umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gardeström, Per
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Law, S. R., Chrobok, D., Juvany, M., Delhomme, N., Lindén, P., Brouwer, B., . . . Keech, O. (2018). Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival. Plant Physiology, 177(1), 132-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In plants, an individually darkened leaf initiates senescence much more rapidly than a leaf from a whole darkened plant. Combining transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we present an overview of the metabolic strategies that are employed in response to different darkening treatments. Under darkened plant conditions, the perception of carbon starvation drove a profound metabolic readjustment in which branched-chain amino acids and potentially monosaccharides released from cell wall loosening became important substrates for maintaining minimal ATP production. Concomitantly, the increased accumulation of amino acids with a high nitrogen-carbon ratio may provide a safety mechanism for the storage of metabolically derived cytotoxic ammonium and a pool of nitrogen for use upon returning to typical growth conditions. Conversely, in individually darkened leaf, the metabolic profiling that followed our 13C-enrichment assays revealed a temporal and differential exchange of metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, between the darkened leaf and the rest of the plant. This active transport could be the basis for a progressive metabolic shift in the substrates fueling mitochondrial activities, which are central to the catabolic reactions facilitating the retrieval of nutrients from the senescing leaf. We propose a model illustrating the specific metabolic strategies employed by leaves in response to these two darkening treatments, which support either rapid senescence or a strong capacity for survival.

Keywords
Arabidopsis thaliana, senescence, metabolism, dark induced senescence, survival
National Category
Botany
Research subject
biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147675 (URN)10.1104/pp.18.00062 (DOI)000431347500015 ()29523713 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Podgorska, A., Ostaszewska-Bugajska, M., Tarnowska, A., Burian, M., Borysiuk, K., Gardeström, P. & Szal, B. (2018). Nitrogen Source Dependent Changes in Central Sugar Metabolism Maintain Cell Wall Assembly in Mitochondrial Complex I-Defective frostbite1 and Secondarily Affect Programmed Cell Death. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(8), Article ID 2206.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nitrogen Source Dependent Changes in Central Sugar Metabolism Maintain Cell Wall Assembly in Mitochondrial Complex I-Defective frostbite1 and Secondarily Affect Programmed Cell Death
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 8, article id 2206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For optimal plant growth, carbon and nitrogen availability needs to be tightly coordinated. Mitochondrial perturbations related to a defect in complex I in the Arabidopsis thalianafrostbite1 (fro1) mutant, carrying a point mutation in the 8-kD Fe-S subunit of NDUFS4 protein, alter aspects of fundamental carbon metabolism, which is manifested as stunted growth. During nitrate nutrition, fro1 plants showed a dominant sugar flux toward nitrogen assimilation and energy production, whereas cellulose integration in the cell wall was restricted. However, when cultured on NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source, which typically induces developmental disorders in plants (i.e., the ammonium toxicity syndrome), fro1 showed improved growth as compared to NO3- nourishing. Higher energy availability in fro1 plants was correlated with restored cell wall assembly during NH4+ growth. To determine the relationship between mitochondrial complex I disassembly and cell wall-related processes, aspects of cell wall integrity and sugar and reactive oxygen species signaling were analyzed in fro1 plants. The responses of fro1 plants to NH4+ treatment were consistent with the inhibition of a form of programmed cell death. Resistance of fro1 plants to NH4+ toxicity coincided with an absence of necrotic lesion in plant leaves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
cell wall synthesis, complex I defect, frostbite1, mitochondrial mutant, NDUFS4, necrosis, sugar tabolism, sugar signaling, programmed cell death, reactive oxygen species
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152417 (URN)10.3390/ijms19082206 (DOI)000442869800058 ()30060552 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Keech, O., Gardeström, P., Kleczkowski, L. A. & Rouhier, N. (2017). The redox control of photorespiration: from biochemical and physiological aspects to biotechnological considerations. Plant, Cell and Environment, 40(4), 553-569
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The redox control of photorespiration: from biochemical and physiological aspects to biotechnological considerations
2017 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 553-569Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Photorespiration is a complex and tightly regulated process occurring in photosynthetic organisms. This process can alter the cellular redox balance, notably via the production and consumption of both reducing and oxidizing equivalents. Under certain circumstances, these equivalents, as well as reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, can become prominent in subcellular compartments involved in the photorespiratory process, eventually promoting oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins. Keeping these changes under tight control should therefore be of primary importance. In order to review the current state of knowledge about the redox control of photorespiration, we primarily performed a careful description of the known and potential redox-regulated or oxidation sensitive photorespiratory proteins, and examined in more details two interesting cases: the glycerate kinase and the glycine cleavage system. When possible, the potential impact and subsequent physiological regulations associated with these changes have been discussed. In a second part, we reviewed the extent to which photorespiration contributes to cellular redox homeostasis considering, in particular, the set of peripheral enzymes associated with the canonical photorespiratory pathway. Finally, some recent biotechnological strategies to circumvent photorespiration for future growth improvements are discussed in the light of these redox regulations.

Keywords
cysteine, photorespiration, post-translational regulation, redox proteomics, reducing equivalent
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118759 (URN)10.1111/pce.12713 (DOI)000397504400009 ()26791824 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-04 Created: 2016-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Chrobok, D., Law, S. R., Brouwer, B., Linden, P., Ziolkowska, A., Liebsch, D., . . . Keech, O. (2016). Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence. Plant Physiology, 172(4), 2132-2153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 4, p. 2132-2153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is conserved until the latest stages of leaf senescence, while their number drops by 30%. Adenylate phosphorylation state assays and mitochondrial respiratory measurements indicated that the leaf energy status also is maintained during this time period. Furthermore, after establishing a curated list of genes coding for products targeted to mitochondria, we analyzed in isolation their transcript profiles, focusing on several key mitochondrial functions, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial electron transfer chain, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, transporters, as well as catabolic pathways. In tandem with a metabolomic approach, our data indicated that mitochondrial metabolism was reorganized to support the selective catabolism of both amino acids and fatty acids. Such adjustments would ensure the replenishment of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate, which provide the carbon backbones for nitrogen remobilization. Glutamate, being the substrate of the strongly up-regulated cytosolic glutamine synthase, is likely to become a metabolically limiting factor in the latest stages of developmental leaf senescence. Finally, an evolutionary age analysis revealed that, while branched-chain amino acid and proline catabolism are very old mitochondrial functions particularly enriched at the latest stages of leaf senescence, auxin metabolism appears to be rather newly acquired. In summation, our work shows that, during developmental leaf senescence, mitochondria orchestrate catabolic processes by becoming increasingly central energy and metabolic hubs.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131100 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.01463 (DOI)000391173400006 ()27744300 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindén, P., Keech, O., Stenlund, H., Gardeström, P. & Moritz, T. (2016). Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling. Journal of Experimental Botany, 67(10), 3123-3135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 3123-3135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions.

Keywords
Heavy isotope labelling, mass spectrometry, mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, photorespiration, primary carbon metabolism, redox balance
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118760 (URN)10.1093/jxb/erw030 (DOI)000376658300019 ()26889011 (PubMedID)
Note

Special issue: Photorespiration: Origins and Metabolic Integration in Interacting Compartments

Available from: 2016-04-04 Created: 2016-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Gardeström, P. & Igamberdiev, A. U. (2016). The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 157(3), 367-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells
2016 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 157, no 3, p. 367-379Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In photosynthetically active cells, both chloroplasts and mitochondria have the capacity to produce ATP via photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Thus, theoretically, both organelles could provide ATP for the cytosol, but the extent, to which they actually do this, and how the process is regulated, both remain unclear. Most of the evidence discussed comes from experiments with rapid fractionation of isolated protoplasts subjected to different treatments in combination with application of specific inhibitors. The results obtained indicate that, under conditions where ATP demand for photosynthetic CO2 fixation is sufficiently high, the mitochondria supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. In contrast, under stress conditions where CO2 fixation is severely limited, ATP will build up in chloroplasts and it can then be exported to the cytosol, by metabolite shuttle mechanisms. Thus, depending on the conditions, either mitochondria or chloroplasts can supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. This supply of ATP is discussed in relation to the idea that mitochondrial functions may be tuned to provide an optimal environment for the chloroplast. By balancing cellular redox states, mitochondria can contribute to an optimal photosynthetic capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
National Category
Cell Biology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124251 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12455 (DOI)000379260400010 ()27087668 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kunz, S., Gardeström, P., Pesquet, E. & Kleczkowski, L. (2015). Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis. Frontiers in Plant Science, 6, Article ID 525.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 6, article id 525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (bZIP63, At5g22920, BT2, MGD2, and TPS9) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardly impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/transporting proteins (adg1, sex1, sus1-4, sus5/6, and tpt2), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—gin2.1 and oe3.2, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying pbZIP63::GUS showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced pbZIP63::GUS repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown gin2.1 and oe3.2 seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in oe3.2 plants for bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Overall, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression.

Keywords
glucose sensing, hexokinase, BT2 expression, bZIP63 expression, At5g22920 expression, diurnal regulation of expression, sugar regulation of gene expression
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Botany
Research subject
Physiological Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96578 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2015.00525 (DOI)000358589400001 ()26236323 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form with the title: The metabolic activity of HEXOKINASE 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920 and BT2 in Arabidopsis

Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Podgorska, A., Ostaszewska, M., Gardeström, P., Rasmusson, A. G. & Szal, B. (2015). In comparison with nitrate nutrition, ammonium nutrition increases growth of the frostbite1 Arabidopsis mutant. Plant, Cell and Environment, 38(1), 224-237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In comparison with nitrate nutrition, ammonium nutrition increases growth of the frostbite1 Arabidopsis mutant
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 224-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ammonium nutrition inhibits the growth of many plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. The toxicity of ammonium is associated with changes in the cellular redox state. The cellular oxidant/antioxidant balance is controlled by mitochondrial electron transport chain. In this study, we analysed the redox metabolism of frostbite1 (fro1) plants, which lack mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I. Surprisingly, the growth of fro1 plants increased under ammonium nutrition. Ammonium nutrition increased the reduction level of pyridine nucleotides in the leaves of wild-type plants, but not in the leaves of fro1 mutant plants. The observed higher activities of type II NADH dehydrogenases and cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial electron transport chain may improve the energy metabolism of fro1 plants grown on ammonium. Additionally, the observed changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism in the apoplast may be important for determining the growth of fro1 under ammonium nutrition. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses showed that the gene expression changes in fro1 plants significantly overlap with the changes previously observed in plants with a modified apoplastic pH. Overall, the results suggest a pronounced connection between the mitochondrial redox system and the apoplastic pH and ROS levels, which may modify cell wall plasticity and influence growth. In this paper, we analysed the redox metabolism of frostbite1 (fro1) plants lacking Complex I under ammonium nutrition. We showed that, although ammonium leads to stress in wild type plants, ammonium does not cause reductive stress in fro1 plants. Our experimental and bioinformatic analyses indicated that mtETC dysfunction strongly influences apoplastic reactive oxygen species content and pH, and suggested that the faster growth of fro1 plants under ammonium nutrition probably results from modification of the cell wall.

Keywords
ammonium syndrome, apoplast, apoplastic pH, complex I, dysfunction of mtETC, mitochondria, redox meostasis, respiration
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-99219 (URN)10.1111/pce.12404 (DOI)000346429800019 ()
Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-02-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Igamberdiev, A. U., Lernmark, U. & Gardeström, P. (2014). Activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in plants is stimulated in the presence of malate. Mitochondrion (Amsterdam. Print), 19(Part B), 184-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in plants is stimulated in the presence of malate
2014 (English)In: Mitochondrion (Amsterdam. Print), ISSN 1567-7249, E-ISSN 1872-8278, Vol. 19, no Part B, p. 184-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of malate on the steady-state activity of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L) leaf pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) has been studied in isolated mitochondria. The addition of malate was found to be stimulatory for the mitochondrial PDC, however there was no stimulation of chloroplast PDC. The stimulation was saturated below 1 mM malate and was apparently related to a partially activated complex, which activity increased in the presence of malate by about twofold. Malate also reversed the reduction of PDC activity in the presence of glycine. Based on the obtained kinetic data, we suggest that the effect of malate is rather not a direct activation of PDC but involves the establishment of NAD-malate dehydrogenase equilibrium, decreasing concentration of NADH and relieving its inhibitory effect of PDC. 

Keywords
Glycine, Malate dehydrogenase, Photorespiration, Plant mitochondria, Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex
National Category
Cell Biology Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-99233 (URN)10.1016/j.mito.2014.04.006 (DOI)000346624800008 ()
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-02-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Brouwer, B., Gardeström, P. & Keech, O. (2014). In response to partial plant shading, the lack of phytochrome A does not directly induce leaf senescence but alters the fine-tuning of chlorophyll biosynthesis. Journal of Experimental Botany, 65(14), 4037-4049
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In response to partial plant shading, the lack of phytochrome A does not directly induce leaf senescence but alters the fine-tuning of chlorophyll biosynthesis
2014 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 65, no 14, p. 4037-4049Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytochrome is thought to control the induction of leaf senescence directly, however, the signalling and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, an ecophysiological approach was used to establish a functional connection between phytochrome signalling and the physiological processes underlying the induction of leaf senescence in response to shade. With shade it is important to distinguish between complete and partial shading, during which either the whole or only a part of the plant is shaded, respectively. It is first shown here that, while PHYB is required to maintain chlorophyll content in a completely shaded plant, only PHYA is involved in maintaining the leaf chlorophyll content in response to partial plant shading. Second, it is shown that leaf yellowing associated with strong partial shading in phyA-mutant plants actually correlates to a decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll rather than to an increase of its degradation. Third, it is shown that the physiological impact of this decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll in strongly shaded phyA-mutant leaves is accompanied by a decreased capacity to adjust the Light Compensation Point. However, the increased leaf yellowing in phyA-mutant plants is not accompanied by an increase of senescence-specific molecular markers, which argues against a direct role of PHYA in inducing leaf senescence in response to partial shade. In conclusion, it is proposed that PHYA, but not PHYB, is essential for fine-tuning the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway in response to partial shading. In turn, this mechanism allows the shaded leaf to adjust its photosynthetic machinery to very low irradiances, thus maintaining a positive carbon balance and repressing the induction of leaf senescence, which can occur under prolonged periods of shade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2014
Keywords
Arabidopsis, chlorophyll, far-red light, phytochrome, senescence, shade
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92956 (URN)10.1093/jxb/eru060 (DOI)000339954000020 ()
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications