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Aasa, Ulrika
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Sjöberg, H., Aasa, U., Rosengren, M. & Berglund, L. (2018). Content validity index and reliability of a new protocol for evaluation of lifting technique in the powerlifting squat and deadlift. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content validity index and reliability of a new protocol for evaluation of lifting technique in the powerlifting squat and deadlift
2018 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to create a protocol to cover aspects of technique considered to be associated with risk of injury in the powerlifting squat and deadlift and to examine the content validity and reliability of the aspects included in the protocols. For the content validity investigation, a consensus group of 3 powerlifting physiotherapists identified the domains of content (risk of injury) for 2 protocols (1 for squat and 1 for deadlift) of essential aspects of lifting technique through discussions and a review of the literature. Eight selected powerlifting experts rated the relevance of each aspect in relation to risk of injury (acute or by overuse), and a quantitative estimate of the content validity of each aspect was measured through calculations of a Content Validity Index (CVI). Aspects of low content validity were discarded, and the remainders were evaluated for their inter-rater and intra-rater reliability among 4 experienced powerlifters used to coaching and evaluating powerlifting technique. The reliability was calculated and analyzed with kappa and percentage of agreement. The final protocols included 17 aspects of squat technique and 10 aspects of deadlift technique that showed good to excellent CVI and percentage of agreement between 64 and 100%. The protocols, formed in this study, will provide evidence-based recommendations on safe lifting technique for coaches and strength practitioners' to use to make relevant assessments and instructions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Strength and Conditioning Association, 2018
Keywords
injury prevention, sports medicine, acute injury, overuse injury, resistance training, weightlifting
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152499 (URN)10.1519/JSC.0000000000002791 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Tegern, M., Aasa, U., Ang, B. O., Harms-Ringdahl, K. & Larsson, H. (2018). Inter-rater and test-retest reliability of movement control tests for the neck, shoulder, thoracic, lumbar, and hip regions in military personnel. PLoS ONE, 13(9), Article ID e0204552.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inter-rater and test-retest reliability of movement control tests for the neck, shoulder, thoracic, lumbar, and hip regions in military personnel
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0204552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Strategies are needed to mitigate the high rates and related risks of musculoskeletal complaints and injuries (MSCI) in the military aviator community. Previous work on Swedish Armed Forces (SwAF) soldiers have shown that proper screening methods have been successful in reducing early discharge from military training. Research has pointed at the importance of optimal spinal movement control in military aviators. The aim of this work was to investigate the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of a battery of clinical tests for evaluating movement control in the neck, shoulders, thoracic, lumbar, and hip regions in a population of SwAF military personnel. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability of 15 movement control tests were assessed by crude and prevalence-adjusted kappa coefficient. The study included 37 (inter-rater) and 45 (test-retest) SwAF personnel and was performed with two physiotherapists simultaneously observing and rating the movements on the first occasion and repeated with one physiotherapist on the second occasion. For inter-rater reliability, the kappa coefficient ranged from .19 to .95. Seven tests showed substantial to almost perfect agreement (kappa > .60). With the adjusted kappa, three more tests reached the level of substantial agreement. The corresponding values for test-retest reliability ranged from .26 to .65. Substantial agreement was attained for two tests, three with adjusted kappa. The following tests can reliably be used when screening for biomechanically less advantageous movement patters in military aviators: Shoulder flexion, and rotation, Neck flexion in sitting and supine, Neck extension and rotation in sitting, Pelvic tilt, Forward lean and Single and Double knee extension tests. Grading criteria for tests in supine and quadruped positions need to be further elaborated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153721 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0204552 (DOI)000445639700062 ()30252903 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Westerståhl, M., Jansson, E., Barnekow-Bergkvist, M. & Aasa, U. (2018). Longitudinal changes in physical capacity from adolescence to middle age in men and women. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 14767.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal changes in physical capacity from adolescence to middle age in men and women
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 14767Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate how physical capacity changes from adolescence through early adulthood to middle age with focus on early aging. The aim was also to study if physical capacity in middle age could be predicted by factors in adolescence or early adulthood. A cohort of men and women in Sweden (SPAF-1958, n = 425) have been followed for 36 years, at 16, 34, and 52 years of age. The study includes, among other variables, objective measures of physical capacity. At age 52, 50% of the original cohort participated in exercise testing. Physical capacity increased from 16 to 34 years. From 34 to 52 years, physical capacity decreased in both genders by 15-20% in all but one test. Physical capacity at 16 and 34 years of age were better predictors of physical capacity at age 52 than body dimensions, school grades and life style factors. In conclusion, present data confirm earlier cross-sectional studies regarding the decrease in aerobic capacity and muscular strength during the early ageing period in both genders. The study has also generated novel data that show a smaller decline in muscular endurance than previously reported. Finally, physical capacity is fairly stable from adolescence to middle age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152871 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-33141-3 (DOI)000446339400051 ()30283061 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in SportsFredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseSwedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, V., Berglund, L. & Aasa, U. (2018). Narrative review of injuries in powerlifting with special reference to their association to the squat, bench press and deadlift. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 4, Article ID e000382.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narrative review of injuries in powerlifting with special reference to their association to the squat, bench press and deadlift
2018 (English)In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, E-ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 4, article id e000382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pain and injuries are considered a common problem among elite athletes and recreational lifters performing the squat, bench press and deadlift. Since all three lifts engage multiple joints and expose the lifters' bodies to high physical demands often several times a week, it has been suggested that their injuries might be related to the excessively heavy loads, the large range of motion during the exercises, insufficient resting times between training sessions and/or faulty lifting technique. However, no previous article has summarised what is known about specific injuries and the injury aetiology associated with the three lifts. Thus, the aim of this narrative review was to summarise what is known about the relationships between the powerlifting exercises and the specific injuries or movement impairments that are common among lifters and recreationally active individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152500 (URN)10.1136/bmjsem-2018-000382 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Strömbäck, E., Aasa, U., Gilenstam, K. & Berglund, L. (2018). Prevalence and consequences of injuries in powerlifting: a cross-sectional study. The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 6(5), Article ID 2325967118771016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and consequences of injuries in powerlifting: a cross-sectional study
2018 (English)In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 6, no 5, article id 2325967118771016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Powerlifting consists of the squat, bench press, and dead lift, and extreme loads are lifted during training and competitions. Previous studies, which have defined an injury as an event that causes an interruption in training or competitions, have reported a relatively low frequency of powerlifting injuries (1.0-4.4 injuries/1000 hours of training). No previous study has investigated the prevalence of injuries, defined as a condition of pain or impairment of bodily function that affects powerlifters’ training, in a balanced sample of men and women, and no studies have established possible risk factors for an injury.

Purpose: To investigate the prevalence, localization, and characterization of injuries among Swedish subelite classic powerlifters, with an emphasis on differences between men and women, and to investigate whether training and lifestyle factors are associated with an injury.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: A total of 53 female and 51 male Swedish subelite powerlifters answered an online questionnaire including questions about background characteristics, training habits, and lifestyle factors. The main part of the questionnaire included questions about injuries and their consequences. An injury was defined as a condition of pain or impairment of bodily function that affects powerlifters’ training.

Results: Seventy percent (73/104) of participants were currently injured, and 87% (83/95) had experienced an injury within the past 12 months. The lumbopelvic region, shoulder, and hip were the most commonly injured areas for both sexes. Women experienced a significantly greater frequency of injuries in the neck and thoracic region than men. Injuries seemed to occur during training, although only 16% (11/70) of those currently injured had to completely refrain from training. Training frequency, greater personal best in the dead lift, injury onset during bench-press and dead-lift training, use of straps, alcohol consumption, and dietary issues were associated with current injuries.

Conclusion: Injuries are very common in subelite powerlifters. Men and women report similar injury frequencies but different anatomic locations. These injuries do not prevent powerlifters from training and competing, but they may change the content of training sessions. Why powerlifters develop injuries is still unclear; however, it is likely that the management of training loads and optimization of the lifting technique during the squat, bench press, and dead lift are of importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
sports injury, risk factors, resistance training, low back pain
National Category
Physiotherapy Sport and Fitness Sciences Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
physiotherapy; biomechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147734 (URN)10.1177/2325967118771016 (DOI)000432239400001 ()
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Berglund, L., Aasa, B., Michaelson, P. & Aasa, U. (2018). Sagittal lumbopelvic alignment in patients with low back pain and the effects of a high-load lifting exercise and individualized low-load motor control exercises: a randomized controlled trial. The spine journal, 18(3), 399-406
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sagittal lumbopelvic alignment in patients with low back pain and the effects of a high-load lifting exercise and individualized low-load motor control exercises: a randomized controlled trial
2018 (English)In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 399-406Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Context Assessment of posture and lumbopelvic alignment is often the main focus in the classification and treatment of patients with low back pain (LBP). However, little is known regarding the effects of motor control interventions on objective measures of lumbopelvic alignment.

Purpose The primary aim of this study was to describe the variation of sagittal lumbopelvic alignment in patients with nociceptive mechanical LBP. The secondary aim was to compare the effects of a high-load lifting exercise (HLL) and low-load motor control exercises (LMC) on the change in lumbopelvic alignment with a special emphasis on patients with high and low degrees of lumbar lordosis (lu) and sacral angle (sa).

Study Design This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of HLL and LMC.

Patient Sample Patients from the primary study, that is, patients categorized with nociceptive mechanical LBP, who agreed to participate in the radiographic examination were included (n=66).

Outcome Measures Lateral plain radiographic images were used to evaluate lumbopelvic alignment regarding the lumbar lordosis and the sacral angle as outcomes, with posterior bend as an explanatory variable.

Materials and Methods The participants were recruited to the study from two occupational health-care facilities. They were randomized to either the HLL or the LMC intervention group and offered 12 supervised exercise sessions. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and following the end of intervention period 2 months after baseline. Between- and within-group analyses of intervention groups and subgroups based on the distribution of the baseline values for the lumbar lordosis and the sacral angle, respectively (LOW, MID, and HIGH), were performed using both parametric and non-parametric statistics.

Results The ranges of values for the present sample were 26.9–91.6° (M=59.0°, standard deviation [SD]=11.5°) for the lumbar lordosis and 18.2–72.1° (M=42.0°, SD=9.6°) for the sacral angle. There were no significant differences between the intervention groups in the percent change of eitheroutcome measure. Neither did any outcome change significantly over time within the intervention groups. In the subgroups, based on the distribution of respective baseline values, LOWlu showed a significantly increased lumbar lordosis, whereas HIGHsa showed a significantly decreased sacral angle following intervention.

Conclusions This study describes the wide distribution of values for lumbopelvic alignment for patients with nociceptive mechanical LBP. Further research is needed to investigate subgroups of other types of LBP and contrast findings to those presented in this study. Our results also suggest that retraining of the lumbopelvic alignment could be possible for patients with LBP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Alignment, Deadlift, Low back pain, Lumbar lordosis, Lumbopelvic, Motor control, Sacral angle
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119934 (URN)10.1016/j.spinee.2017.07.178 (DOI)000427617300003 ()28757287 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally published in manuscript form with title [Sagittal lumbo-pelvic alignment in patients with low back pain and the effects of a high-load lifting exercise and individualized low-load motor control exercises - a randomized controlled trial]

Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Tapani, F., Singh, E., Markova, M., Koncalova, M. & Aasa, U. (2017). An inter-tester reliability and feasibility study of the Manual Physiotherapeutic Correction (MFK) method. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 19(1), 2-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An inter-tester reliability and feasibility study of the Manual Physiotherapeutic Correction (MFK) method
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 2-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Czech Manual Physiotherapeutic Correction (MFK) Method® was introduced to Swedish physiotherapists. This study evaluated the inter-tester reliability of the manual muscle testing procedure included in the method. The feasibility of the MFK Method®, when used in Sweden, was also investigated.

Methods: Two Czech physiotherapists, experienced in the MFK Method®, rated performance of the 41 tests included in the manual muscle testing procedure for 20 participants. Cohen’s kappa statistics were performed to evaluate agreement between the raters. When investigating the feasibility of the method, two Swedish physiotherapists used the MFK Method® in the rehabilitation of 10 patients.

Results: Kappa values varied from −0.06 to 0.84. After adjusting for prevalence of failed tests, 15 of the 41 muscle tests demonstrated values of >0.40. When using the MFK Method® in Sweden, several practical obstacles were found.

Conclusion: Most of the tests showed low inter-tester reliability. The testing procedure needs to be further standardized and the practical issues solved before the feasibility of the method, when used in Sweden and/or other countries, can be investigated again.

Keywords
MFK Method, manual muscle test, inter-tester reliability, feasibility
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133227 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2016.1228013 (DOI)000396705000002 ()
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, P., Aasa, U. & Berglund, L. (2017). Clinical examination of physical problems in powerlifters: Development and applicability of a physical examination protocol. In: : . Paper presented at Annual congress OMT/FYIM, Road to Recovery, March 24-25, 2017, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical examination of physical problems in powerlifters: Development and applicability of a physical examination protocol
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136118 (URN)
Conference
Annual congress OMT/FYIM, Road to Recovery, March 24-25, 2017, Stockholm, Sweden
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Aasa, U., Paulin, J. & Madison, G. (2017). Correspondence between physical self-concept and participation in, and fitness change after, bi-weekly body conditioning classes in sedentary women. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31(2), 451-461
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correspondence between physical self-concept and participation in, and fitness change after, bi-weekly body conditioning classes in sedentary women
2017 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 451-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of the study were (1) to investigate the effects of participation in low impact body conditioning classes on physical fitness in sedentary women at different ages and (2) to examine the correspondence between physical self-concept and participation in, and fitness change after, the participation. Ninety-two sedentary women (mean age 44.2 years) participated in 11-weeks of bi-weekly classes that included cardiovascular, strength, core, endurance and mobility exercises, all performed in synchrony with music. Cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal lifting strength, mobility and balance tests were performed pre- and post the exercise period and the short-form Physical Self-Description Questionnaire (PSDQ-S) was completed. Zero-order Spearman correlation analyses showed that women who rated the PSDQ-S dimension Sport competence higher participated in a larger number of sessions (rs=0.24, p=0.040). At post-tests, all participants had increased their balance, the participants aged 20-34 years had increased their lifting strength, and the participants aged 35-65 years had increased their cardiorespiratory fitness and mobility. Most PSDQ-S dimensions did not affect performance change, but the perception of being physically active was related to increased cardiovascular fitness. We conclude that women with a sedentary lifestyle who wish to increase their physical capacity benefit from music exercise and that inquiries about perceived sport competence and physical activity can improve recommendations made by strength and conditioning professionals.

Keywords
balance, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, physical activity
National Category
Psychology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129494 (URN)000393766100026 ()27893472 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-31 Created: 2016-12-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Berglund, L., Aasa, B., Michaelson, P. & Aasa, U. (2017). Effects of Low-Load Motor Control Exercises and a High-Load Lifting Exercise on Lumbar Multifidus Thickness: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Spine, 42(15), E876-E882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Low-Load Motor Control Exercises and a High-Load Lifting Exercise on Lumbar Multifidus Thickness: A Randomized Controlled Trial
2017 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 42, no 15, p. E876-E882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Design. Randomized controlled trial.Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of low-load motor control (LMC) exercises and a high-load lifting (HLL) exercise, on lumbar multifidus (LM) thickness on either side of the spine and whether the effects were affected by pain intensity or change in pain intensity. Summary of Background Data. There is evidence that patients with low back pain (LBP) may have a decreased size of the LM muscles with an asymmetry between sides in the lower back. It has also been shown that LMC training can affect this asymmetry. It is, however, not known whether a high-load exercise has the same effect. Methods. Sixty-five participants diagnosed with nociceptive mechanical LBP were included and randomized into LMC exercises or a HLL exercise, the deadlift. The LM thickness was measured using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI), at baseline and after a 2-month training period. Results. There were no differences between interventions regarding effect on LM muscle thickness. However, the analysis showed a significant effect for asymmetry. The thickness of the LM muscle on the small side increased significantly compared with the large side in both intervention groups, without influence of pain at baseline, or change in pain intensity.Conclusion. At baseline, there was a difference in thickness of the LM muscles between sides. It seems that exercises focusing on spinal alignment may increase the thickness of the LM muscles on the small side, irrespective of exercise load. The increase in LM thickness does not appear to be mediated by either current pain intensity or the magnitude of change in pain intensity.

Keywords
asymmetry, deadlift, exercise, low back pain, morphology, motor control, movement control, pain intensity, physical therapy, resistance training, stabilization training, ultrasonography multifidus
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135618 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000001989 (DOI)000406277300001 ()27870804 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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