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Mejtoft, Thomas, UniversitetslektorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9283-9246
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Mejtoft, T., Cripps, H., Berglund, S., Dlacic, J. & Matia, T. (2019). Internationalization of students’ learning using online technology: Lessons learned. In: A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar (Ed.), 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings. Paper presented at 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019 (pp. 1099-1107). Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internationalization of students’ learning using online technology: Lessons learned
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2019 (English)In: 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings / [ed] A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar, Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press , 2019, p. 1099-1107Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The global nature of business has increased the importance ofstudents’ international experience during their studies at the university. Usinginteractive technologies the projects investigated ways to increase students’motivation to take responsibility for the learning process by creating “real”international co-creation experience online. This paper presents learningsfrom two consecutive international collaborative teaching between EdithCowan University, Australia, and Umeå University, Sweden, in 2017 and EdithCowan University and the University of Rijeka, Croatia, in 2018. Feedbackfrom the students showed they enjoyed working across cultures and academicdiscipline on simulated products and marketing campaigns. Issues raisedincluded: the need to explicitly explain how all parts of project is going to workand how the students execute their role. Incorporation of a formalintroduction process for the students in each location so all students have thesame knowledge about each other. Furthermore, the provision of real-timeopportunities to collaborate in lectures and the setting joint deadlines betweenthe units are of importance. Despite some of the shortcomings of the project,it has provided a firm foundation for the refinement of ongoing collaborativeteaching.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press, 2019
Keywords
Higher education, Online technologies, International collaboration, Learning experience, International
National Category
Pedagogical Work Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160875 (URN)10.18690/978-961-286-280-0.59 (DOI)978-961-286-280-0 (ISBN)
Conference
32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T., Hellman, D. & Söderström, U. (2019). Reclaiming control over personal data with blockchain technology: An exploratory study. In: A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar (Ed.), 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings. Paper presented at 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019 (pp. 411-425). Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reclaiming control over personal data with blockchain technology: An exploratory study
2019 (English)In: 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings / [ed] A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar, Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press , 2019, p. 411-425Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the digitalization and increasing number of Internet users,more and more personal data breaches occur. Many people are not awareof their personal data rights and have not received any instructions on howto act in situations such as when their personal data is abused. This issomething that illustrates the flaws of the Internet. A technology thatprovides solutions to some of these problems, such as trust andtransparency, is the blockchain technology. Hence, the objective of thispaper is to investigate knowledge about personal data rights and to explorethe design of a prototype of a blockchain application for increased securityand transparency. User tests were conducted, highlighting the greatestneeds for users to feel secure and in control over their personal data. Thisknowledge provide the foundation for a prototype based on blockchaintechnology that gives the users increased security and forces those whostore personal data to be more transparent with the usage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press, 2019
Keywords
Blockchain, Personal data, User test, Exploratory Study, Internet
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160870 (URN)10.18690/978-961-286-280-0.22 (DOI)978-961-286-280-0 (ISBN)
Conference
32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T., Ristiniemi, C., Söderström, U. & Mårell-Olsson, E. (2019). User experience design and digital nudging in a decision making process. In: A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar (Ed.), 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Societ: Conference Proceedings. Paper presented at 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019 (pp. 427-442). Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User experience design and digital nudging in a decision making process
2019 (English)In: 32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing Technology for a Sustainable Societ: Conference Proceedings / [ed] A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, J. Seitz, H. Cripps & D. Vidmar, Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press , 2019, p. 427-442Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When using online nudges to steer people in the right directionwhile they are making a decision, there is usually one preferable outcome.What might happen if the user experience is inadequate, will the nudgesstill work or might they be undermined? In this paper we investigate thecorrelation between user experience and digital nudges in a decisionmaking process. A user A/B test was conducted to investigate theproblem. The test participants visited one of two websites that includedthe same nudges where they were nudged to choose option (a) instead of(b). The only difference in the websites was the quality of the userexperience, one website design had a good user experience while the otherone offered an inadequate user experience. The results showed thateveryone who was assigned the good user experience chose (a), while twoof the inadequate experience participants chose (b). The results indicatethat user experience design can be used for digital nudging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press, 2019
Keywords
Digital Nudging, User Experience, Decision Making Process, Decision, User
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160874 (URN)10.18690/978-961-286-280-0.23 (DOI)978-961-286-280-0 (ISBN)
Conference
32nd Bled eConference: Humanizing technology for a sustainable society, Bled, Slovenia, June 16-19, 2019
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-10-29Bibliographically approved
Mårell-Olsson, E., Mejtoft, T. & Kinert, J. (2019). Virtual reality as an environment for learning: Facilitating a controlled environment for pupils with diagnosed concentration disorders (1ed.). In: Ilona Buchem, Ralf Klamma, Fridolin Wild (Ed.), Perspectives on Wearable Enhanced Learning (WELL): Current Trends, Research, and Practice (pp. 367-384). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual reality as an environment for learning: Facilitating a controlled environment for pupils with diagnosed concentration disorders
2019 (English)In: Perspectives on Wearable Enhanced Learning (WELL): Current Trends, Research, and Practice / [ed] Ilona Buchem, Ralf Klamma, Fridolin Wild, Springer, 2019, 1, p. 367-384Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pupils with concentration disorders need an education that is adapted for them for fulfilling the goals of their education. They often need an adjustable learning environment with fewer distractions. Unfortunately, the public education system often fails in providing such pupils the aid and the support they need. This paper presents a study regarding how virtual reality (VR) can be used as a learning support for pupils aged 16–18 years with diagnosed concentration disorders and how this technology can support them in accomplishing their educational goals. This study was performed as a case study with three sources of data – (1) observations during a key task test, (2) qualitative interviews with the participants, and (3) a survey. The findings are presented in three themes; 1) increasing the ability to concentrate, 2) the suitability of using VR technology in learning, and 3) developing knowledge acquisition with the support of VR technology. The findings indicate that the level of concentration can be increased while using VR technology due to a controlled environment and that VR technology can be suitable as a complement in education for pupils with concentration disorders and can support pupils in developing their own knowledge according to their specific needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Keywords
Virtual Reality, Wearable Enhanced Learning, Controlled Learning Environment, Learning, Concentration disorders
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164826 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-64301-4_17 (DOI)978-3-319-64301-4 (ISBN)978-3-319-64300-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-02 Created: 2019-11-02 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T., Cripps, H., Berglund, S. & Singh, A. (2018). Collaborative teaching project to increase students’ international experience: Experience from interweaving units in Australia and Sweden. In: Abstrakt – NU 2018: . Paper presented at NU2018 – Det akademiska lärarskapet, 9–11 oktober 2018, Västerås. , Article ID 650.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative teaching project to increase students’ international experience: Experience from interweaving units in Australia and Sweden
2018 (English)In: Abstrakt – NU 2018, 2018, article id 650Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The global nature of business means getting international experience during studies at the universityis continuously increasing in importance. This project seeks to investigate the possibility of increasing students’ motivation to take responsibility for the learning process by creating “real” situations including international experience without having to travel abroad (Wen, Zaid & Harun, 2015; De-Marcos et al, 2014).

This project involved the interweaving of the content of two units: Prototyping for Mobile Applications at Umeå University, Sweden, a fourth year unit on the five-year MSc engineering program in interaction technology and design and Current Issues in Marketing at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia, a third year marketing unit. Consequently, the engineering students created prototypes for mobile apps while the marketing students created marketing material. The virtual communication platform Slack was used to assist collaboration between students (Labus et al,2015).

The challenge in the design of this collaborative curriculum was that the students must be able to finish their unit in case of collaborative problems. Hence, there was no total dependence between the two units and the lecturers used ad hoc flexibility over the course of the collaboration. It was also decided not to give the students all information about the project at the start of the units but rather on a need-to-know basis.

The student review of the project showed that they liked the idea of the project but a more structured approach would be beneficial. Students on both sides of dyad often struggled with the unknowns, as they were reliant on students half a world away. However, from the communication platform it could be observed that the students exhibited skills in finding solutions and workarounds to complete their assessments.

Analysing the project among teachers involved, revealed some challenges, however all teachers consider that this type of international collaborative curriculum can benefit the students (Chang &Lee, 2013). Challenges during the collaborative project included, stilted exchanges on issues due to time differences, differing understandings of cultural priorities and aligning the timing of assessment of the units’ requirements. However, benefits to the students included, experience to give and receive feedback, experiencing a new business culture and technologies, development of online media skills and having to solve real world problems. For the Australian students an added benefit was the visit to Perth of one of the Swedish teachers, which supplement their online experience (Lin, 2016). This may have contributed to a greater positivity toward the project reflected in their course evaluation.

Experiences and learnings from the project include (1) the need to explicitly explain how all parts of project is going to work and how the students execute their role, (2) supervise a formal introduction of the students in each location so all students have the same knowledge about each other, (3) provide real-time opportunities by setting Swedish lectures in the morning and Australia lectures inthe afternoon, and (4) set joint deadlines between the two units and make clear the consequences offailing to meet deadlines.

National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157001 (URN)
Conference
NU2018 – Det akademiska lärarskapet, 9–11 oktober 2018, Västerås
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Fahlman, E., Mejtoft, T. & Cripps, H. (2018). Evaluation of Push Notifications for Social Media Applications. In: A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, P. Ravesteijn, J. Seitz & R. Bons (Ed.), 31st Bled eConference Digital Transformation: Meeting the Challenges. Conference Proceedings. Paper presented at 31st Bled eConference Digital Transformation: Meeting the Challenges. June 17–20, 2018, Bled, Slovenia (pp. 317-330). Maribor: University of Maribor Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Push Notifications for Social Media Applications
2018 (English)In: 31st Bled eConference Digital Transformation: Meeting the Challenges. Conference Proceedings / [ed] A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, P. Ravesteijn, J. Seitz & R. Bons, Maribor: University of Maribor Press , 2018, p. 317-330Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The growth of social media has impacted on people’s everyday life, precipitating the development of a new set of guidelines for designing applications (apps), creating heightened user engagement without crossing the line to frustration. This study focuses on how push notifications from social media apps should be designed in order to keep the user intrigued and returning to the app, without annoying the user to the point where they turn the push notifications off. The exponential growth in the usage of social media has emphasised the importance of designing apps with a user-centred functionality. The study used a combination of a survey questionnaire and a qualitative perception study, with the results collected as both data and extracts from interviews. This study identified that a high frequency of notifications from social media apps has led to resentment by users against pushes notifications in general. The app-user relationship is cemented from the beginning of the experience and the action the user takes in relation to notifications depends on their perception of the senders’ intentions. Younger users’ actions are also predominately driven by the phenomena Fear of Missing Out.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maribor: University of Maribor Press, 2018
Keywords
Social media, Push notification, Users perceptions
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156998 (URN)10.18690/978-961-286-170-4.21 (DOI)978-961-286-170-4 (ISBN)
Conference
31st Bled eConference Digital Transformation: Meeting the Challenges. June 17–20, 2018, Bled, Slovenia
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T. & Söderström, U. (2018). Intressentfokuserade oberoende longitudinella utvärderingar. In: Lena Peterson, Kristina Edström, Oskar Gedda, Fredrik Georgsson, Liselott Lycke och Marie Arehag (Ed.), Proceedings från 6:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar: . Paper presented at 6:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, Chalmers tekniska högskola, 22-23 november 2017 (pp. 94-96). Göteborg: Chalmers tekniska högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intressentfokuserade oberoende longitudinella utvärderingar
2018 (Swedish)In: Proceedings från 6:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Lena Peterson, Kristina Edström, Oskar Gedda, Fredrik Georgsson, Liselott Lycke och Marie Arehag, Göteborg: Chalmers tekniska högskola , 2018, p. 94-96Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Utbildningskvalité är en mycket viktig fråga som diskuteras frekvent inom universitetsvärlden. Såväl kontroll som förbättring av utbildningskvalité är i många lägen starkt kopplat till olika former av utvärderingar. Denna artikel syftar till att illustrera och analysera en utvärderingsmodell som har använts på ett civilingenjörsprogram vid Umeå universitet. Målsättningen med utvärderingsmodellen är att skapa mer holistiska utvärderingar med ett starkare fokus på de intressenter som finns för kvalitetsutveckling - studenter och lärare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Chalmers tekniska högskola, 2018
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147747 (URN)978-91-88041-11-1 (ISBN)
Conference
6:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, Chalmers tekniska högskola, 22-23 november 2017
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T., Långström, A. & Söderström, U. (2018). The effect of skeleton screens: Users’ perception of speed and ease of navigation. In: Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: . Paper presented at ECCE'18 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5–7, 2018. New York, NY: ACM Press, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of skeleton screens: Users’ perception of speed and ease of navigation
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2018, article id 22Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Progression bars and spinners have long been the norm when providing feedback during wait times on the web. However, a more recent trend is the use of skeleton screens. This paper aims to evaluate the usefulness of skeleton screens as an alternative to spinners. This is done user testing a fictional news site with two variations, one showing skeleton screens before content is loaded, and another utilizing spinners. Both a questionnaire and measuring timing while finding a specified article when entering a website for the first time was used. The results show that the page using skeleton screens, scored higher on average on both perceived speed and ease of navigation. However, people using the page with spinners were faster at finding the article when entering the site for the first time. The results of this paper cannot show any significant differences in any of the comparisons between the web pages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2018
Keywords
feedback, skeleton screens, spinners
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157000 (URN)10.1145/3232078.3232086 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055328583 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6449-2 (ISBN)
Conference
ECCE'18 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5–7, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Söderström, U., Bååth, M. & Mejtoft, T. (2018). The Users’ Time Perception: The effect of various animation speeds on loading screens. In: Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: . Paper presented at ECCE'18 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5–7, 2018. New York, NY: ACM Press, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Users’ Time Perception: The effect of various animation speeds on loading screens
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2018, article id 21Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Loading screens are still important in 2018, and there is a reason for that: they provide a great way to give feedback to the user in the interface during wait times after a user's action. Previous research shows that it is essential for a well designed interface and it is a well established way to increase and maintain a user's satisfaction. This study specifically examine the looped, passive animation screen with regards to how the animation speed affects the user. Results suggests that with faster animation, perceived wait time gets shorter and the user is more satisfied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2018
Keywords
Passive loading screen, Wait time, User satisfaction
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156999 (URN)10.1145/3232078.3232092 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055336515 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6449-2 (ISBN)
Conference
ECCE'18 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5–7, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Mejtoft, T., Lindberg, L., Söderström, U. & Mårell-Olsson, E. (2017). Feedback in commercial educational applications: Guidelines and conceptual framework. In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017 (ECCE 2017): . Paper presented at European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017 (ECCE 2017), Umeå, Sweden, September 19- 22, 2017 (pp. 113-120). ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feedback in commercial educational applications: Guidelines and conceptual framework
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017 (ECCE 2017), ACM Digital Library, 2017, p. 113-120Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, schools made large investments to increase the integration and use of contemporary technologies in teaching and learning.Today iPads and educational applications are growing in popularity and are commonly used. These technologies have a potential beneficial effect on the learning, but studies show that some applications have flaws that hinder these positive effects, for example regarding the feedback provided to the user. This study has determined a number of guidelines for effective feedback in a learning situation and has further shown how well these guidelines can be reached in an educational application today. The study shows that there are both advantages and disadvantages of feedback in an application compared to giving feedback in a more traditional learning situation. Many of the guidelines for effective feedback were found to be possible to reach in an application, and the greatest advantage found in applications is that they can provide feedback timely on each action taken by the pupils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2017
Keywords
Interaction design, Activity centered design, Education, Interactive learning environments, Computer-assisted instruction
National Category
Interaction Technologies Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139886 (URN)10.1145/3121283.3121286 (DOI)978-1-4503-5256-7 (ISBN)
Conference
European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017 (ECCE 2017), Umeå, Sweden, September 19- 22, 2017
Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9283-9246

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