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Wadell, Karin
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Larsson, L., Johansson, B., Wadell, K., Thilen, U. & Sandberg, C. (2019). Adults with congenital heart disease overestimate their physical activity level. IJC Heart & Vasculature, 22, 13-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adults with congenital heart disease overestimate their physical activity level
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2019 (English)In: IJC Heart & Vasculature, ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 22, p. 13-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical activity reduces the risk of acquired cardiovascular disease, which is of great importance in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). There are diverging data whether physical activity level (PAL) differs between patients with CHD and controls. Furthermore, it is unknown if PAL can be reliably assessed in patients with CHD using self-reported instruments.

Methods: Seventy-five patients with CHD (mean age 37.5 ± 15.5 years, women n = 29 [38.7%]) and 42 age and sex matched controls completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and carried the activity monitor Actiheart over 4 days. Time spent at ≥3 METS ≥21.4 min/day, i.e. reaching the WHO recommendation for PAL to promote health, was used as the outcome measure. Data on PAL obtained from IPAQ were compared with Actiheart.

Results: The proportion of individuals reaching target PAL according to IPAQ was similar in patients with CHD and controls (70.7%vs.76.2%, p = 0.52) as well as between patients with simple and complex lesions. There was an overall difference between IPAQ and Actiheart in detecting recommended PAL (72.6%vs.51.3%, p b 0.001). In a subgroup analysis, this difference was also detected in patients but was borderline for controls. The negative predictive value for IPAQ in detecting insufficient PAL was higher in patients than in controls (73%vs.40%).

Conclusions: The proportion of persons reaching sufficient PAL to promote health was similar in patients and controls. The self-reported instrument overestimated PAL in relation to objective measurements. However, with a high negative predictive value, IPAQ is a potentially useful tool for detecting patients with insufficient PAL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Adult congenital heart disease, Physical activity level, IPAQ, Actiheart
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158111 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcha.2018.11.005 (DOI)000462184100003 ()30480085 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20130472Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150579Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Tistad, M. & Wadell, K. (2019). Can the COPD web be used to promote self-management in patients with COPD in swedish primary care: a controlled pragmatic pilot trial with 3 month- and 12 month follow-up. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 37(1), 69-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the COPD web be used to promote self-management in patients with COPD in swedish primary care: a controlled pragmatic pilot trial with 3 month- and 12 month follow-up
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 69-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Evaluate the feasibility of the COPD Web and its study design and study procedures and to increase the understanding of the potential effect of the tool in order to provide guidance for a future large scale trial.

Design: Parallel-group controlled pragmatic pilot trial.

Subjects: There was a total of 83 patients with COPD (mean age 70 +/- 8 years with a forced expiratory volume in first second percent predicted of 60 +/- 17%). The intervention group (n = 43) was introduced to and had access to the COPD Web in addition to usual care, while the control group (n = 40) received usual care alone.

Main outcome measures: The feasibility of the COPD Web (i.e., if and how the COPD Web was used) was automatically collected through the website, while outcomes on health, conceptual knowledge, and physical activity (PA) were collected through questionnaires at baseline, 3 months and 12 months.

Results: At 3 months, 77% of the intervention group was considered users, and the majority of time spent on the site was related to PA and exercises and was spent during the first month (>80%). In addition, the intervention group reported increased PA (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4, P < .001), increased conceptual knowledge in five domains (OR = 2.6-4.2, all P < .05), and altered disease management strategies (e.g., increased PA) (OR >= 2.7 P < .05) in comparison to the control group. The latter was also different between groups at 12 months (OR = 3.7, P = .044). Knowledge of PA was correlated with level of PA (rho = .425-.512, P < .05) as well as to the use of PA as a strategy to manage their disease (chi(2) = 11.2-32.9, P < .05).

Conclusion: Giving patients with COPD access to the COPD Web in addition to their ordinary primary care might be an effective shorter term (3 month) strategy to promote self-management. However, these results needs to be confirmed in a definitive large-scale trial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
COPD, physical activity, self-management, pragmatic trial, internet-based
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158765 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2019.1569415 (DOI)000462849900009 ()30700230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, T., Nyberg, A., Lundell, S. & Wadell, K. (2019). Web-based support for self-management strategies versus usual care for people with COPD in primary healthcare: a protocol for a randomised, 12-month, parallel-group pragmatic trial. BMJ Open, 9(10), Article ID e030788.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Web-based support for self-management strategies versus usual care for people with COPD in primary healthcare: a protocol for a randomised, 12-month, parallel-group pragmatic trial
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 10, article id e030788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The use of adequate self-management strategies for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may increase the level of physical activity (PA), improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and reduce healthcare use. Whether web-based support in addition to prompts (email and SMS) could be used to promote self-management strategies to facilitate behaviour change in people with COPD is not clear. This clinical trial aims to generate evidence on the effect of a web-based solution, the COPD Web, in a cohort of people with COPD in a primary healthcare context.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The overall design is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with preassessments and postassessments (3 and 12 months) and an implementation and user experience evaluation. People with a diagnosis of COPD, treated in primary healthcare will be eligible for the study. A total of 144 participants will be enrolled by healthcare professionals at included primary healthcare units and, after fulfilled baseline assessments, randomised to either control or intervention group. All participants will receive usual care, a pedometer and a leaflet about the importance of PA. Participants in the intervention will, in addition, get access to the COPD Web, an interactive self-managed website that aims to support people with COPD in self-management strategies. They will also continuously get support from prompts with a focus on behaviour change.The effect on participants' PA, dyspnoea, COPD-related symptoms, HRQoL and health economics will be assessed using accelerometer and questionnaires. To identify enablers and barriers for the use of web-based support to change behaviour, semistructured interviews will be conducted in a subgroup of participants at the 3 months follow-up.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval has been received from the Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå, Sweden. Dnr 2018-274-31. Findings will be presented at conferences, submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals and presented to the involved healthcare professionals, participants and patient organisations.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03746873.

Keywords
eHealth, primary care, pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive, self-management strategies
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Lung Medicine; physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164831 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030788 (DOI)31594889 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Bay, A., Sandberg, C., Thilén, U., Wadell, K. & Johansson, B. (2018). Exercise self-efficacy in adults with congenital heart disease. International Journal of Cardiology: Heart and vasculature, 18, 7-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise self-efficacy in adults with congenital heart disease
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology: Heart and vasculature, E-ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 18, p. 7-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical activity improves health, exercise tolerance and quality of life in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD), and exercise training is in most patients a high-benefit low risk intervention. However, factors that influence the confidence to perform exercise training, i.e. exercise self-efficacy (ESE), in CHD patients are virtually unknown. We aimed to identify factors related to low ESE in adults with CHD, and potential strategies for being physically active.

Methods: Seventy-nine adults with CHD; 38 with simple lesions (16 women) and 41 with complex lesions (17 women) with mean age 36.7 ± 14.6 years and 42 matched controls were recruited. All participants completed questionnaires on ESE and quality of life, carried an activity monitor (Actiheart) during four consecutive days and performed muscle endurance tests.

Results: ESE in patients was categorised into low, based on the lowest quartile within controls, (≤ 29 points, n = 34) and high (> 29 points, n = 45). Patients with low ESE were older (42.9 ± 15.1 vs. 32.0 ± 12.4 years, p = 0.001), had more complex lesions (65% vs. 42%, p = 0.05) more often had New York Heart Association functional class III (24% vs. 4%, p = 0.01) and performed fewer shoulder flexions (32.5 ± 15.5 vs. 47.7 ± 25.0, p = 0.001) compared with those with high ESE. In a logistic multivariate model age (OR; 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10), and number of shoulder flexions (OR; 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99) were associated with ESE.

Conclusion: In this study we show that many adults with CHD have low ESE. Age is an important predictor of low ESE and should, therefore, be considered in counselling patients with CHD. In addition, muscle endurance training may improve ESE, and thus enhance the potential for being physically active in this population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
adult congenital heart disease, exercise self-efficacy, muscle function, physical activity, quality of life
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144626 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcha.2017.12.002 (DOI)000432566900002 ()29349286 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2018-02-08 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Sandberg, C., Hedström, M., Wadell, K., Dellborg, M., Ahnfelt, A., Zetterström, A.-K., . . . Johansson, B. (2018). Home‐based interval training increases endurance capacity in adults with complex congenital heart disease. Congenital Heart Disease, 13(2), 254-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home‐based interval training increases endurance capacity in adults with complex congenital heart disease
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2018 (English)In: Congenital Heart Disease, ISSN 1747-079X, E-ISSN 1747-0803, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 254-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The beneficial effects of exercise training in acquired heart failure and coronary artery disease are well known and have been implemented in current treatment guidelines. Knowledge on appropriate exercise training regimes for adults with congenital heart disease is limited, thus further studies are needed. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of home‐based interval exercise training on maximal endurance capacity and peak exercise capacity.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Methods: Twenty‐six adults with complex congenital heart disease were recruited from specialized units for adult congenital heart disease. Patients were randomized to either an intervention group—12 weeks of home‐based interval exercise training on a cycle ergometer (n = 16), or a control group (n = 10). The latter was instructed to maintain their habitual physical activities. An incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test and a constant work rate cardiopulmonary exercise test at 75% of peak workload were performed preintervention and postintervention.

Results: Twenty‐three patients completed the protocol and were followed (intervention n = 13, control n = 10). Postintervention exercise time at constant work rate cardiopulmonary exercise test increased in the intervention group compared to controls (median[range] 12[–4 to 52]min vs 0[–4 to 5]min, P = .001). At incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, peak VO2 increased 15% within the intervention group (P = .019) compared to 2% within the control group (P = .8). However, in comparison between the groups no difference was found (285[–200 to 535] ml/min vs 17[–380 to 306] ml/min, P = .10). In addition, peak workload at incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test increased in the intervention group compared to controls (20[–10 to 70]W vs 0[–20 to 15]W, P = .003).

Conclusion: Home‐based interval exercise training increased endurance capacity and peak exercise capacity in adults with complex congenital heart disease. Aerobic endurance might be more relevant than peak oxygen uptake with regard to daily activities, and therefore a more clinically relevant measure to evaluate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
adult, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, congenital heart disease, constant work rate, exercise training, interval training
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112857 (URN)10.1111/chd.12562 (DOI)000430117100014 ()29205923 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Lundell, S., Wadell, K., Wiklund, M. & Tistad, M. (2018). Interacting with primary care - experiences of patients with COPD. A qualitative study. Paper presented at 28th International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), SEP 15-19, 2018, Paris, FRANCE. European Respiratory Journal, 52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interacting with primary care - experiences of patients with COPD. A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation aims to support self-management strategies and behaviour change in patients with COPD, which requires an interaction between the patients and healthcare professionals.

Aim: The aim was to explore how patients with COPD interact with primary care, and how they experience this interaction.

Methods: The study was conducted in primary care in northern Sweden. Interviews were performed with patients with COPD (n=13) with varied disease severity, symptoms, sex and age, from four primary care centres. The interviews were analysed with grounded theory.

Results: The analysis ended up in a process of becoming a more active patient with COPD, moving back and forth between different stages of interaction with primary care. The category building self-esteem with empowering support comprises factors that facilitated this process, such as having a positive spirit, experiences of availability, continuity and regular contacts in primary care, along with a good support where the patients felt respected.

The simultaneous and conflicting category struggling with the stigma and threat of COPD captures factors inhibiting the process such as the patients’ fear of dyspnea and death, along with feelings of shame and guilt, the low status of COPD and disempowering support from primary care.

Conclusions: The interaction with primary care could be seen as an ongoing, flexible empowering process for patients with COPD, affected by both inhibiting and facilitating factors. These results could help primary care to empower patients with COPD and facilitate their social process of becoming more active and in control of their disease by using the facilitating factors and decreasing the inhibiting factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society, 2018
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155985 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2018.PA1496 (DOI)000455567102050 ()
Conference
28th International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), SEP 15-19, 2018, Paris, FRANCE
Note

Supplement: 62

Meeting Abstract: PA1496

Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Wadell, K., Wiklund, U., Öhberg, F., Bergmann, E., Holmner, Å. & Blomberg, A. (2018). Longitudinal, home-based study of lung function, saturation and disease-related symptoms in COPD. Paper presented at 28th International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), SEP 15-19, 2018, Paris, FRANCE. European Respiratory Journal, 52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal, home-based study of lung function, saturation and disease-related symptoms in COPD
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2018 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many telehealth (TH) systems have been designed to identify signs of COPD exacerbations, but few previous studies have reported the nature of recorded lung function data and what variations to expect in stable versus unstable patients.

Aims: To evaluate the nature of individual diurnal, day-to-day and long-term variation in important prognostic markers of COPD exacerbations in a heterogeneous patient group by employing a newly developed TH system.

Methods: Eight women and five men with COPD performed measurements (FEV1, IC, SpO2 and CAT) three times per week during 4-6 months using the TH system. Feasibility was based on the repeatability and quality of the FEV1 and IC measurements, as defined by ERS/ATS guidelines. Short-term and long-term individual variations were assessed using the relative density and mean (SD) respectively.

Results: Close to 1100 FEV1 and IC measurements respectively were performed during a total of 240 patient weeks. The 2SD ranges for intra-individual variation were ± 210 mL and ± 350 mL for FEV1 and IC respectively. The values both increased and decreased without corresponding influence on symptoms (CAT) or SpO2 and no exacerbation was reported. However, it was unusual with a decrease of more than 50 mL per measurement in FEV1 between three consecutive measurement days.

Conclusions: This study reveals important and, to our knowledge, previously not reported information about short and long-term variability in lung function measurements in stable patients with COPD, of significance when defining criteria for detecting exacerbations with TH systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society, 2018
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155993 (URN)10.1183/13993003.congress-2018.PA3828 (DOI)000455567104471 ()
Conference
28th International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), SEP 15-19, 2018, Paris, FRANCE
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Tistad, M., Lundell, S., Wiklund, M., Nyberg, A., Holmner, Å. & Wadell, K. (2018). Usefulness and relevance of an eHealth Tool in supporting the self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: explorative qualitative study of a cocreative process. JMIR Human Factors, 5(4), Article ID e10801.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Usefulness and relevance of an eHealth Tool in supporting the self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: explorative qualitative study of a cocreative process
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2018 (English)In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e10801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: New strategies are urgently needed to support self-management for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care. The use of electronic health (eHealth) solutions is promising. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how such eHealth tools should be designed in order to be perceived as relevant and useful and meet the needs and expectations of the health professionals as well as people with COPD and their relatives.

Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the aspects of an eHealth tool design and content that make it relevant and useful for supporting COPD-related self-management strategies from the perspective of health care professionals, people with COPD and their relatives, and external researchers.

Methods: Data were collected during the development of an eHealth tool. A cocreation process was carried out with participants from two primary care units in northern Sweden and external researchers. Individual interviews were performed with health care professionals (n=13) as well as people with COPD (n=6) and their relatives (n=2), and focus group discussions (n=9) were held with all groups of participants. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The overarching theme, reinforcing existing support structures, reflects participant views that the eHealth tool needs to be directly applicable and create a sense of commitment in users. Moreover, participants felt that the tool needs to fit with existing routines and contexts and preferably should not challenge existing hierarchies between health care professionals and people with COPD. Important content for health care professionals and people with COPD included knowledge about self-management strategies. Videos were regarded as the most effective method for communicating such knowledge.

Conclusions: The cocreation in the development process enables participant perspectives and priorities to be built into the eHealth tool. This is assumed to contribute to a tool that is useful and relevant and, therefore, adopted into clinical practice and everyday life. Findings from this study can inform the development of eHealth tools for people with COPD in other contexts, as well as the development of eHealth tools for self-management support of other chronic diseases.

Keywords
COPD, eHealth, cocreation, self-management, primary care, chronic disease, user involvement, KOL, eHälsa, egenvård, primärvård, kroniska sjukdomar, samskapande, användarsamverkan
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Lung Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152605 (URN)10.2196/10801 (DOI)30368440 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22572-01-4Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20130331
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved
Lundell, S., Tistad, M., Rehn, B., Wiklund, M., Holmner, Å. & Wadell, K. (2017). Building COPD care on shaky ground: a mixed methods study from Swedish primary care professional perspective. BMC Health Services Research, 17, Article ID 467.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building COPD care on shaky ground: a mixed methods study from Swedish primary care professional perspective
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2017 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, article id 467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a public health problem. Interprofessional collaboration and health promotion interventions such as exercise training, education, and behaviour change are cost effective, have a good effect on health status, and are recommended in COPD treatment guidelines. There is a gap between the guidelines and the healthcare available to people with COPD. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of what shapes the provision of primary care services to people with COPD and what healthcare is offered to them from the perspective of healthcare professionals and managers.

Methods: The study was conducted in primary care in a Swedish county council during January to June 2015. A qualitatively driven mixed methods design was applied. Qualitative and quantitative findings were merged into a joint analysis. Interviews for the qualitative component were performed with healthcare professionals (n = 14) from two primary care centres and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Two questionnaires were used for the quantitative component; one was answered by senior managers or COPD nurses at primary care centres (n = 26) in the county council and the other was answered by healthcare professionals (n = 18) at two primary care centres. The questionnaire data were analysed with descriptive statistics.

Results: The analysis gave rise to the overarching theme building COPD care on shaky ground. This represents professionals driven to build a supportive COPD care on 'shaky' organisational ground in a fragmented and non-compliant healthcare organisation. The shaky ground is further represented by uninformed patients with a complex disease, which is surrounded with shame. The professionals are autonomous and pragmatic, used to taking responsibility for their work, and with limited involvement of the management. They wish to provide high quality COPD care with interprofessional collaboration, but they lack competence and are hindered by inadequate routines and lack of resources.

Conclusions: There is a gap between COPD treatment guidelines and the healthcare that is provided in primary care. To facilitate implementation of the guidelines several actions are needed, such as further training for professionals, additional resources, and improved organisational structure for interprofessional collaboration and patient education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Primary care, Healthcare professionals, Mixed methods, Healthcare system, Organisation, Implementation, Health promotion, Treatment guidelines, Sweden
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137946 (URN)10.1186/s12913-017-2393-y (DOI)000405243000001 ()
Available from: 2017-08-02 Created: 2017-08-02 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Bay, A., Sandberg, C., Thilen, U., Wadell, K. & Johansson, B. (2017). Exercise self-efficacy (ESE) in adults with congential heart disease. Paper presented at European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2017, 26-30 August, Barcelona, Spain. European Heart Journal, 38(Suppl. 1), Article ID ehx501.P618.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise self-efficacy (ESE) in adults with congential heart disease
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2017 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no Suppl. 1, article id ehx501.P618Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Many adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have reduced aerobic exercise capacity and impaired muscle function. However, it is largely unknown which factors have influence on the confidence to perform exercise training, i.e. Exercise Self-Efficacy (ESE).

Aims: To identify factors related to low ESE, and thus identify potential targets for rehabilitation and thereby enhance the potential for being physically active.

Methods: Seventy-nine adults with CHD; simple lesions n=38 (women n=16), complex lesions n=41 (women n=17) (mean age 36.7±14.6 years) and 42 age and sex matched controls were recruited. All participants completed questionnaires on ESE, quality of life (EQ-5D), and physical activity (international physical activity questionnaire, IPAQ), and performed muscle endurance tests.

Results: ESE was categorised into low (<26 points, n=24) and high (≥26 points, n=55). Patients with low ESE were older (45.2±15.4 vs. 32.6±12.5 years, p=0.002), more often had prescribed medication (67% vs. 44%, p=0.06), higher New York Heart Association functional class (NYHA) (≥ III) (25% vs. 7%, p=0.03) and performed fewer shoulder flexions (30.9±16.1 vs. 45.9±23.9, p=0.01) compared with those with high ESE. In the high ESE group, ESE did not differ from controls (33.8±3.9 vs. 33.4±6.1, p=0.74). In linear multivariate analysis age (B;-0.18, 95% CI -0.28- -0.08), smoking (B;-3.73, 95% CI -7.17- -0.28), EQ-5Dindex <1 (B;-3.33, 95% CI -6.08- -0.57) and number of shoulder flexions (B; 0.09, 95% CI 0.03–0.16) were independently associated with ESE.

Conclusion: Many adults with CHD have low ESE. Rehabilitation targeting quality of life, smoking cessation and muscle training may improve ESE, and thus enhance the potential for being physically active in this population.

Keywords
heart diseases, exercise, adult, self efficacy
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156919 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehx501.P618 (DOI)
Conference
European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2017, 26-30 August, Barcelona, Spain
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
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