umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Waldenström, Anders
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Hagström, L., Henein, M. Y., Karp, K., Waldenström, A. & Lindqvist, P. (2017). Impact of age and sex on normal left heart structure and function. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 37(6), 759-766
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of age and sex on normal left heart structure and function
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 759-766Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Accurate age- and sex-related normal reference values of ventricular structure and function are important to determine the level of dysfunction in patients. The aim of this study therefore was to document normal age range sex-related measurements of LV structural and functional measurements to serve such purpose.

METHODS: We evaluated left ventricular structure and function in 293 healthy subjects between 20 and 90 years with equally distributed gender. Doppler echocardiography was used including measure of both systolic and diastolic functions.

RESULTS: Due to systolic LV function, only long axis function correlated with age (r = 0·55, P<0·01) and the correlation was stronger in females. Concerning diastolic function, there was a strong age correlation in all parameters used (r = 0·40-0·74, P<0·001). Due to LV structural changes over age, females showed a larger reduction in end-diastolic volumes, but no or trivial difference in wall thickness after the age of 60 years.

CONCLUSION: Age is associated with significant normal changes in left ventricular structure and function, which should be considered when deciding on normality. These changes are related to systemic arterial changes as well as body stature, thus reflecting overall body ageing process. Furthermore, normal cardiac ageing in females might partly explain the higher prevalence of heart failure with preserved ejection in females.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
age, cardiac function, sex
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122375 (URN)10.1111/cpf.12371 (DOI)000413678400030 ()27283123 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Svennerholm, K., Rodsand, P., Hellman, U., Waldenström, A., Lundholm, M., Ahrén, D., . . . Haney, M. (2016). DNA content in extracellular vesicles isolated from porcine coronary venous blood directly after myocardial ischemic preconditioning. PLoS ONE, 11(7), Article ID e0159105.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DNA content in extracellular vesicles isolated from porcine coronary venous blood directly after myocardial ischemic preconditioning
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0159105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Extracellular vesicles (EV) are nano-sized membranous structures released from most cells. They have the capacity to carry bioactive molecules and gene expression signals between cells, thus mediating intercellular communication. It is believed that EV confer protection after ischemic preconditioning (IPC). We hypothesize that myocardial ischemic preconditioning will lead to rapid alteration of EV DNA content in EV collected from coronary venous effluent.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a porcine myocardial ischemic preconditioning model, EV were isolated from coronary venous blood before and after IPC by differential centrifugation steps culminating in preparative ultracentrifugation combined with density gradient ultracentrifugation. The EV preparation was validated, the DNA was extracted and further characterized by DNA sequencing followed by bioinformatics analysis.

RESULTS: Porcine genomic DNA fragments representing each chromosome, including mitochondrial DNA sequences, were detected in EV isolated before and after IPC. There was no difference detected in the number of sequenced gene fragments (reads) or in the genomic coverage of the sequenced DNA fragments in EV isolated before and after IPC. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of genes coding for ion channels, enzymes and proteins for basal metabolism and vesicle biogenesis and specific cardiac proteins.

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that porcine EV isolated from coronary venous blood plasma contain fragments of DNA from the entire genome, including the mitochondria. In this model we did not find specific qualitative or quantitative changes of the DNA content in EV collected immediately after an in vivo myocardial IPC provocation. This does not rule out the possibility that EV DNA content changes in response to myocardial IPC which could occur in a later time frame.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Libray Science, 2016
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124283 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0159105 (DOI)000380169600033 ()27434143 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-08-01 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Haas, J., Frese, K. S., Peil, B., Kloos, W., Keller, A., Nietsch, R., . . . Meder, B. (2015). Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy. European Heart Journal, 36(18), 1123-U43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 18, p. 1123-U43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: We were able to show that targeted Next-Generation Sequencing is well suited to be applied in clinical routine diagnostics, substantiating the ongoing paradigm shift from low- to high-throughput genomics in medicine. By means of our atlas of the genetics of human DCM, we aspire to soon be able to apply our findings to the individual patient with cardiomyopathy in daily clinical practice. Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome these limitations and screened all DCM disease genes in a large cohort. Methods and results: In this multi-centre, multi-national study, we have enrolled 639 patients with sporadic or familial DCM. To all samples, we applied a standardized protocol for ultra-high coverage next-generation sequencing of 84 genes, leading to 99.1% coverage of the target region with at least 50-fold and a mean read depth of 2415. In this well characterized cohort, we find the highest number of known cardiomyopathy mutations in plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein C-3, and desmoplakin. When we include yet unknown but predicted disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations is considerably high. Of note, we find that >38% of patients have compound or combined mutations and 12.8% have three or even more mutations. When comparing patients recruited in the eight participating European countries we find remarkably little differences in mutation frequencies and affected genes. Conclusion: This is to our knowledge, the first study that comprehensively investigated the genetics of DCM in a large-scale cohort and across a broad gene panel of the known DCM genes. Our results underline the high analytical quality and feasibility of Next-Generation Sequencing in clinical genetic diagnostics and provide a sound database of the genetic causes of DCM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015
Keywords
cardiomyopathy, genetics, patients, diagnosis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105259 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehu301 (DOI)000354742800015 ()25163546 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kayvanpour, E., Haas, J., Sedaghat-Hamedani, F., Waldenström, A., Monserrat, L., Charron, P. H., . . . Katus, H. A. (2015). Genetic cardiomyopathy overlaps can modify phenotypic features in dilated cardiomyopathy patients - a comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS) study. European Heart Journal, 36, 953-954
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic cardiomyopathy overlaps can modify phenotypic features in dilated cardiomyopathy patients - a comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS) study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, p. 953-954Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110581 (URN)000361205106385 ()
Note

Supplement: 1 Meeting Abstract: P5472

Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Svennerholm, K., Rodsand, P., Hellman, U., Lundholm, M., Waldenström, A., Biber, B., . . . Haney, M. (2015). Myocardial ischemic preconditioning in a porcine model leads to rapid changes in cardiac extracellular vesicle messenger RNA content. International Journal of Cardiology Heart and Vasculature, 8, 62-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myocardial ischemic preconditioning in a porcine model leads to rapid changes in cardiac extracellular vesicle messenger RNA content
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology Heart and Vasculature, ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 8, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are thought to exert protective effects after ischemic and remote ischemic preconditioning. It is not well understood which EV content factors are most relevant for protective effects. We hypothesize that ischemic preconditioning leads to qualitative changes in EV mRNA content and quantitative changes in EV size and number.

Methods: Using an in vivo porcine ischemic preconditioning model, EVs were collected from coronary venous blood, and isolated by differential ultracentrifugations. The presence and purity of EV were verified by electron microscopy and Western blot, and EV number was assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis. The mRNA EV was identified by microarray.

Results: Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment of EV mRNA coding for proteins associated with regulation of transcription, translation, extracellular matrix, morphogenic development and feeding behavior. There were 11,678 different mRNA transcripts detected in EV, where a total of 1103 was significantly increased or decreased after preconditioning, of which 638 mRNA sequences were up-regulated and/or emerged due to preconditioning. Several of them have known association with ischemic preconditioning. There was no significant difference in EV quantity or size before and after preconditioning.

Conclusions: These findings demonstrate in an in vivo model that myocardial ischemic preconditioning influences the composition of mRNA in EV, including gene transcripts for proteins associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The finding that preconditioned parental cells release EV containing mRNA that is qualitatively different from those released by non-preconditioned cells shows the importance of the external milieu on parental cell EV production.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
extracellular vesicles, mRNA, transcription, ischemic preconditioning, myocardium
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Cardiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111217 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcha.2015.05.006 (DOI)000218809300013 ()28785681 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bergström, G., Berglund, G., Blomberg, A., Brandberg, J., Engström, G., Engvall, J., . . . Rosengren, A. (2015). The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design.. Journal of Internal Medicine, 278(6), 645-659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design.
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120485 (URN)10.1111/joim.12384 (DOI)000375425100001 ()26096600 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kreiner, M., Alvarez, R., Waldenström, A., Michelis, V., Muñiz, R. & Isberg, A. (2014). Craniofacial pain of cardiac origin is associated with inferior wall ischemia. Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, 28(4), 317-321
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Craniofacial pain of cardiac origin is associated with inferior wall ischemia
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 317-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To investigate possible associations between the presence of craniofacial pain of cardiac origin and the location of cardiac ischemia and conventional risk factors. Methods: A total of 326 consecutive patients with confirmed myocardial ischemia (192 males, 134 females, mean age 64 years) were studied. Demographic details, health history, risk factors, prodromal symptoms, electrocardiogram (ECG) findings, and pain characteristics during the ischemic episode were assessed. The location of the ischemia according to the ECG findings was categorized as anterior, inferior, or lateral. Univariate chi-square analyses and a multivariate logistic regression model were used for data analysis. Two age subgroups (< 65 and > 65) were established when controlling for covariates. Results: Craniofacial pain of cardiac origin was significantly associated with an inferior localization of cardiac ischemia (P < .001) and was more frequently reported in diabetic patients (P = .014). Thirty-eight patients (12%) did not experience chest pain during the myocardial ischemia. Nine patients (3%) experienced a prodromal angina episode without chest pain. Conclusion: The occurrence of craniofacial pain during myocardial ischemia, with or without an acute myocardial infarction, was associated with ischemia within the inferior wall. This result suggests the involvement of the vagal afferent system in the mechanisms of craniofacial pain of cardiac origin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence Publishing, 2014
Keywords
acute myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia, chest pain, cranio facial pain, dental pain
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97266 (URN)000344838900004 ()
Available from: 2014-12-12 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waldenström, A. & Ronquist, G. (2014). Role of Exosomes in Myocardial Remodeling. Circulation Research, 114(2), 315-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of Exosomes in Myocardial Remodeling
2014 (English)In: Circulation Research, ISSN 0009-7330, E-ISSN 1524-4571, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 315-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exosomes are nanovesicles released from cells through exocytosis and are known to be mediators of proximal as well as distant cell-to-cell signaling. They are surrounded by a classical bilayered membrane with an exceptionally high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. Exosomes were first described in 1977, then named prostasomes, and in 1987 the name exosome was coined. Exosomes contain surface proteins, some of which can act as labels in order to find their target cells. Exosomes also contain messages in the form of proteins and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) that are transferable to target cells. Little is known and written about cardiac exosomes, although Gupta and Knowlton described exosomes containing HSP60 in 2007. It is now known that exosomes from cardiomyocytes can transfect other cells and that the metabolic milieu of the parental cell decides the quality of exosomes released such that they induce differential gene expression in transfected cells. Future clinical use of exosomes in diagnosis, monitoring disease progress, and treatment is promising.

Keywords
biogenesis, myocytes, cardiac, nucleic acids, transfection
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90467 (URN)10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.114.300584 (DOI)000335587100019 ()
Available from: 2014-07-07 Created: 2014-06-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Henein, M., Waldenström, A., Mörner, S. & Lindqvist, P. (2014). The normal impact of age and gender on right heart structure and function. Echocardiography, 31(1), 5-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The normal impact of age and gender on right heart structure and function
2014 (English)In: Echocardiography, ISSN 0742-2822, E-ISSN 1540-8175, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: As the proportion of elderly population increases rapidly, it might be difficult to differentiate physiological changes in cardiac function due to age from the pathophysiological ones. In addition, cardiac function variations with gender are well established. The right ventricular (RV) plays an important role in the overall cardiac function, but reference values varying with age and gender are lacking.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 255 healthy individuals from a general population register, mean age of 58 ± 19 (range 22-89) years, 125 were females. We used 2D and M-mode echocardiography to measure RV inflow tract (RVIT) and RV outflow tract (RVOT) dimensions and fractional shortening (fs). Spectral Doppler echocardiography was also used.

RESULTS: We found a modest decrease in RVIT dimensions (P < 0.05), but increase in RVOT dimensions with advancing age (P < 0.05). A small decrease in RVOT fs with age was also found (P < 0.05). Estimated pulmonary pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance increased (P < 0.001) as did RVOT wall thickness (P < 0.001), but RV diastolic function was not altered (P < 0.001) with age. Despite correction for the BSA, males showed larger RVIT dimensions (P < 0.001 for both), but RVOT end-diastolic dimension was larger in females (P < 0.05). RVIT and RVOT fractional shortening were increased in females (P < 0.01 for both).

CONCLUSION: In a cohort of normal individuals, age has significant impact on RV structure and function, inlet area falls and outflow tract dimensions increase and fractional shortening also increase in females. In addition, RVOT wall thickness significantly increases and Doppler markers of pulmonary vascular resistance show a consistent rise. The age-related changes should carefully be considered when commenting on normality and when using absolute values.

Keywords
right heart function, age, gender
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79932 (URN)10.1111/echo.12289 (DOI)000329197100026 ()23822635 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-04 Created: 2013-09-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ronquist, G., Lötvall, J., Gabrielsson, S., Mincheva-Nilsson, L., Svanvik, J., Telemo, E. & Waldenström, A. (2013). Exosomen: intercellulär signalbärare med framtidspotential. Kan ge nya diagnostiska och terapeutiska möjligheter.. Läkartidningen, 110(46), 2050-2052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exosomen: intercellulär signalbärare med framtidspotential. Kan ge nya diagnostiska och terapeutiska möjligheter.
Show others...
2013 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 46, p. 2050-2052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Läkartidningen förlag AB, 2013
Keywords
biogenesis, myocytes, cardiac, nucleic acids, transfection
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107996 (URN)24380158 (PubMedID)
Note

Titel på engelska:

Exosomes: intercellular signal carriers with a future potential. May provide new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications