umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hernell, Olle
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 201) Show all publications
Lindquist, S., Alenius, G.-M., Berntson, L., Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S., Lundberg, L., Wang, Y. & Hernell, O. (2019). A novel target for treatment of inflammatory joint diseases. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78, 1525-1526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel target for treatment of inflammatory joint diseases
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, p. 1525-1526Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is a hitherto unrecognized player in inflammation. Animals devoid of BSSL (knockout mice) are protected from developing collagen induced arthritis (CIA) and collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA), and antibodies directed towards BSSL has been proven to prevent or mitigate arthritis in mouse and rat arthritis models1. In humans, BSSL is present in blood2 and accumulate at sites of inflammation. Patients with acute pancreatitis have significantly increased plasma BSSL levels compared to healthy controls. Whether BSSL in blood originates from pancreas, inflammatory cells, or both remains to be elucidated.

Objectives: To determine BSSL concentration in blood samples from patients with inflammatory joint disorders and to evaluate possible relationships between circulating BSSL levels and disease-activity variables.

Methods: BSSL concentrations in plasma or serum were determined in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis arthritis (PsA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between BSSL concentrations and disease activity score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), S100A8/9, leukocyte- and neutrophil counts, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed using Spearman rank-order correlation.

Results: Significant correlations between BSSL concentration in plasma and disease activity score (DAS28, rS=0.31, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.58, p<0.000), CRP (rS=0.42, p=0.012), leukocytes (rS=0.66, p<0.000), and neutrophils (rS=0.71, p<0.000) were found in RA. The BSSL plasma concentration decreased with duration of treatment with the TNFα inhibitor infliximab, in parallel with decreasing DAS28 score.

BSSL concentration was significantly higher in sera from PsA patients with both oligo- and polyarthritis compared with healthy controls. Moreover, BSSL concentration in serum correlated significantly with S100A8/A9 and CRP concentrations (rS=0.54, p<0.001 and rS=0.49, p<0.001, respectively). No correlation between levels of BSSL and cytokines or chemokines were found in RA or PsA plasma or serum, respectively.

In JIA, levels of BSSL in serum correlated significantly with JIA disease activity score (JADAS27) (rS=0.26, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.47, p<0.000), and leukocytes (rS=0.32, p<0.000).

Conclusion: BSSL concentration in serum and plasma correlated with disease activity in patients with inflammatory joint disorders, i.e. RA, PsA and JIA. These data in humans support the relevance of our previous studies in rodents and therefore also our hypothesis 1 that BSSL is a novel target for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161720 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2165 (DOI)000472207104460 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
He, X., Parenti, M., Grip, T., Lönnerdal, B., Timby, N., Domellöf, M., . . . Slupsky, C. M. (2019). Fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed bovine MFGM supplemented formula or standard formula with breast-fed infants as reference: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 11589.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed bovine MFGM supplemented formula or standard formula with breast-fed infants as reference: a randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human milk delivers an array of bioactive components that safeguard infant growth and development and maintain healthy gut microbiota. Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biologically functional fraction of milk increasingly linked to beneficial outcomes in infants through protection from pathogens, modulation of the immune system and improved neurodevelopment. In the present study, we characterized the fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed a bovine MFGM supplemented experimental formula (EF) and compared to infants fed standard formula (SF) and a breast-fed reference group. The impact of MFGM on the fecal microbiome was moderate; however, the fecal metabolome of EF-fed infants showed a significant reduction of several metabolites including lactate, succinate, amino acids and their derivatives from that of infants fed SF. Introduction of weaning food with either human milk or infant formula reduces the distinct characteristics of breast-fed- or formula-fed-like infant fecal microbiome and metabolome profiles. Our findings support the hypothesis that higher levels of protein in infant formula and the lack of human milk oligosaccharides promote a shift toward amino acid fermentation in the gut. MFGM may play a role in shaping gut microbial activity and function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162856 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-47953-4 (DOI)000480384500005 ()31406230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Li, X., Peng, Y., Li, Z., Christensen, B., Heckmanns, A. B., Stenlund, H., . . . Hernell, O. (2019). Feeding Infants Formula With Probiotics or Milk Fat Globule Membrane: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. Frontiers in Pediatrics, 7, Article ID 347.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeding Infants Formula With Probiotics or Milk Fat Globule Membrane: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 7, article id 347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate effects on growth and infection rates of supplementing infant formula with the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei strain F19 (F19) or bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM).

Methods: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 infants were randomized to a formula supplemented with F19 or MFGM, or to standard formula (SF). A breastfed group was recruited as reference (n = 200).The intervention lasted from age 21 ± 7 days until 4 months, and infants were followed until age one year.

Results: Both experimental formulas were well tolerated and resulted in high compliance. The few reported adverse events were not likely related to formula, with the highest rates in the SF group, significantly higher than for the F19-supplemented infants (p = 0.046). Weight or length gain did not differ during or after the intervention among the formula-fed groups, with satisfactory growth. During the intervention, overall, the experimental formula groups did not have more episodes of diarrhea, fever, or days with fever than the breastfed infants. However, compared to the breastfed infants, the SF group had more fever episodes (p = 0.021) and days with fever (p = 0.036), but not diarrhea. Compared with the breastfed group, the F19-supplemented infants but not the other two formula groups had more visits/unscheduled hospitalizations (p = 0.015) and borderline more episodes of upper respiratory tract infections (p = 0.048).

Conclusions: Both the MFGM- and F19-supplemented formulas were safe and well-tolerated, leading to few adverse effects, similar to the breastfed group and unlike the SF group. During the intervention, the MFGM-supplemented infants did not differ from the breastfed infants in any primary outcome.

Keywords
infant, breastfed, MFGM, F19, infection, safety, probiotics
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163060 (URN)10.3389/fped.2019.00347 (DOI)000482056600002 ()31552203 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
He, X., Parenti, M., Grip, T., Domellöf, M., Lonnerdal, B., Hernell, O., . . . Slupsky, C. M. (2019). Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Formula-fed (FF) infants exhibit a different metabolic profile than breast-fed (BF) infants. Two potential mechanisms are the higher protein level in formula compared with breast milk and the removal of the milk fat and associated milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) during production of infant formula. To determine whether MFGM may impact metabolism, formula-fed infants were randomly assigned to receive either an MFGM isolate-supplemented experimental formula (EF) or a standard formula (SF) from 2 until 6 months and compared with a BF reference group. Infants consuming EF had higher levels of fatty acid oxidation products compared to infants consuming SF. Although the protein level in the study formula was approximately 12 g/L (lower than most commercial formulas), a metabolic difference between FF and BF remained such that FF infants had higher levels of amino acid catabolism by-products and a low efficiency of amino acid clearance (preference for protein metabolism). BF infants had higher levels of fatty acid oxidation products (preference for fat metabolism). These unique, energy substrate-driven metabolic outcomes did not persist after diet was shifted to weaning foods and appeared to be disrupted by complementary feeding. Our results suggest that MFGM may have a role in directing infant metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156312 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36292-5 (DOI)000456392400020 ()30674917 (PubMedID)
Note

Publisher Correction: 

He, Xuan, Mariana Parenti, Tove Grip, Magnus Domellöf, Bo Lönnerdal, Olle Hernell, Niklas Timby, och Carolyn M. Slupsky. ”Publisher Correction: Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial”. Scientific Reports 9, nr 1 (22 augusti 2019): 12382. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48858-y.

Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, U., Öhlund, I., Hernell, O., Lönnerdal, B., Lindberg, L. & Lind, T. (2019). Protein-Reduced Complementary Foods Based on Nordic Ingredients Combined with Systematic Introduction of Taste Portions Increase Intake of Fruits and Vegetables in 9 Month Old Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients, 11(6), Article ID 1255.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein-Reduced Complementary Foods Based on Nordic Ingredients Combined with Systematic Introduction of Taste Portions Increase Intake of Fruits and Vegetables in 9 Month Old Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fruits and vegetables are healthy foods but under-consumed among infants and children. Approaches to increase their intake are urgently needed. This study investigated the effects of a systematic introduction of taste portions and a novel protein-reduced complementary diet based on Nordic foods on fruit and vegetable intake, growth and iron status to 9 months of age. Healthy, term infants (n = 250) were recruited and randomly allocated to either a Nordic diet group (NG) or a conventional diet group (CG). Infants were solely breast- or formula-fed at study start. From 4 to 6 months of age, the NG followed a systematic taste portions schedule consisting of home-made purées of Nordic produce for 24 days. Subsequently, the NG was supplied with baby food products and recipes of homemade baby foods based on Nordic ingredients but with reduced protein content compared to the CG. The CG was advised to follow current Swedish recommendations on complementary foods. A total of 232 participants (93%) completed the study. The NG had significantly higher intake of fruits and vegetables than the CG at 9 months of age; 225 ± 109 g/day vs. 156 ± 77 g/day (p < 0.001), respectively. Energy intake was similar, but protein intake was significantly lower in the NG (−26%, p < 0.001) compared to the CG. This lower protein intake was compensated for by higher intake of carbohydrate from fruits and vegetables. No significant group differences in growth or iron status were observed. The intervention resulted in significantly higher consumption of fruits and vegetables in infants introduced to complementary foods based on Nordic ingredients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
infant feeding, Nordic diet, eating behaviour, repeated exposure
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161926 (URN)10.3390/nu11061255 (DOI)000474936700061 ()31159495 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067185540 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Lind, T., Johansson, U., Öhlund, I., Lindberg, L., Lonnerdal, B., Tennefors, C. & Hernell, O. (2019). Study protocol: optimized complementary feeding study (OTIS): a randomized controlled trial of the impact of a protein-reduced complementary diet based on Nordic foods. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 134.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Study protocol: optimized complementary feeding study (OTIS): a randomized controlled trial of the impact of a protein-reduced complementary diet based on Nordic foods
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: What we eat as infants and children carries long-term consequences. Apart from breastfeeding, the composition of the complementary diet, i.e. the foods given to the infant during the transition from breast milk/infant formula to regular family foods affects the child's future health. A high intake of protein, a low intake of fruits, vegetables and fish and an unfavorable distribution between polyunsaturated and saturated fats are considered to be associate with health risks, e.g. obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia later in life.

Methods: In a randomized, controlled study from 6 to 18months of age we will compare the currently recommended, Swedish complementary diet to one based on Nordic foods, i.e. an increased intake of fruits, berries, vegetables, tubers, whole-grain and game, and a lower intake of sweets, dairy, meat and poultry, with lower protein content (30% decrease), a higher intake of vegetable fats and fish and a systematic introduction of fruits and greens. The main outcomes are body composition (fat and fat-free mass measured with deuterium), metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers (associated with the amount of body fat) in blood and urine, gut microbiota (thought to be the link between early diet, metabolism and diseases such as obesity and insulin resistance) and blood pressure.We will also measure the participants' energy and nutrient intake, eating behavior and temperament through validated questionnaires, acceptance of new and unfamiliar foods through video-taped test meals and assessment of cognitive development, which we believe can be influenced through an increased intake of fish and milk fats, notably milk fat globule membranes (MFGM).

Discussion: If the results are what we expect, i.e. improved body composition and a less obesogenic, diabetogenic and inflammatory metabolism and gut microbiota composition, a more sustainable nutrient intake for future health and an increased acceptance of healthy foods, they will have a profound impact on the dietary recommendations to infants in Sweden and elsewhere, their eating habits later in life and subsequently their long-term health.

Trial registration: NCT02634749. Registration date 18 December 2015.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Infant food, Child nutrition physiology, Body composition, Growth, Obesity, Insulin resistance, Hypertension, Child development, Microbiota, Feeding behavior, Food preference
National Category
Pediatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162772 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6466-1 (DOI)000457471800007 ()30704429 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Simonyté Sjödin, K., Hammarström, M.-L., Rydén, P., Sjödin, A., Hernell, O., Engstrand, L. & West, C. E. (2019). Temporal and long-term gut microbiota variation in allergic disease: a prospective study from infancy to school age. Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 74(1), 176-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal and long-term gut microbiota variation in allergic disease: a prospective study from infancy to school age
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 176-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Compositional changes in the early‐life gut microbiota have been implicated in IgE‐associated allergic diseases, but there is lack of longitudinal studies. We examined gut microbiota development from infancy to school age in relation to onset of IgE‐associated allergic diseases. At 8 years of age, we also examined the relationship between gut microbiota and T‐cell regulation, estimated as responses to polyclonal T‐cell activation.

Methods: Stool samples were collected from 93 children at 4, 6, 13 months, and 8 years of age. The gut microbiota was profiled using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Peripheral blood was drawn from all children, and mononuclear cells were polyclonally activated. Levels of IL‐10 and FOXP3 mRNA copies were determined using real‐time quantitative reverse transcriptase‐PCR.

Results: At 8 years of age, 21 children were diagnosed with IgE‐associated allergic disease and 90% displayed allergic comorbidity. Seventy‐two children were nonallergic and nonsensitized. Statistical tests with multiple testing corrections demonstrated temporal underrepresentation of Ruminococcus and consistent underrepresentation of Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Coprococcus in allergic compared to nonallergic children from infancy to school age. The gut microbiota of the allergic 8‐year‐olds was enriched in Bifidobacteriumand depleted of Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, and Lachnospira. In allergic 8‐year-olds, Faecalibacterium correlated with IL‐10 mRNA levels (rs = 0.49, Padj = 0.02) with the same trend for FOXP3 (rs = 0.39, Padj = 0.08).

Conclusions: We identified both temporal and long‐term variation in the differential abundance of specific bacterial genera in children developing IgE‐associated allergic disease. Improved dietary interventions aiming at expanding immune‐modulatory taxa could be studied for prevention of allergic disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
allergy, diversity, intestinal colonization, microbiome, T-cell response
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157612 (URN)10.1111/all.13485 (DOI)000459664100017 ()29786876 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-27 Created: 2019-03-27 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Hernell, O., Aggett, P., Fewtrell, M., Koletzko, B. & Rey, J. (2018). Chapter 7. The Contributions of the ESPGHAN Committees on Nutrition to Paediatric Nutrition. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 66, S144-S153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chapter 7. The Contributions of the ESPGHAN Committees on Nutrition to Paediatric Nutrition
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 66, p. S144-S153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The first Committee on Nutrition (CoN) was founded in 1974. Two years later nutrition (N) was added to the society's name, which then became ESPGAN. The Committee systematised compositional and quality criteria for breast milk substitutes and food for special medical purposes, the first of many examples on how recommendations and comments published by the Committees on Nutrition (CsoN) were adopted by the European Economic Community, later the European Union and also influenced the World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Codex standards. A second CoN focusing on preterm infants was established in 1979 and its recommendations on nutrition of these infants were widely implemented. The third and standing CoN, established 1986, started to organise high-quality symposia at the annual meetings appreciating the need to enhance the expertise in nutritional research. From 1991 the CoN has organised Summer Schools in paediatric nutrition for young colleagues further emphasising its educational interest and more recently an annual, more specialised Nutrition Masterclass. Successively the interest of the CoN has expanded to other areas, such as highlighting dilemmas and uncertainties in the field of nutrition including the design, choice of outcomes and statistical analysis of trials in infant nutrition. The work of the CsoN have had great impact on paediatric nutrition and the committee will continue its important role by writing commentaries and systematic reviews and revising guidelines when required to inform and stimulate discussion among colleagues as well as stimulate training in paediatric nutrition by organising workshops and scientific meetings, training courses, and other approaches, and by interaction with other expert groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
children, feeding practice, infants, nutrition
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147331 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000001918 (DOI)000429442500029 ()29596188 (PubMedID)
Note

Supplement: 1

Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lee, H., Padhi, E., Hasegawa, Y., Larke, J., Parenti, M., Wang, A., . . . Slupsky, C. (2018). Compositional dynamics of the milk fat globule and its role in infant development. Frontiers in Pediatrics, 6, Article ID 313.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compositional dynamics of the milk fat globule and its role in infant development
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 6, article id 313Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human milk is uniquely optimized for the needs of the developing infant. Its composition is complex and dynamic, driven primarily by maternal genetics, and to a lesser extent by diet and environment. One important component that is gaining attention is the milk fat globule (MFG). The MFG is composed of a triglyceride-rich core surrounded by a tri-layer membrane, also known as the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) that originates from mammary gland epithelia. The MFGM is enriched with glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, cholesterol, and proteins, some of which are glycosylated, and are known to exert numerous biological roles. Mounting evidence suggests that the structure of the MFG and bioactive components of the MFGM may benefit the infant by aiding in the structural and functional maturation of the gut through the provision of essential nutrients and/or regulating various cellular events during infant growth and immune education. Further, antimicrobial peptides and surface carbohydrate moieties surrounding the MFG might have a pivotal role in shaping gut microbial populations, which in turn may promote protection against immune and inflammatory diseases early in life. This review seeks to: (1) understand the components of the MFG, as well as maternal factors including genetic and lifestyle factors that influence its characteristics; (2) examine the potential role of this milk component on the intestinal immune system; and (3) delineate the mechanistic roles of the MFG in infant intestinal maturation and establishment of the microbiota in the alimentary canal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
milk fat globule, milk fat globule membrane, infant development, gut maturation, microbiota, immune system
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153702 (URN)10.3389/fped.2018.00313 (DOI)000448124200001 ()
Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Grip, T., Dyrlund, T. S., Ahonen, L., Domellöf, M., Hernell, O., Hyötyläinen, T., . . . Timby, N. (2018). Serum, plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipidomes in infants fed formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes. Pediatric Research, 84(5), 726-732
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum, plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipidomes in infants fed formula supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 726-732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Supplementation of formula with bovine milk fat globule membranes has been shown to narrow the gap in immunological and cognitive development between breast-fed and formula-fed infants.

METHOD: In a double-blinded randomized controlled trial 160 formula-fed infants received an experimental formula (EF), supplemented with bovine milk fat globule membranes, or standard formula until 6 months of age. A breast-fed reference group was recruited. Lipidomic analyses were performed on plasma and erythrocyte membranes at 6 months and on serum at 4 and 12 months of age.

RESULTS: At 6 months of age, we observed a significant separation in the plasma lipidome between the two formula groups, mostly due to differences in concentrations of sphingomyelins (SM), phosphatidylcholines (PC), and ceramides, and in the erythrocyte membrane lipidome, mostly due to SMs, PEs and PCs. Already at 4 months, a separation in the serum lipidome was evident where SMs and PCs contributed. The separation was not detected at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS: The effect of MFGM supplementation on the lipidome is likely part of the mechanisms behind the positive cognitive and immunological effects of feeding the EF previously reported in the same study population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155120 (URN)10.1038/s41390-018-0130-9 (DOI)000453019100031 ()30120403 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County CouncilVINNOVA
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications