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Hernell, Olle
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Publications (10 of 207) Show all publications
McClorry, S., Slupsky, C. M., Lind, T., Akeson, P. K., Hernell, O. & Öhlund, I. (2020). Effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in Swedish children may be negatively impacted by BMI and serum fructose. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 75, Article ID 108251.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in Swedish children may be negatively impacted by BMI and serum fructose
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, ISSN 0955-2863, E-ISSN 1873-4847, Vol. 75, article id 108251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In regions where sunlight exposure is limited, dietary vitamin D intake becomes important for maintaining status. However, Swedish children have been shown to have deficient or marginal status during the winter months even if the recommended dietary intake is met. Since low vitamin D status has been associated with several disease states, this study investigated the metabolic changes associated with improved vitamin D status due to supplementation.

During the 3 winter months, 5-7-year-old children (n=170) in northern (limed, 63 degrees N) and southern (Malmo, 55 degrees N) Sweden were supplemented daily with 2 (placebo), 10 or 25 mu g of vitamin D. BMI-for-age z-scores (BAZ), S-25(OH)D concentrations, insulin concentrations and the serum metabolome were assessed at baseline and follow-up.

S-25(OH)D concentrations increased significantly in both supplementation groups (P<.001). Only arginine and isopropanol concentrations exhibited significant associations with improvements in S-25(OH)D. Furthermore, the extent to which S-25(OH)D increased was correlated with a combination of baseline BAZ and the change in serum fructose concentrations from baseline to follow up (P=.012). In particular, the change in S-25(OH)D concentrations was negatively correlated (P=.030) with the change in fructose concentrations for subjects with BAZ >= 0 and consuming at least 20 mu g vitamin D daily. These results suggest that although the metabolic changes associated with improved vitamin D status are small, the effectiveness of dietary supplementation may be influenced by serum fructose concentrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
25-Hydroxy-vitamin D, Fructose, Metabolomics, Children, H-1 NMR
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167351 (URN)10.1016/j.jnutbio.2019.108251 (DOI)000504801200003 ()31707286 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-04 Created: 2020-02-04 Last updated: 2020-02-04Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Domellöf, M., Hernell, O., Lönnerdal, B., Nihlen, C., Johansson, I. & Weitzberg, E. (2020). Effects of age, sex and diet on salivary nitrate and nitrite in infants. Nitric oxide, 94, 73-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of age, sex and diet on salivary nitrate and nitrite in infants
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2020 (English)In: Nitric oxide, ISSN 1089-8603, E-ISSN 1089-8611, Vol. 94, p. 73-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The inorganic anions nitrate and nitrite are oxidation products from endogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation and constituents in our diet. A nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway exists in which nitrate can be serially reduced to bioactive NO. The first step of this pathway occurs in the oral cavity where oral bacteria convert salivary nitrate to nitrite, whereafter nitrite is reduced to NO systemically by several enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. Data are scarce regarding salivary levels and oral conversion capacity of these anions in infants. We measured salivary nitrate and nitrate in infants at 4 and 12 months of age and related values to age, sex, dietary pattern and oral microbiome. Saliva was collected from a total of 188 infants at 4 and 12 months of age. Salivary nitrate, nitrite and nitrite/nitrate ratio as a measure of oral nitrate-reducing capacity were analyzed by HPLC and related to age, sex, type of diet (breast milk or formula) and oral microbiome. There was no difference in salivary nitrate, nitrite or nitrite/nitrate ratio between boys and girls at any age. At 4 months levels of these parameters were lower than what has been described in adults but they had all increased significantly at 12 months of age. At 4 months of age salivary nitrite/nitrate ratio was lower in breast-fed compared to formula-fed infants, but these differences disappeared at 12 months. Several bacterial species were associated with oral nitrate reducing capacity including Prevotella, Veillonella, Alloprevotella and Leptotrichia. We conclude that in infants there is an increase in salivary nitrate and nitrite as well as in oral nitrate-reductase capacity during the first year of life. Differences observed at 4 months of age between breast-fed and formula-fed infants disappear at one year of age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Oral, Saliva, Bacteria, Nitric oxide, Nutrition, Formula
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168190 (URN)10.1016/j.niox.2019.10.012 (DOI)000508287900010 ()31682925 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-11 Created: 2020-03-11 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Koletzko, B., Bergmann, K., Brenna, J. T., Calder, P. C., Campoy, C., Clandinin, M. T., . . . Carlson, S. E. (2020). Should formula for infants provide arachidonic acid along with DHA?: A position paper of the European Academy of Paediatrics and the Child Health Foundation. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 111(1), 10-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Should formula for infants provide arachidonic acid along with DHA?: A position paper of the European Academy of Paediatrics and the Child Health Foundation
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2020 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently adopted regulatory standards on infant and follow-on formula for the European Union stipulate that from February 2020 onwards, all such products marketed in the European Union must contain 20-50 mg omega-3 DHA (22:6n-3) per 100 kcal, which is equivalent to about 0.5-1% of fatty acids (FAs) and thus higher than typically found in human milk and current infant formula products, without the need to also include co-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6). This novel concept of infant formula composition has given rise to concern and controversy because there is no accountable evidence on its suitability and safety in healthy infants. Therefore, international experts in the field of infant nutrition were invited to review the state of scientific research on DHA and AA, and to discuss the questions arising from the new European regulatory standards. Based on the available information, we recommend that infant and follow-on formula should provide both DHA and AA. The DHA should equal at least the mean content in human milk globally (0.3% of FAs) but preferably reach 0.5% of FAs. Although optimal AA intake amounts remain to be defined, we strongly recommend that AA should be provided along with DHA. At amounts of DHA in infant formula up to similar to 0.64%, AA contents should at least equal the DHA contents. Further well-designed clinical studies should evaluate the optimal intakes of DHA and AA in infants at different ages based on relevant outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2020
Keywords
infant nutrition, breast milk substitutes, long-chain PUFAs, European Commission Formula Delegated Act 2016/127, food safety
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167971 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqz252 (DOI)000505964300005 ()31665201 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Öhlund, I., Lind, T., Hernell, O., Silfverdal, S.-A., Liv, P. & Karlsland Åkeson, P. (2020). Vitamin D status and cardiometabolic risk markers in young Swedish children: a double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing different doses of vitamin D supplements. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 111(4), 779-786
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D status and cardiometabolic risk markers in young Swedish children: a double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing different doses of vitamin D supplements
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2020 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 779-786Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Observational studies have linked low vitamin D status to unfavorable cardiometabolic risk markers, but double-blinded vitamin D intervention studies in children are scarce.

Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different doses of a vitamin D supplement on cardiometabolic risk markers in young healthy Swedish children with fair and dark skin.

Methods: Cardiometabolic risk markers were analyzed as secondary outcomes of a double-blind, randomized, milk-based vitamin D intervention trial conducted during late fall and winter in 2 areas of Sweden (latitude 63°N and 55°N, respectively) in both fair- and dark-skinned 5- to 7-y-old children. During the 3-mo intervention, 206 children were randomly assigned to a daily milk-based vitamin D3 supplement of either 10 or 25 µg or placebo (2 µg; only at 55°N). Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apoA-I, apoB, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed and non–HDL cholesterol calculated at baseline and after the intervention.

Results: At baseline, serum 25(OH)D was negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (β = −0.194; 95% CI: −0.153, −0.013; and β = −0.187; 95% CI: −0.150, −0.011, respectively). At follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in any of the cardiometabolic markers between groups.

Conclusions: We could not confirm any effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum lipids, blood pressure, or CRP in healthy 5- to 7-y-old children. The study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01741324).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2020
Keywords
serum lipids, blood pressure, latitude, skin color, vitamin D supplement
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170399 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqaa031 (DOI)000525318600008 ()32140704 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-05-06 Created: 2020-05-06 Last updated: 2020-05-06Bibliographically approved
Lindquist, S., Alenius, G.-M., Berntson, L., Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S., Lundberg, L., Wang, Y. & Hernell, O. (2019). A novel target for treatment of inflammatory joint diseases. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78, 1525-1526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A novel target for treatment of inflammatory joint diseases
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2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, p. 1525-1526Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is a hitherto unrecognized player in inflammation. Animals devoid of BSSL (knockout mice) are protected from developing collagen induced arthritis (CIA) and collagen antibody induced arthritis (CAIA), and antibodies directed towards BSSL has been proven to prevent or mitigate arthritis in mouse and rat arthritis models1. In humans, BSSL is present in blood2 and accumulate at sites of inflammation. Patients with acute pancreatitis have significantly increased plasma BSSL levels compared to healthy controls. Whether BSSL in blood originates from pancreas, inflammatory cells, or both remains to be elucidated.

Objectives: To determine BSSL concentration in blood samples from patients with inflammatory joint disorders and to evaluate possible relationships between circulating BSSL levels and disease-activity variables.

Methods: BSSL concentrations in plasma or serum were determined in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis arthritis (PsA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between BSSL concentrations and disease activity score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), S100A8/9, leukocyte- and neutrophil counts, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed using Spearman rank-order correlation.

Results: Significant correlations between BSSL concentration in plasma and disease activity score (DAS28, rS=0.31, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.58, p<0.000), CRP (rS=0.42, p=0.012), leukocytes (rS=0.66, p<0.000), and neutrophils (rS=0.71, p<0.000) were found in RA. The BSSL plasma concentration decreased with duration of treatment with the TNFα inhibitor infliximab, in parallel with decreasing DAS28 score.

BSSL concentration was significantly higher in sera from PsA patients with both oligo- and polyarthritis compared with healthy controls. Moreover, BSSL concentration in serum correlated significantly with S100A8/A9 and CRP concentrations (rS=0.54, p<0.001 and rS=0.49, p<0.001, respectively). No correlation between levels of BSSL and cytokines or chemokines were found in RA or PsA plasma or serum, respectively.

In JIA, levels of BSSL in serum correlated significantly with JIA disease activity score (JADAS27) (rS=0.26, p=0.007), ESR (rS=0.47, p<0.000), and leukocytes (rS=0.32, p<0.000).

Conclusion: BSSL concentration in serum and plasma correlated with disease activity in patients with inflammatory joint disorders, i.e. RA, PsA and JIA. These data in humans support the relevance of our previous studies in rodents and therefore also our hypothesis 1 that BSSL is a novel target for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161720 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.2165 (DOI)000472207104460 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
Sjödin, K. S., Domellöf, M., Lagerqvist, C., Hernell, O., Lönnerdal, B., Szymlek-Gay, E. A., . . . Lind, T. (2019). Administration of ferrous sulfate drops has significant effects on the gut microbiota of iron-sufficient infants: a randomised controlled study [Letter to the editor]. Gut, 68(11)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Administration of ferrous sulfate drops has significant effects on the gut microbiota of iron-sufficient infants: a randomised controlled study
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2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 11Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167039 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316988 (DOI)000497817400023 ()30343273 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
He, X., Parenti, M., Grip, T., Lönnerdal, B., Timby, N., Domellöf, M., . . . Slupsky, C. M. (2019). Fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed bovine MFGM supplemented formula or standard formula with breast-fed infants as reference: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 11589.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed bovine MFGM supplemented formula or standard formula with breast-fed infants as reference: a randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human milk delivers an array of bioactive components that safeguard infant growth and development and maintain healthy gut microbiota. Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biologically functional fraction of milk increasingly linked to beneficial outcomes in infants through protection from pathogens, modulation of the immune system and improved neurodevelopment. In the present study, we characterized the fecal microbiome and metabolome of infants fed a bovine MFGM supplemented experimental formula (EF) and compared to infants fed standard formula (SF) and a breast-fed reference group. The impact of MFGM on the fecal microbiome was moderate; however, the fecal metabolome of EF-fed infants showed a significant reduction of several metabolites including lactate, succinate, amino acids and their derivatives from that of infants fed SF. Introduction of weaning food with either human milk or infant formula reduces the distinct characteristics of breast-fed- or formula-fed-like infant fecal microbiome and metabolome profiles. Our findings support the hypothesis that higher levels of protein in infant formula and the lack of human milk oligosaccharides promote a shift toward amino acid fermentation in the gut. MFGM may play a role in shaping gut microbial activity and function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162856 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-47953-4 (DOI)000480384500005 ()31406230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Li, X., Peng, Y., Li, Z., Christensen, B., Heckmanns, A. B., Stenlund, H., . . . Hernell, O. (2019). Feeding Infants Formula With Probiotics or Milk Fat Globule Membrane: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. Frontiers in Pediatrics, 7, Article ID 347.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeding Infants Formula With Probiotics or Milk Fat Globule Membrane: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 7, article id 347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate effects on growth and infection rates of supplementing infant formula with the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei strain F19 (F19) or bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM).

Methods: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 infants were randomized to a formula supplemented with F19 or MFGM, or to standard formula (SF). A breastfed group was recruited as reference (n = 200).The intervention lasted from age 21 ± 7 days until 4 months, and infants were followed until age one year.

Results: Both experimental formulas were well tolerated and resulted in high compliance. The few reported adverse events were not likely related to formula, with the highest rates in the SF group, significantly higher than for the F19-supplemented infants (p = 0.046). Weight or length gain did not differ during or after the intervention among the formula-fed groups, with satisfactory growth. During the intervention, overall, the experimental formula groups did not have more episodes of diarrhea, fever, or days with fever than the breastfed infants. However, compared to the breastfed infants, the SF group had more fever episodes (p = 0.021) and days with fever (p = 0.036), but not diarrhea. Compared with the breastfed group, the F19-supplemented infants but not the other two formula groups had more visits/unscheduled hospitalizations (p = 0.015) and borderline more episodes of upper respiratory tract infections (p = 0.048).

Conclusions: Both the MFGM- and F19-supplemented formulas were safe and well-tolerated, leading to few adverse effects, similar to the breastfed group and unlike the SF group. During the intervention, the MFGM-supplemented infants did not differ from the breastfed infants in any primary outcome.

Keywords
infant, breastfed, MFGM, F19, infection, safety, probiotics
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163060 (URN)10.3389/fped.2019.00347 (DOI)000482056600002 ()31552203 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
He, X., Parenti, M., Grip, T., Domellöf, M., Lonnerdal, B., Hernell, O., . . . Slupsky, C. M. (2019). Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Formula-fed (FF) infants exhibit a different metabolic profile than breast-fed (BF) infants. Two potential mechanisms are the higher protein level in formula compared with breast milk and the removal of the milk fat and associated milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) during production of infant formula. To determine whether MFGM may impact metabolism, formula-fed infants were randomly assigned to receive either an MFGM isolate-supplemented experimental formula (EF) or a standard formula (SF) from 2 until 6 months and compared with a BF reference group. Infants consuming EF had higher levels of fatty acid oxidation products compared to infants consuming SF. Although the protein level in the study formula was approximately 12 g/L (lower than most commercial formulas), a metabolic difference between FF and BF remained such that FF infants had higher levels of amino acid catabolism by-products and a low efficiency of amino acid clearance (preference for protein metabolism). BF infants had higher levels of fatty acid oxidation products (preference for fat metabolism). These unique, energy substrate-driven metabolic outcomes did not persist after diet was shifted to weaning foods and appeared to be disrupted by complementary feeding. Our results suggest that MFGM may have a role in directing infant metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156312 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36292-5 (DOI)000456392400020 ()30674917 (PubMedID)
Note

Publisher Correction: 

He, Xuan, Mariana Parenti, Tove Grip, Magnus Domellöf, Bo Lönnerdal, Olle Hernell, Niklas Timby, och Carolyn M. Slupsky. ”Publisher Correction: Metabolic phenotype of breast-fed infants, and infants fed standard formula or bovine MFGM supplemented formula: a randomized controlled trial”. Scientific Reports 9, nr 1 (22 augusti 2019): 12382. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48858-y.

Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Hernell, O., Domellöf, M., Grip, T., Lönnerdal, B. & Timby, N. (2019). Physiological Effects of Feeding Infants and Young Children Formula Supplemented with Milk Fat Globule Membranes. In: Donovan, Sharon M.; German, J. Bruce; Lönnerdal, Bo; Lucas, Alan (Ed.), Human Milk: Composition, Clinical Benefits and Future Opportunities. Paper presented at 90th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Lausanne, October-November 2017 (pp. 35-42). S. Karger
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiological Effects of Feeding Infants and Young Children Formula Supplemented with Milk Fat Globule Membranes
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2019 (English)In: Human Milk: Composition, Clinical Benefits and Future Opportunities / [ed] Donovan, Sharon M.; German, J. Bruce; Lönnerdal, Bo; Lucas, Alan, S. Karger, 2019, p. 35-42Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Dietary supplementation with bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) concentrates has recently emerged as a possible means to improve the health of infants and young children. Formula-fed infants are of special interest since infant formulas traditionally have lower concentrations of biologically active MFGM components than human milk. We identified 6 double-blind randomized controlled trials (DBRCT) exploring the effects of supplementing the diet of infants and children with bovine MFGM concentrates. Two studies found a positive effect on cognitive development in formula-fed infants. Three studies found a protective effect against infections at different ages during infancy and early childhood. We conclude that supplementation with MFGM during infancy and childhood appears safe, and the studies indicate positive effects on both neurodevelopment and defense against infections, especially in formula-fed infants. However, due to the small number of studies and the heterogeneity of interventions and outcomes, more high-quality DBRCTs are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn on the likely health benefits of MFGM supplementation to infants and children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
Series
Nestle Nutrition Institute Workshop Series, ISSN 1664-2147 ; 90
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167603 (URN)10.1159/000490291 (DOI)000506803500004 ()30865975 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062874124 (Scopus ID)
Conference
90th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Lausanne, October-November 2017
Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2020-03-02Bibliographically approved
Projects
Growth and development with infant formula [2009-00209_Vinnova]; Umeå University
Organisations

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