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Neumann, Anne
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Neumann, A., Lindholm, L., Norberg, M., Schoffer, O., Klug, S. J. & Norström, F. (2017). The cost-effectiveness of interventions targeting lifestyle change for the prevention of diabetes in a Swedish primary care and community based prevention program. European Journal of Health Economics, 18(7), 905-919
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cost-effectiveness of interventions targeting lifestyle change for the prevention of diabetes in a Swedish primary care and community based prevention program
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 1618-7598, E-ISSN 1618-7601, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 905-919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Policymakers need to know the cost-effec-tiveness of interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes (T2D). The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a T2D prevention initiative targeting weight reduction, increased physical activity and healthier diet in persons in pre-diabetic states by comparing a hypothetical intervention versus no intervention in a Swedish setting. Methods: A Markov model was used to study the cost-effectiveness of a T2D prevention program based on lifestyle change versus a control group where no prevention was applied. Analyses were done deterministically and probabilistically based on Monte Carlo simulation for six different scenarios defined by sex and age groups (30, 50, 70 years). Cost and quality adjusted life year (QALY) differences between no intervention and intervention and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated and visualized in cost-effectiveness planes (CE planes) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEA curves). Results: All ICERs were cost-effective and ranged from 3833 € /QALY gained (women, 30 years) to 9215 € /QALY gained (men, 70 years). The CEA curves showed that the probability of the intervention being cost-effective at the threshold value of 50,000 € per QALY gained was very high for all scenarios ranging from 85.0 to 91.1%. Discussion/conclusion: The prevention or the delay of the onset of T2D is feasible and cost-effective. A small investment in healthy lifestyle with change in physical activity and diet together with weight loss are very likely to be cost-effective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2017
Keywords
Markov model, cost-effectiveness, diabetes, prevention, lifestyle change
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123560 (URN)10.1007/s10198-016-0851-9 (DOI)000406690000009 ()27913943 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-06 Created: 2016-07-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Neumann, A. (2016). Prevention of type 2 diabetes: modeling the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevention of type 2 diabetes: modeling the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Diabetes is a common and costly disease that is expected to continue even to grow in prevalence and health expenditures over the coming decades. Type 2 diabetes is the most common diabetes type and is characterized by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes develops over a long period and is often undetected over years. During this time, people almost always first develop any of the pre-diabetic states, i.e. impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or a combination of both (IFG&IGT). This thesis focuses on type 2 diabetes only. In the following, the term diabetes is used to refer to type 2 diabetes only. Diabetes is associated with a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. While those are not the only factors contributing to the development and maintenance of diabetes, several studies have shown that prevention of diabetes among individuals at high risk through lifestyle change is possible, effective and cost-effective, especially targeting diet and exercise to reduce weight. No previous study had, however, estimated the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention strategies from a population-based perspective including healthy individuals and also considered IFG and IGT as two distinct pre-diabetic states.

Objective: The overall objective of this thesis was to establish, describe and evaluate a model that can assess the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programs to prevent diabetes.

Methods: First, a Markov Model was established using data from the literature. The cost of a German diabetes prevention program was estimated. Second, risk equations for change to worsened glucose states were estimated using factor analysis and logistic regression based on consecutive data from the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP). The risk equations described transition probabilities in the final model and were based on several risk factors such as age, sex, physical activity and smoking status. Third, information on the Short-Form 36 questionnaire from the VIP population was transformed into Short-Form 6D. Health utility weights (HUW) by glucose group and four risk factors were estimated using beta regression. Fourth, an updated Markov model was established using an updated model structure compared to the one in Paper I, program costs of Paper I, risk equations of Paper II, health utility weights of Paper III and updated cost and mortality estimates.

Results: The first model in Paper I showed that lifestyle intervention programs have the potential to be cost-effective with a high degree of uncertainty. The risk equations in Paper II indicated that the impact of each risk factor depended on the starting and ending pre-diabetes state, where high levels of triglyceride, hypertension, and high body mass index were the strongest risk factors to transit to a worsened glucose state. The overall mean HUW in Paper III was 0.764 with healthy individuals having the highest HUW, those with diabetes the lowest and those in pre-diabetic states ranging in between. The intervention described in Paper IV was cost-effective for all sex and age scenarios ranging from 3,833 EUR/QALY gained (women, 30 years) to 9,215 EUR/QALY gained (men, 70 years). The probability that the intervention is cost-effective was high (85.0-91.1%).

Conclusion: We established a model that can estimate the cost-effectiveness of different scenarios of initiatives to prevent diabetes. The prevention or the delay of the onset of diabetes is feasible and cost-effective. A small investment in a healthy lifestyle with the change in physical activity and diet together with weight loss can have a decent, cost-effective result. The full range of possibilities this model offers has not been evaluated so far. We have, however, shown that implementing a lifestyle intervention program like the Västerbotten Intervention Programme would be cost-effective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2016. p. 69
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1821
Keywords
type 2 diabetes mellitus, prevention, health economics, Markov modeling, risk equations, health-related quality of life, lifestyle modification, pre-diabetic states, cost-effectiveness, Västerbotten Intervention Programme
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123553 (URN)978-91-7601-517-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-09-02, sal 135, Allmänmedicin, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-07-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Neumann, A., Schoffer, O., Norström, F., Norberg, M., Klug, S. J. & Lindholm, L. (2014). Health-related quality of life for pre-diabetic states and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in Västerbotten Sweden. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 12(1), Article ID 150.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life for pre-diabetic states and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study in Västerbotten Sweden
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2014 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) decreases health-related quality of life, but there is a lack of information about the health status of people in pre-diabetic states. However, information on health utility weights (HUWs) for pre-diabetic states and T2D are essential to estimate the effect of prevention initiatives. We estimated and compared HUWs for healthy individuals, those with pre-diabetes and those with T2D in a Swedish population and evaluated the influence of age, sex, education and body mass index on HUWs.

Methods: Participants of the Västerbotten Intervention Program, Sweden, between 2002 and 2012, who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test or indicated they had T2D and who filled in the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) were included. Individuals were categorized as healthy, being in any of three different pre-diabetic states, or as T2D. The pre-diabetic states are impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or a combination of both (IFG&IGT). The SF-6D index was used to convert SF-36 responses to HUWs. HUWswere stratified by age, sex, education and body mass index. Beta regression analyses were conducted to estimate the effect of multiple risk factors on the HUWs.

Results: In total, 55 882 individuals were included in the analysis. The overall mean HUW was 0.764. The mean HUW of healthy individuals was 0.768, 0.759 for those with IFG, 0.746 for those with IGT, 0.745 for those with IFG&IGT, and 0.738 for those with T2D. In the overall model, all variables except underweight vs. normal weight were significantly associated with HUW. Younger age, male sex, and higher education were associated with increased HUW. Normal weight, or being overweight was associated with elevated HUW, while obesity was associated with lower HUW.

Conclusions: Healthy individuals had higher HUWs than participants with T2D, while individuals with IFG, IGT or IFG&IGT had HUWs that ranged between those for NGT and T2D. Therefore, preventing the development of pre-diabetic states would improve health-related quality of life in addition to lowering the risk of developing T2D.

Keywords
Health utility, Normal glucose tolerance, Impaired fasting glucose, Impaired glucose tolerance, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, Sweden, SF-36, SF-6D, Health-related quality of life, Beta regression
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95816 (URN)10.1186/s12955-014-0150-z (DOI)000345355300001 ()25342083 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Neumann, A., Norberg, M., Schoffer, O., Norström, F., Johansson, I., Klug, S. J. & Lindholm, L. (2013). Risk equations for the development of worsened glucose status and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Swedish intervention program. BMC Public Health, 13, Article ID 1014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk equations for the development of worsened glucose status and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Swedish intervention program
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2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, article id 1014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several studies investigated transitions and risk factors from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). However, there is a lack of information on the probabilities to transit from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to different pre-diabetic states and from these states to T2D. The objective of our study is to estimate these risk equations and to quantify the influence of single or combined risk factors on these transition probabilities. Methods: Individuals who participated in the VIP program twice, having the first examination at ages 30, 40 or 50 years of age between 1990 and 1999 and the second examination 10 years later were included in the analysis. Participants were grouped into five groups: NGT, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), IGT, IFG&IGT or T2D. Fourteen potential risk factors for the development of a worse glucose state (pre-diabetes or T2D) were investigated: sex, age, education, perceived health, triglyceride, blood pressure, BMI, smoking, physical activity, snus, alcohol, nutrition and family history. Analysis was conducted in two steps. Firstly, factor analysis was used to find candidate variables; and secondly, logistic regression was employed to quantify the influence of the candidate variables. Bootstrap estimations validated the models. Results: In total, 29 937 individuals were included in the analysis. Alcohol and perceived health were excluded due to the results of the factor analysis and the logistic regression respectively. Six risk equations indicating different impacts of different risk factors on the transition to a worse glucose state were estimated and validated. The impact of each risk factor depended on the starting or ending pre-diabetes state. High levels of triglyceride, hypertension and high BMI were the strongest risk factors to transit to a worsened glucose state. Conclusions: The equations could be used to identify individuals with increased risk to develop any of the three pre-diabetic states or T2D and to adapt prevention strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2013
Keywords
Diabetes mellitus, type 2, Pre-diabetic state, Prevention & control, Risk factors, Glucose, Sweden, Logistic models, Factor analysis, statistical, Early intervention, Life style
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85814 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-13-1014 (DOI)000329290200002 ()
Available from: 2014-02-12 Created: 2014-02-10 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Neumann, A., Schwarz, P. & Lindholm, L. (2011). Estimating the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programmes to prevent diabetes based on an example from Germany: Markov modelling. Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, 9(1), Article ID 17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programmes to prevent diabetes based on an example from Germany: Markov modelling
2011 (English)In: Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, ISSN 1478-7547, E-ISSN 1478-7547, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) poses a large worldwide burden for health care systems. One possible tool to decrease this burden is primary prevention. As it is unethical to wait until perfect data are available to conclude whether T2D primary prevention intervention programmes are cost-effective, we need a model that simulates the effect of prevention initiatives. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness of lifestyle intervention programmes for the prevention of T2D using a Markov model. As decision makers often face difficulties in applying health economic results, we visualise our results with health economic tools.

METHODS: We use four-state Markov modelling with a probabilistic cohort analysis to calculate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. A one-year cycle length and a lifetime time horizon are applied. Best available evidence supplies the model with data on transition probabilities between glycaemic states, mortality risks, utility weights, and disease costs. The costs are calculated from a societal perspective. A 3% discount rate is used for costs and QALYs. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves are presented to assist decision makers.

RESULTS: The model indicates that diabetes prevention interventions have the potential to be cost-effective, but the outcome reveals a high level of uncertainty. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were negative for the intervention, ie, the intervention leads to a cost reduction for men and women aged 30 or 50 years at initiation of the intervention. For men and women aged 70 at initiation of the intervention, the ICER was EUR27,546/QALY gained and EUR19,433/QALY gained, respectively. In all cases, the QALYs gained were low. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves show that the higher the willingness-to-pay threshold value, the higher the probability that the intervention is cost-effective. Nonetheless, all curves are flat. The threshold value of EUR50,000/QALY gained has a 30-55% probability that the intervention is cost-effective.

CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle interventions for primary prevention of type 2 diabetes are cost-saving for men and women aged 30 or 50 years at the start of the intervention, and cost-effective for men and women aged 70 years. However, there is a high degree of uncertainty around the ICERs. With the conservative approach adopted for this model, the long-term effectiveness of the intervention could be underestimated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2011
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57584 (URN)10.1186/1478-7547-9-17 (DOI)22099547 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-07 Created: 2012-08-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Pajunen, P., Landgraf, R., Muylle, F., Neumann, a., Lindstrom, J., Schwarz, P. E. & Peltonen, M. (2010). Quality Indicators for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe - IMAGE. Hormone and Metabolic Research, 42(Suppl 1), S56-S63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality Indicators for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe - IMAGE
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2010 (English)In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 42, no Suppl 1, p. S56-S63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The marked increase of type 2 diabetes necessitates active development and implementation of efficient prevention programs. A European level action has been taken by launching the IMAGE project to unify and improve the various prevention management concepts, which currently exist within the EU. This report describes the background and the methods used in the development of the IMAGE project quality indicators for diabetes primary prevention programs. It is targeted to the persons responsible for diabetes prevention at different levels of the health care systems. Methods: Development of the quality indicators was conducted by a group of specialists representing different professional groups from several European countries. Indicators and measurement recommendations were produced by the expert group in consensus meetings and further developed by combining evidence and expert opinion. Results: The quality indicators were developed for different prevention strategies: population level prevention strategy, screening for high risk, and high risk prevention strategy. Totally, 22 quality indicators were generated. They constitute the minimum level of quality assurance recommended for diabetes prevention programs. In addition, 20 scientific evaluation indicators with measurement standards were produced. These micro level indicators describe measurements, which should be used if evaluation, reporting, and scientific analysis are planned. Conclusions: We hope that these quality tools together with the IMAGE guidelines will provide a useful tool for improving the quality of diabetes prevention in Europe and make different prevention approaches comparable.

Keywords
diabetes prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109716 (URN)10.1055/s-0029-1240976 (DOI)000277128100004 ()20391308 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-05 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindstrom, J., Neumann, A., Sheppard, K. E., Gilis-Januszewska, A., Greaves, C. J., Handke, U., . . . Schwarz, P. E. (2010). Take Action to Prevent Diabetes: The IMAGE Toolkit for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe. Hormone and Metabolic Research, 42(Suppl 1), S37-S55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Take Action to Prevent Diabetes: The IMAGE Toolkit for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe
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2010 (English)In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 42, no Suppl 1, p. S37-S55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When we ask people what they value most, health is usually top of the list. While effective care is available for many chronic diseases, the fact remains that for the patient, the tax payer and the whole of society: Prevention is Better Than Cure. Diabetes and its complications are a serious threat to the survival and well-being of an increasing number of people. It is predicted that one in ten Europeans aged 20-79 will have developed diabetes by 2030. Once a disease of old age, diabetes is now common among adults of all ages and is beginning to affect adolescents and even children. Diabetes accounts for up to 18% of total healthcare expenditure in Europe. The Good News is That Diabetes is Preventable. Compelling evidence shows that the onset of diabetes can be prevented or delayed greatly in individuals at high risk (people with impaired glucose regulation). Clinical research has shown a reduction in risk of developing diabetes of over 50% following relatively modest changes in lifestyle that include adopting a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight. These results have since been reproduced in real-world prevention programmes. Even a delay of a few years in the progression to diabetes is expected to reduce diabetes-related complications, such as heart, kidney and eye disease and, consequently, to reduce the cost to society. A comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention should combine population based primary prevention with programmes targeted at those who are at high risk. This approach should take account of the local circumstances and diversity within modern society (e.g. social inequalities). The challenge goes beyond the healthcare system. We need to encourage collaboration across many different sectors: education providers, non-governmental organisations, the food industry, the media, urban planners and politicians all have a very important role to play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wuppertal, Germany.: , 2010
Keywords
diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109715 (URN)10.1055/s-0029-1240975 (DOI)000277128100003 ()20391307 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-05 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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