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Moen, Jon
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Publications (10 of 67) Show all publications
Jonsson, M., Bengtsson, J., Gamfeldt, L., Moen, J. & Snäll, T. (2019). Levels of forest ecosystem services depend on specific mixtures of commercial tree species. Nature Plants, 5(2), 141-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of forest ecosystem services depend on specific mixtures of commercial tree species
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2019 (English)In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 141-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global and local ecosystem change resulting in diversity loss has motivated efforts to understand relationships between species diversity and ecosystem services. However, it is unclear how such a general understanding can inform policies for the management of ecosystem services in production systems, because these systems are primarily used for food or fibre, and are rarely managed for the conservation of species diversity. Here, using data from a nationwide forest inventory covering an area of 230,000 km2, we show that relative abundances of commercial tree species in mixed stands strongly influence the potential to provide ecosystem services. The mixes provided higher levels of ecosystem services compared to respective plant monocultures (overyielding or transgressive overyielding) in 35% of the investigated cases, and lower (underyielding) in 9% of the cases. We further show that relative abundances, not just species richness per se, of specific tree-species mixtures affect the potential of forests to provide multiple ecosystem services, which is crucial information for policy and sustainable forest management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Forest Science Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162512 (URN)10.1038/s41477-018-0346-z (DOI)000460479600011 ()30664731 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Uboni, A., Blochel, A., Kodnik, D. & Moen, J. (2019). Modelling occurrence and status of mat-forming lichens in boreal forests to assess the past and current quality of reindeer winter pastures. Ecological Indicators, 96, 99-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling occurrence and status of mat-forming lichens in boreal forests to assess the past and current quality of reindeer winter pastures
2019 (English)In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 96, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lichens play an essential role in northern ecosystems as important contributors to the water, nutrient and carbon cycles, as well as the main winter food resource for reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, also called caribou in North America), the most abundant herbivores in arctic and subarctic regions. Today, climate change and several types of land use are rapidly transforming northern ecosystems and challenging lichen growth. Since lichens are important indicators of ecosystem health and habitat suitability for reindeer, large-scale assessments are needed to estimate their past, present and future status. In our study, we aimed to develop models and equations that can be used by stakeholders to identify the occurrence of lichen-dominated boreal forests and to determine lichen conditions in those forests. Data were collected in Sweden and most input data are publicly available. We focused on mat-forming lichens belonging to the genera Cladonia and Cetraria, which are dominant species in the reindeer and caribou winter diet. Our models described lichen-dominated forests as being dominated by Scots pine (Pines sylvestris), having low basal area and thin canopy cover, and being located in south-and west-facing areas with high summer precipitation, low winter precipitation and temperature, and on gentle slopes. Within those forests, lichen biomass was positively related to tree canopy cover and summer precipitation, while negatively and exponentially related to intensity of use of the area by reindeer. Forest, meteorological, topographic and soil data can be used as input in our models to determine lichen conditions without having to estimate lichen biomass through demanding and expensive fieldwork.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Caribou, Ground lichen, Lichen growth, Lichen volume, Reindeer forage, Reindeer husbandry, Terricolous lichen
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158606 (URN)10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.08.008 (DOI)000464889600010 ()
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Hilding-Rydevik, T., Moen, J. & Green, C. (2017). Baselines and the shifting baseline syndrome: exploring frames of reference in nature conservation. In: Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin (Ed.), Crumley, CL Lennartsson, T Westin, A (Ed.), Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions (pp. 112-141). Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Baselines and the shifting baseline syndrome: exploring frames of reference in nature conservation
2017 (English)In: Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions / [ed] Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin, Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 112-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157803 (URN)10.1017/9781108355780.005 (DOI)000461066400005 ()2-s2.0-85047383965 (Scopus ID)9781108355780 (ISBN)9781108420983 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Lennartsson, T., Eriksson, O., Iuga, A., Larsson, J., Moen, J., Scholl, M. D., . . . Crumley, C. L. (2017). Diversity in ecological and social contexts. In: Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin (Ed.), Crumley, CL Lennartsson, T Westin, A; NTLEY JW, 1987, ANNUAL REVIEW OF ANTHROPOLOGY, V16, P31 rstkotte Tim, 2014, HUMAN ECOLOGY, V42, P671 rsson Jesper, 2014, HISTORY OF THE FAMILY, V19, P393 tlund L, 1997, CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FOREST RESEARCH-REVUE CANADIENNE DE RECHERCHE (Ed.), Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions (pp. 182-239). Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversity in ecological and social contexts
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2017 (English)In: Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions / [ed] Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin, Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 182-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157802 (URN)10.1017/9781108355780.007 (DOI)000461066400007 ()2-s2.0-85047417761 (Scopus ID)9781108355780 (ISBN)9781108420983 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Sinclair, P., Moen, J. & Crumley, C. L. (2017). Historical ecology and the longue durée. In: Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin (Ed.), Crumley, CL Lennartsson, T Westin, A (Ed.), Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions (pp. 13-40). Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical ecology and the longue durée
2017 (English)In: Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions / [ed] Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin, Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 13-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157798 (URN)10.1017/9781108355780.002 (DOI)000461066400002 ()2-s2.0-85047397783 (Scopus ID)9781108355780 (ISBN)9781108420983 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Jones, E. A., Westin, A., Madry, S., Murray, S., Moen, J. & Tickner, A. (2017). How to operationalise collaborative research. In: Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin (Ed.), Crumley, CL Lennartsson, T Westin, A (Ed.), Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions (pp. 240-271). Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to operationalise collaborative research
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2017 (English)In: Issues and concepts in historical ecology: the past and future of landscapes and regions / [ed] Carole L. Crumley, Tommy Lennartsson, Anna Westin, Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 240-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157797 (URN)10.1017/9781108355780.008 (DOI)000461066400008 ()2-s2.0-85047432291 (Scopus ID)9781108355780 (ISBN)9781108420983 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Linkowski, W. A., Kvarnstrom, M., Westin, A., Moen, J. & Ostlund, L. (2017). Wolf and Bear Depredation on Livestock in Northern Sweden 1827-2014: Combining History, Ecology and Interviews. Land, 6(3), Article ID 63.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wolf and Bear Depredation on Livestock in Northern Sweden 1827-2014: Combining History, Ecology and Interviews
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2017 (English)In: Land, ISSN 2073-445X, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the twenty-first century, large carnivores have increased in human dominated landscapes after being extinct or nearly extinct. This has resulted in increasing numbers of livestock killed by large carnivores. The intent of this paper is to give a land use-historical perspective on the recent livestock-carnivore conflict in boreal Sweden. More specifically we address: (1) depredation risks (livestock killed by carnivores) and (2) local knowledge of how to protect livestock from predation and whether it survived among pastoralists until the present. This study provides numeric information on carnivores, livestock and depredation, combined with oral information from summer farmers about livestock protection. We compare recent (since 1998) and historical (late nineteenth century) depredation rates in two Swedish counties. In Dalarna recent depredation rates are higher than historical rates while the opposite pattern is seen in Jamtland. Recent depredation rates in Dalarna are twice the recent rates in Jamtland, in contrast to the historical situation. Recent and historical depredation rates are of the same order. Summer farmers traditionally graze their livestock in forested areas where carnivores reside. Interviews show that traditional knowledge of how to protect livestock from carnivores was lost during the twentieth century, but recently new knowledge has developed leading to changes in summer farming practices. The carnivore-livestock situation today differs from the historical situation, not so much in levels of depredation, but mainly regarding the possibilities of farmers to face challenges associated with increasing carnivore populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2017
Keywords
carnivores, livestock depredation, wolves, bears, traditional knowledge, summer farms
National Category
Fish and Wildlife Management Physical Geography History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140916 (URN)10.3390/land6030063 (DOI)000411997300019 ()
Available from: 2017-10-31 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Maes, J., Liquete, C., Teller, A., Erhard, M., Paracchini, M. L., Barredo, J. I., . . . Lavalle, C. (2016). An indicator framework for assessing ecosystem services in support of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020. Ecosystem Services, 17, 14-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An indicator framework for assessing ecosystem services in support of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020
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2016 (English)In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 17, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the EU, the mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services, abbreviated to MAES, is seen as a key action for the advancement of biodiversity objectives, and also to inform the development and implementation of related policies on water, climate, agriculture, forest, marine and regional planning. In this study, we present the development of an analytical framework which ensures that consistent approaches are used throughout the EU. It is framed by a broad set of key policy questions and structured around a conceptual framework that links human societies and their well-being with the environment. Next, this framework is tested through four thematic pilot studies, including stakeholders and experts working at different scales and governance levels, which contributed indicators to assess the state of ecosystem services. Indicators were scored according to different criteria and assorted per ecosystem type and ecosystem services using the common international classification of ecosystem services (CICES) as typology. We concluded that there is potential to develop a first EU wide ecosystem assessment on the basis of existing data if they are combined in a creative way. However, substantial data gaps remain to be filled before a fully integrated and complete ecosystem assessment can be carried out.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
EU Biodiversity Strategy, CICES, Indicators, MAES, Natural Capital
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118257 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.10.023 (DOI)000370641300004 ()
Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mårald, E., Langston, N., Sténs, A. & Moen, J. (2016). Changing ideas in forestry: A comparison of concepts in Swedish and American forestry journals during the early twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Ambio, 45, 74-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing ideas in forestry: A comparison of concepts in Swedish and American forestry journals during the early twentieth and twenty-first centuries
2016 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By combining digital humanities text-mining tools and a qualitative approach, we examine changing concepts in forestry journals in Sweden and the United States (US) in the early twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Our first hypothesis is that foresters at the beginning of the twentieth century were more concerned with production and less concerned with ecology than foresters at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Our second hypothesis is that US foresters in the early twentieth century were less concerned with local site conditions than Swedish foresters. We find that early foresters in both countries had broader—and often ecologically focused—concerns than hypothesized. Ecological concerns in the forestry literature have increased, but in the Nordic countries, production concerns have increased as well. In both regions and both time periods, timber management is closely connected to concerns about governance and state power, but the forms that governance takes have changed.

Keywords
Ecology, Forestry concepts, Governance, History, Sweden, The United States
National Category
History Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
biology, Environmental Science; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-115209 (URN)10.1007/s13280-015-0744-7 (DOI)000372300000002 ()26744044 (PubMedID)
Projects
Future Forests
Note

Supplement: 2

Available from: 2016-02-01 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Uboni, A., Horstkotte, T., Kaarlejärvi, E., Seveque, A., Stammler, F., Olofsson, J., . . . Moen, J. (2016). Long-Term Trends and Role of Climate in the Population Dynamics of Eurasian Reindeer. PLoS ONE, 11(6), Article ID e0158359.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Trends and Role of Climate in the Population Dynamics of Eurasian Reindeer
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0158359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temperature is increasing in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions at a higher rate than anywhere else in the world. The frequency and nature of precipitation events are also predicted to change in the future. These changes in climate are expected, together with increasing human pressures, to have significant impacts on Arctic and sub-Arctic species and ecosystems. Due to the key role that reindeer play in those ecosystems, it is essential to understand how climate will affect the region's most important species. Our study assesses the role of climate on the dynamics of fourteen Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) populations, using for the first time data on reindeer abundance collected over a 70-year period, including both wild and semi-domesticated reindeer, and covering more than half of the species' total range. We analyzed trends in population dynamics, investigated synchrony among population growth rates, and assessed the effects of climate on population growth rates. Trends in the population dynamics were remarkably heterogeneous. Synchrony was apparent only among some populations and was not correlated with distance among population ranges. Proxies of climate variability mostly failed to explain population growth rates and synchrony. For both wild and semi-domesticated populations, local weather, biotic pressures, loss of habitat and human disturbances appear to have been more important drivers of reindeer population dynamics than climate. In semi-domesticated populations, management strategies may have masked the effects of climate. Conservation efforts should aim to mitigate human disturbances, which could exacerbate the potentially negative effects of climate change on reindeer populations in the future. Special protection and support should be granted to those semi-domesticated populations that suffered the most because of the collapse of the Soviet Union, in order to protect the livelihood of indigenous peoples that depend on the species, and the multi-faceted role that reindeer exert in Arctic ecosystems.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124235 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0158359 (DOI)000378865200063 ()
Available from: 2016-07-28 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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