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Rowe, Owen F.
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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rowe, O. F., Figueroa, D., Kratzer, S. & Legrand, C. (2018). Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 204, 225-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary
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2018 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 204, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria are key groups at the base of aquatic food webs. In estuaries receiving riverine water with a high content of coloured allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM), phytoplankton primary production may be reduced, while bacterial production is favoured. We tested this hypothesis by performing a field study in a northerly estuary receiving nutrient-poor, ADOM-rich riverine water, and analyzing results using multivariate statistics. Throughout the productive season, and especially during the spring river flush, the production and growth rate of heterotrophic bacteria were stimulated by the riverine inflow of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In contrast, primary production and photosynthetic efficiency (i.e. phytoplankton growth rate) were negatively affected by DOC. Primary production related positively to phosphorus, which is the limiting nutrient in the area. In the upper estuary where DOC concentrations were the highest, the heterotrophic bacterial production constituted almost 100% of the basal production (sum of primary and bacterial production) during spring, while during summer the primary and bacterial production were approximately equal. Our study shows that riverine DOC had a strong negative influence on coastal phytoplankton production, likely due to light attenuation. On the other hand DOC showed a positive influence on bacterial production since it represents a supplementary food source. Thus, in boreal regions where climate change will cause increased river inflow to coastal waters, the balance between phytoplankton and bacterial production is likely to be changed, favouring bacteria. The pelagic food web structure and overall productivity will in turn be altered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Primary and bacterial production, Coastal areas, Estuary, Allochthonous dissolved organic matter, Northern Baltic Sea
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147287 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2018.02.032 (DOI)000429757300020 ()
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F., Dinasquet, J., Paczkowska, J., Figueroa, D., Riemann, L. & Andersson, A. (2018). Major differences in dissolved organic matter characteristics and bacterial processing over an extensive brackish water gradient, the Baltic Sea. Marine Chemistry, 202, 27-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Major differences in dissolved organic matter characteristics and bacterial processing over an extensive brackish water gradient, the Baltic Sea
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2018 (English)In: Marine Chemistry, ISSN 0304-4203, E-ISSN 1872-7581, Vol. 202, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine waters is a complex mixture of compounds and elements that contribute substantially to the global carbon cycle. The large reservoir of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represents a vital resource for heterotrophic bacteria. Bacteria can utilise, produce, recycle and transform components of the DOM pool, and the physicochemical characteristics of this pool can directly influence bacterial activity; with consequences for nutrient cycling and primary productivity. In the present study we explored bacterial transformation of naturally occurring DOM across an extensive brackish water gradient in the Baltic Sea. Highest DOC utilisation (indicated by decreased DOC concentration) was recorded in the more saline southerly region where waters are characterised by more autochthonous DOM. These sites expressed the lowest bacterial growth efficiency (BGE), whereas in northerly regions, characterised by higher terrestrial and allochthonous DOM, the DOC utilisation was low and BGE was highest. Bacterial processing of the DOM pool in the south resulted in larger molecular weight compounds and compounds associated with secondary terrestrial humic matter being degraded, and a processed DOM pool that was more aromatic in nature and contributed more strongly to water colour; while the opposite was true in the north. Nutrient concentration and stoichiometry and DOM characteristics affected bacterial activity, including metabolic status (BGE), which influenced DOM transformations. Our study highlights dramatic differences in DOM characteristics and microbial carbon cycling in sub-basins of the Baltic Sea. These findings are critical for our understanding of carbon and nutrient biogeochemistry, particularly in light of climate change scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Dissolved organic matter, DOC utilisation, DOM fluorescence, Bacterial growth efficiency, Bacterial oduction, Baltic Sea
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148733 (URN)10.1016/j.marchem.2018.01.010 (DOI)000432764600003 ()2-s2.0-85043466446 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Lindström, S., Rowe, O. F., Timonen, S., Sundström, L. & Johansson, H. (2018). Trends in bacterial and fungal communities in ant nests observed with Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques-validity and compatibility in ecological studies. PeerJ, 6, Article ID e5289.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in bacterial and fungal communities in ant nests observed with Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques-validity and compatibility in ecological studies
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2018 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e5289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbes are ubiquitous and often occur in functionally and taxonomically complex communities. Unveiling these community dynamics is one of the main challenges of microbial research. Combining a robust, cost effective and widely used method such as Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) with a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) method (Illumina MiSeq), offers a solid alternative for comprehensive assessment of microbial communities. Here, these two methods were combined in a study of complex bacterial and fungal communities in the nest mounds of the ant Formica exsecta, with the aim to assess the degree to which these methods can be used to complement each other. The results show that these methodologies capture similar spatiotemporal variations, as well as corresponding functional and taxonomical detail, of the microbial communities in a challenging medium consisting of soil, decomposing plant litter and an insect inhabitant. Both methods are suitable for the analysis of complex environmental microbial communities, but when combined, they complement each other well and can provide even more robust results. T-RFLP can be trusted to show similar general community patterns as Illumina MiSeq and remains a good option if resources for NGS methods are lacking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PeerJ Inc., 2018
Keywords
NGS, T-RFLP, Fungi, Bacteria, Ants, Formica exsecta, Illumina MiSeq, Spatiotemporal trends, Microbial communities
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150673 (URN)10.7717/peerj.5289 (DOI)000439652200010 ()30042898 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050278721 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Meunier, C. L., Liess, A., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rahman, H., . . . Rowe, O. F. (2017). Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web: a mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff. Marine Environmental Research, 129, 236-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web: a mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff
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2017 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 129, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change predictions indicate that coastal and estuarine environments will receive increased terrestrial runoff via increased river discharge. This discharge transports allochthonous material, containing bioavailable nutrients and light attenuating matter. Since light and nutrients are important drivers of basal production, their relative and absolute availability have important consequences for the base of the aquatic food web, with potential ramifications for higher trophic levels. Here, we investigated the effects of shifts in terrestrial organic matter and light availability on basal producers and their grazers. In twelve Baltic Sea mesocosms, we simulated the effects of increased river runoff alone and in combination. We manipulated light (clear/shade) and carbon (added/not added) in a fully factorial design, with three replicates. We assessed microzooplankton grazing preferences in each treatment to assess whether increased terrestrial organic matter input would: (1) decrease the phytoplankton to bacterial biomass ratio, (2) shift microzooplanlcton diet from phytoplankton to bacteria, and (3) affect microzooplankton biomass. We found that carbon addition, but not reduced light levels per se resulted in lower phytoplanlcton to bacteria biomass ratios. Microzooplankton generally showed a strong feeding preference for phytoplanlcton over bacteria, but, in carbon-amended mesocosms which favored bacteria, microzooplankton shifted their diet towards bacteria. Furthermore, low total prey availability corresponded with low microzooplankton biomass and the highest bacteria/phytoplankton ratio. Overall our results suggest that in shallow coastal waters, modified with allochthonous matter from river discharge, light attenuation may be inconsequential for the basal producer balance, whereas increased allochthonous carbon, especially if readily bioavailable, favors bacteria over phytoplankton. We conclude that climate change induced shifts at the base of the food web may alter energy mobilization to and the biomass of microzooplankton grazers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Trophic interactions, Food quality, Phytoplankton, Bacteria, Competition, Microzooplankton
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139152 (URN)10.1016/j.marenvres.2017.06.008 (DOI)000407981500021 ()28645656 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Paczkowska, J., Rowe, O., Schlüter, L., Legrand, C., Karlson, B. & Andersson, A. (2017). Allochthonous matter: an important factor shaping the phytoplankton community in the Baltic Sea. Journal of Plankton Research, 39(1), 23-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous matter: an important factor shaping the phytoplankton community in the Baltic Sea
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well-known that nutrients shape phytoplankton communities in marine systems, but in coastal waters allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) may also be of central importance. We studied how humic substances (proxy of ADOM) and other variables influenced the nutritional strategies, size structure and pigment content of the phytoplankton community along a south-north gradient in the Baltic Sea. During the summer, the proportion of mixotrophs increased gradually from the phosphorus-rich south to the ADOM-rich north, probably due to ADOM-fueled microbes. The opposite trend was observed for autotrophs. The chlorophyll a (Chl a): carbon (C) ratio increased while the levels of photoprotective pigments decreased from south to north, indicating adaptation to the darker humic-rich water in the north. Picocyanobacteria dominated in phosphorusrich areas while nanoplankton increased in ADOM- rich areas. During the winter-spring the phytoplankton biomass and concentrations of photoprotective pigments were low, and no trends with respect to autotrophs and mixotrophs were observed. Microplankton was the dominant size group in the entire study area. We conclude that changes in the size structure of the phytoplankton community, the Chl a: C ratio and the concentrations of photoprotective pigments are indicative of changes in ADOM, a factor of particular importance in a changing climate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
phytoplankton, allochthonous dissolved organic matter, humic substances, nitrogen, phosphorus, structuring factors
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126382 (URN)10.1093/plankt/fbw081 (DOI)000397101400004 ()
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Traving, S. J., Rowe, O., Jakobsen, N. M., Sorensen, H., Dinasquet, J., Stedmon, C. A., . . . Riemann, L. (2017). The Effect of Increased Loads of Dissolved Organic Matter on Estuarine Microbial Community Composition and Function. Frontiers in Microbiology, 8, Article ID 351.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Increased Loads of Dissolved Organic Matter on Estuarine Microbial Community Composition and Function
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2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, article id 351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increased river loads are projected as one of the major consequences of climate change in the northern hemisphere, leading to elevated inputs of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) and inorganic nutrients to coastal ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of elevated DOM on a coastal pelagic food web from the coastal northern Baltic Sea, in a 32-day mesocosm experiment. In particular, the study addresses the response of bacterioplankton to differences in character and composition of supplied DOM. The supplied DOM differed in stoichiometry and quality and had pronounced effects on the recipient bacterioplankton, driving compositional changes in response to DOM type. The shifts in bacterioplankton community composition were especially driven by the proliferation of Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Alpha-and Betaproteobacteria populations. The DOM additions stimulated protease activity and a release of inorganic nutrients, suggesting that DOM was actively processed. However, no difference between DOM types was detected in these functions despite different community compositions. Extensive release of re-mineralized carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus was associated with the bacterial processing, corresponding to 25-85% of the supplied DOM. The DOM additions had a negative effect on phytoplankton with decreased Chl a and biomass, particularly during the first half of the experiment. However, the accumulating nutrients likely stimulated phytoplankton biomass which was observed to increase towards the end of the experiment. This suggests that the nutrient access partially outweighed the negative effect of increased light attenuation by accumulating DOM. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that parts of the future elevated riverine DOM supply to the Baltic Sea will be efficiently mineralized by microbes. This will have consequences for bacterioplankton and phytoplankton community composition and function, and significantly affect nutrient biogeochemistry.

Keywords
bacterioplankton community composition, community functions, extracellular enzymes, 16S rRNA, imate change, dissolved organic matter, generalized linear models, Baltic Sea, LONG EF, 1993, LIMNOLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY, V38, P924
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133768 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2017.00351 (DOI)000395728200001 ()28337180 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F., Guleikova, L., Brugel, S., Byström, P. & Andersson, A. (2016). A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 3, 8-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea
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2016 (English)In: Regional Studies in Marine Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi has been well documented in southern areas of the Baltic Sea, however, little research on this invasive species (nor the zooplankton community) has focused on the Gulf of Bothnia (Bothnian Sea and Bay). We analysed data collected over a 12–13 year period at two main stations, one coastal and one offshore, to examine the occurrence of C. pengoi, invasion dynamics, effects on natural zooplankton communities and associated environmental factors. Nine other stations in the Gulf of Bothnia were also examined and the contribution to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) diet was quantified. The zooplankton community response apparently differed between coastal and offshore stations with Bosmina, Eurytemora, and Acartia populations being influenced during peak abundances of C. pengoi. It appears that the native zooplankton community has some resilience, returning to its prior structure outside of peak invasion periods. C. pengoi, where present, contributed significantly to stickleback diet. We explored possible barriers for C. pengoi in the Bothnian Bay, suggesting that the low productive Bothnian Bay ecosystem may be incapable of supporting such a predator. This highlights the need for further studies, especially in the light of global climate change.

Keywords
Cercopagis pengoi, Coast, Zooplankton, Invasive species, Barriers, Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea)
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120860 (URN)10.1016/j.rsma.2015.12.004 (DOI)000414755500002 ()
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Figueroa, D., Rowe, O., Paczkowska, J., Legrand, C. & Andersson, A. (2016). Allochthonous Carbon - a major driver of bacterioplankton production in the subarctic Northern Baltic Sea. Microbial Ecology, 71(4), 789-801
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous Carbon - a major driver of bacterioplankton production in the subarctic Northern Baltic Sea
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2016 (English)In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 789-801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heterotrophic bacteria are, in many aquatic systems, reliant on autochthonous organic carbon as their energy source. One exception is low-productive humic lakes, where allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) is the major driver. We hypothesized that bacterial production (BP) is similarly regulated in subarctic estuaries that receive large amounts of riverine material. BP and potential explanatory factors were measured during May–August 2011 in the subarctic Råne Estuary, northern Sweden. The highest BP was observed in spring, concomitant with the spring river-flush and the lowest rates occurred during summer when primary production (PP) peaked. PLS correlations showed that ∼60 % of the BP variation was explained by different ADOM components, measured as humic substances, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). On average, BP was threefold higher than PP. The bioavailability of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (ADOC) exhibited large spatial and temporal variation; however, the average value was low, ∼2 %. Bioassay analysis showed that BP in the near-shore area was potentially carbon limited early in the season, while BP at seaward stations was more commonly limited by nitrogen-phosphorus. Nevertheless, the bioassay indicated that ADOC could contribute significantly to the in situ BP, ∼60 %. We conclude that ADOM is a regulator of BP in the studied estuary. Thus, projected climate-induced increases in river discharge suggest that BP will increase in subarctic coastal areas during the coming century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Allochthonous organic matter, carbon utilization, bacterioplankton production, Sub-arctic estuary, Baltic Sea
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Earth Sciences with Specialization Environmental Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117966 (URN)10.1007/s00248-015-0714-4 (DOI)000373683000001 ()
Funder
Ecosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F. & Brugel, S. (2016). Födobrist verkar stoppa rovvattenloppa. Havsutsikt (1), 12-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Födobrist verkar stoppa rovvattenloppa
2016 (Swedish)In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122135 (URN)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ask, J., Rowe, O., Brugel, S., Strömgren, M., Byström, P. & Andersson, A. (2016). Importance of coastal primary production in the northern Baltic Sea. Ambio, 45(6), 635-648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of coastal primary production in the northern Baltic Sea
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2016 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 635-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we measured depth-dependent benthic microalgal primary production in a Bothnian Bay estuary to estimate the benthic contribution to total primary production. In addition, we compiled data on benthic microalgal primary production in the entire Baltic Sea. In the estuary, the benthic habitat contributed 17 % to the total annual primary production, and when upscaling our data to the entire Bothnian Bay, the corresponding value was 31 %. This estimated benthic share (31 %) is three times higher compared to past estimates of 10 %. The main reason for this discrepancy is the lack of data regarding benthic primary production in the northern Baltic Sea, but also that past studies overestimated the importance of pelagic primary production by not correcting for system-specific bathymetric variation. Our study thus highlights the importance of benthic communities for the northern Baltic Sea ecosystem in general and for future management strategies and ecosystem studies in particular.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126486 (URN)10.1007/s13280-016-0778-5 (DOI)000382860500001 ()27075572 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-10-28 Created: 2016-10-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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