroke that received modern stroke unit care with or without ESD.

Methods: Observational study of 30,232 patients with first-ever stroke registered in the Riksstroke registry in Sweden, between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013. Patient characteristics were collected from the Riksstroke and Statistics Sweden databases. The primary outcome was satisfaction with the rehabilitation at 3 months after discharge. Secondary outcome were information about stroke provided, tiredness/fatigue, pain, dysthymia/ depression, general health status and dependence in activities of daily living (mobility, toileting and dressing) at 3 months after the stroke. We used separate multivariable logistic regression models for each PROM variable to analyze associations between PROMs and ESD/no ESD.

Results: The ESD group comprised 1495 participants: the control group comprised 28,737 participants. Multivariable logistic regression models of PROMs showed that, compared to controls, the ESD group was more satisfied with rehabilitation after discharge (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.17–2.49), experienced less dysthymia/depression (OR: 0.68, 95% 0.55–0.84) and showed more independence in mobility (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.17–1.92), toileting (OR: 1.30, 95%CI: 1.05–1.61), and dressing (OR: 1.23, 95%CI: 1.02–1.48).

Conclusion: In the setting of modern stroke unit care, ESD appeared to have positive effects on stroke rehabilitation, in the subacute phase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Stroke, Early supported discharge, Rehabilitation, Patient reported outcome measurement
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Neurology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120124 (URN)10.1186/s12883-019-1268-8 (DOI)000461384100001 ()30866844 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062847136 (Scopus ID)
Note

Originally included in thesis  in manuscript form with title: "Effect of early supported discharge after stroke on patient reported outcome: observational study from the Swedish Riksstroke registry".

Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Darehed, D., Blom, M., Glader, E.-L., Niklasson, J., Norrving, B. & Eriksson, M. (2018). Acute stroke patients are subject to seasonal variation in quality of care and survival: a Swedish nationwide registry-based study. International Journal of Stroke, 13, 177-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute stroke patients are subject to seasonal variation in quality of care and survival: a Swedish nationwide registry-based study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 13, p. 177-177Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153663 (URN)000448113303022 ()
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Glader, E.-L., Norrving, B., Stegmayr, B. & Asplund, K. (2017). Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden. Brain and Behavior, 7(4), Article ID e00654.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e00654Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Ambulance services and stroke alerts reduce the time from stroke onset to acute stroke diagnosis. We describe the use of stroke alerts and ambulance services in different hospitals and patient groups and their relationship with reperfusion therapy. Methods: This nationwide study included 49,907 patients admitted with acute stroke who were registered in The Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) in 2011-2012. Results: The proportions of patients admitted as stroke alerts out of all acute stroke admissions varied from 12.2% to 45.7% in university hospitals (n=9), 0.5% to 38.7% in specialized nonuniversity hospitals (n=22), and 4.2% to 40.3% in community hospitals (n=41). Younger age, atrial fibrillation (AF), living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were factors associated with a higher probability of stroke alerts. Living alone, primary school education, non-European origin, previous stroke, diabetes, smoking, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were associated with a lower probability of stroke alert. The proportion of patients arriving at the hospital by ambulance varied from 60.3% to 94.5%. Older age, living alone, primary school education, being born in a European country, previous stroke, AF, dependency in ADL, living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were associated with ambulance services. Hospital stroke alert frequencies correlated strongly with reperfusion rates (r=.75). Conclusion: Acute stroke alerts have a significant potential to improve stroke reperfusion rates. Prehospital stroke management varies conspicuously between hospitals and patient groups, and the elderly and patients living alone have a markedly reduced likelihood of stroke alerts.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132774 (URN)10.1002/brb3.654 (DOI)000399452500010 ()28413705 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ullberg, T., Glader, E.-L., Zia, E., Petersson, J., Eriksson, M. & Norrving, B. (2017). Associations between Ischemic Stroke Follow-Up, Socioeconomic Status, and Adherence to Secondary Preventive Drugs in Southern Sweden: Observations from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke). Neuroepidemiology, 48(1/2), 32-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between Ischemic Stroke Follow-Up, Socioeconomic Status, and Adherence to Secondary Preventive Drugs in Southern Sweden: Observations from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke)
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 48, no 1/2, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Currently, the knowledge that one has on adequate stroke follow-up practices is limited. We report associations between 90-day stroke follow-up, socio-economy and adherence to secondary prevention in southern Sweden.

METHODS: Data on 5,602 patients with ischemic stroke January 1, 2008-December 31, 2010, were obtained from Riksstroke and linked to official registers for information on education, birth country, doctor's follow-ups, and secondary prevention. Primary adherence at 4 months and persistence at 14 months post-stroke were calculated for warfarin, statins, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet drugs.

RESULTS: The 90-day follow-up rate was 75%. Patients not receiving a 90-day follow-up had lower age-adjusted OR of persistent drug use at 14 months for antihypertensive agents (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.60-0.91) and for antiplatelet drugs (OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.60-0.87). Drug adherence rates 14 months post-stroke were 85% for antiplatelet drugs, 69% for warfarin, 88% for antihypertensive agents, and 76% for statins. One in three patients discontinued using one or more drug class within 14 months, and nonadherence was associated with activities of daily living dependency at 3 months (age-adjusted OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.57-0.69), but not with age, gender, or educational status.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of secondary preventive drugs decreases over the first year after stroke and remains suboptimal. Specific reasons for nonadherence warrant further study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2017
Keywords
Ischemic stroke, Secondary prevention, Medication adherence, Socio-economic factors, Follow-up
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131978 (URN)10.1159/000456618 (DOI)000403361900004 ()28237982 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Glader, E.-L., Jonsson, B., Norrving, B. & Eriksson, M. (2017). Socioeconomic factors' effect on return to work after first stroke. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 135(6), 608-613
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic factors' effect on return to work after first stroke
2017 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 135, no 6, p. 608-613Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this nationwide study was to analyze how functional status and socioeconomic status affect return to work (RTW) among younger patients with first-time stroke in a Sweden.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: This register-based cohort study included employed patients aged 25-55 with first-time stroke between 2008 and 2011 and primary outcome was RTW within 1 year after stroke. Data regarding functional status and employment status were retrieved from the Swedish Stroke Register, Riksstroke, and socioeconomic data (income, education, and country of birth) from Statistics Sweden.

RESULTS: We included 2539 patients who had answered the question on RTW, and 1880 (74.0%) had RTW within 12 months. Patients with low income (69.9% in lowest income group vs 79.9% in highest group, P<.001), patients born in countries outside the Nordic countries (Sweden 75.5%, Nordic countries 74.3%, European countries 61.7%, other countries 57.3%, P<.001), and the youngest patients (25-34, 63.1%; 35-44, 75.9%; 45-55, 74.3%; P=.008) were less likely to RTW. Pain, low mood, and answering the questionnaire with help were more common in low socioeconomic groups, and when adjusting for these variables, together with age and sex, income and country of birth were no longer independent predictors for RTW.

CONCLUSION: Patients with low socioeconomic status less often RTW 1 year after stroke.Impaired functional status after stroke is more common in patients with lower socioeconomic status and mediates socioeconomic differences in RTW. Improvement of functional status should be targeted to facilitate RTW among stroke patients with low socioeconomic status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
return to work, socioeconomic factors, stroke
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124292 (URN)10.1111/ane.12639 (DOI)000400157100003 ()27439693 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-02 Created: 2016-08-02 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Pennlert, J., Asplund, K., Glader, E.-L., Norrving, B. & Eriksson, M. (2017). Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Stroke Recurrence: Persisting Gaps Observed in a Nationwide Swedish Study 2001 to 2012.. Stroke, 48(6), 1518-1523
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Stroke Recurrence: Persisting Gaps Observed in a Nationwide Swedish Study 2001 to 2012.
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1518-1523Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This nationwide observational study aimed to investigate how socioeconomic status is associated with risk of stroke recurrence and how possible associations change over time.

METHODS: This study included 168 295 patients, previously independent in activities of daily living, with a first-ever stroke in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) 2001 to 2012. Riksstroke was linked with Statistics Sweden as to add individual information on education and income. Subdistribution hazard regression was used to analyze time from 28 days after first stroke to stroke recurrence, accounting for the competing risk of other causes of death.

RESULTS: Median time of follow-up was 3.0 years. During follow-up, 23 560 patients had a first recurrent stroke, and 53 867 died from other causes. The estimated cumulative incidence of stroke recurrence was 5.3% at 1 year, and 14.3% at 5 years. Corresponding incidence for other deaths were 10.3% and 30.2%. Higher education and income were associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence. After adjusting for confounding variables, university versus primary school education returned a hazard ratio of 0.902; 95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.942, and the highest versus the lowest income tertile a hazard ratio of 0.955; 95% confidence interval, 0.922 to 0.989. The risk of stroke recurrence decreased during the study period, but the inverse effect of socioeconomic status on risk of recurrence did not change significantly.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite a declining risk of stroke recurrence over time, the differences in recurrence risk between different socioeconomic groups remained at a similar level in Sweden during 2001 to 2012.

Keywords
education, incidence, income, recurrence, socioeconomic factors, stroke
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134398 (URN)10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.015643 (DOI)000401819300027 ()28465458 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sjölander, M., Eriksson, M. & Glader, E.-L. (2016). Inequalities in medication adherence to statin treatment after stroke: A nationwide observational study. European Stroke Journal, 1(2), 101-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inequalities in medication adherence to statin treatment after stroke: A nationwide observational study
2016 (English)In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The objective was to investigate differences in adherence to statins after stroke based on age, sex, socioeconomic status and country of birth.

Patients and methods: Patients with ischemic stroke in 2009–2010 were included from the Swedish stroke register. Adherence to statin treatment was measured over two years as proportion of days covered with 80% as cut-off for adherence. Income, education, and country of birth were obtained from official registers. Factors associated with adherence were controlled for in multivariable logistic regression.

Results: Of 15,192 included patients, 73.9% had an adherence rate 80%. The oldest (85þ years) and youngest (18–54 years) had the lowest adherence, and a smaller proportion of women were adherent (odds ratio (OR) 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77–0.92). Adherence was less common in patients born in Nordic countries (OR 0.82; 95% CI (0.68–0.97), Europe (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.65–0.93), and in non-European countries (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.50–0.84) compared to Sweden-born. Patients with university education were to a lower extent adherent compared to patients with primary school education (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.72–0.91). There was no association between adherence and income.

Discussion: The study was based on individual level real-life data with national coverage. Adherence was estimated from data on filled prescriptions, but filled prescription does not mean that drugs are used as intended.

Conclusion: Adherence to statin treatment over two years was suboptimal, and adherence was less common among women, patients born outside of Sweden and patients with university education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
schemic stroke, secondary prevention, statins, medication adherence, socioeconomic factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119790 (URN)10.1177/2396987316646026 (DOI)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindmark, A., van Rompaye, B., Goetghebeur, E., Glader, E.-L. & Eriksson, M. (2016). The Importance of Integrating Clinical Relevance and Statistical Significance in the Assessment of Quality of Care - Illustrated Using the Swedish Stroke Register. PLoS ONE, 11(4), Article ID e0153082.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Integrating Clinical Relevance and Statistical Significance in the Assessment of Quality of Care - Illustrated Using the Swedish Stroke Register
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e0153082Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: When profiling hospital performance, quality inicators are commonly evaluated through hospital-specific adjusted means with confidence intervals. When identifying deviations from a norm, large hospitals can have statistically significant results even for clinically irrelevant deviations while important deviations in small hospitals can remain undiscovered. We have used data from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) to illustrate the properties of a benchmarking method that integrates considerations of both clinical relevance and level of statistical significance.

METHODS: The performance measure used was case-mix adjusted risk of death or dependency in activities of daily living within 3 months after stroke. A hospital was labeled as having outlying performance if its case-mix adjusted risk exceeded a benchmark value with a specified statistical confidence level. The benchmark was expressed relative to the population risk and should reflect the clinically relevant deviation that is to be detected. A simulation study based on Riksstroke patient data from 2008-2009 was performed to investigate the effect of the choice of the statistical confidence level and benchmark value on the diagnostic properties of the method.

RESULTS: Simulations were based on 18,309 patients in 76 hospitals. The widely used setting, comparing 95% confidence intervals to the national average, resulted in low sensitivity (0.252) and high specificity (0.991). There were large variations in sensitivity and specificity for different requirements of statistical confidence. Lowering statistical confidence improved sensitivity with a relatively smaller loss of specificity. Variations due to different benchmark values were smaller, especially for sensitivity. This allows the choice of a clinically relevant benchmark to be driven by clinical factors without major concerns about sufficiently reliable evidence.

CONCLUSIONS: The study emphasizes the importance of combining clinical relevance and level of statistical confidence when profiling hospital performance. To guide the decision process a web-based tool that gives ROC-curves for different scenarios is provided.

National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119030 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0153082 (DOI)000373608000075 ()27054326 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Söderholm, A., Stegmayr, B., Glader, E.-L. & Asplund, K. (2016). Validation of Hospital Performance Measures of Acute Stroke Care Quality. Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Neuroepidemiology, 46(4), 229-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of Hospital Performance Measures of Acute Stroke Care Quality. Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register
2016 (English)In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Registers are increasingly used to monitor stroke care performance. Fair benchmarking requires sufficient data quality. We have validated acute care data in Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register.

Methods: Completeness was assessed by comparisons with diagnoses at hospital discharge recorded in the compulsory National Patient Register and content validity by comparisons with (a) key variables identified by European stroke experts, and (b) items recorded in other European stroke care performance registers. Five test cases recorded by 67 hospitals were used to estimate inter-hospital reliability.

Results: All 72 Swedish hospitals admitting acute stroke patients participated in Riksstroke. The register was estimated to cover at least 90% of acute stroke patients. It includes 18 of 22 quality indicators identified by international stroke experts and 14 of 15 indicators used by at least 2 stroke performance registers in other European countries. Inter-hospital reliability was high (85%) in 77 of 81 Riksstroke items.

Conclusions: A nationwide stroke care register can be maintained with sufficient data quality to permit between-hospital performance benchmarking. Our experiences may serve as a model for other stroke registers while evaluating data quality.

Keywords
Stroke register, Validation, Data quality, Performance measurement
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Neurology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122591 (URN)10.1159/000444679 (DOI)000376812100001 ()26975057 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications