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Rieckmann, Anna
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Karalija, N., Wåhlin, A., Ek, J., Rieckmann, A., Papenberg, G., Salami, A., . . . Nyberg, L. (2019). Cardiovascular factors are related to dopamine integrity and cognition in aging. Annals of clinical and translational neurology, 6(11), 2291-2303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular factors are related to dopamine integrity and cognition in aging
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2019 (English)In: Annals of clinical and translational neurology, E-ISSN 2328-9503, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 2291-2303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aging brain undergoes several changes, including reduced vascular, structural, and dopamine (DA) system integrity. Such brain changes have been associated with age‐related cognitive deficits. However, their relative importance, interrelations, and links to risk factors remain elusive.

Methods: The present work used magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 11C‐raclopride to jointly examine vascular parameters (white‐matter lesions and perfusion), DA D2‐receptor availability, brain structure, and cognitive performance in healthy older adults (n = 181, age: 64–68 years) from the Cognition, Brain, and Aging (COBRA) study.

Results: Covariance was found among several brain indicators, where top predictors of cognitive performance included caudate and hippocampal integrity (D2DR availability and volumes), and cortical blood flow and regional volumes. White‐matter lesion burden was negatively correlated with caudate DA D2‐receptor availability and white‐matter microstructure. Compared to individuals with smaller lesions, individuals with confluent lesions (exceeding 20 mm in diameter) had reductions in cortical and hippocampal perfusion, striatal and hippocampal D2‐receptor availability, white‐matter microstructure, and reduced performance on tests of episodic memory, sequence learning, and processing speed. Higher cardiovascular risk as assessed by treatment for hypertension, systolic blood pressure, overweight, and smoking was associated with lower frontal cortical perfusion, lower putaminal D2DR availability, smaller grey‐matter volumes, a larger number of white‐matter lesions, and lower episodic memory performance.

Interpretation: Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced cardiovascular health is associated with poorer status for brain variables that are central to age‐sensitive cognitive functions, with emphasis on DA integrity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165743 (URN)10.1002/acn3.50927 (DOI)000496520700016 ()31663685 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseRagnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Swedish Brain FoundationVästerbotten County CouncilMax Planck SocietySwedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved
Salami, A., Garrett, D. D., Wåhlin, A., Rieckmann, A., Papenberg, G., Karalija, N., . . . Nyberg, L. (2019). Dopamine D2/3 Binding Potential Modulates Neural Signatures of Working Memory in a Load-Dependent Fashion.. Journal of Neuroscience, 39(3), 537-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dopamine D2/3 Binding Potential Modulates Neural Signatures of Working Memory in a Load-Dependent Fashion.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 537-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dopamine (DA) modulates corticostriatal connections. Studies in which imaging of the DA system is integrated with functional imaging during cognitive performance have yielded mixed findings. Some work has shown a link between striatal DA (measured by PET) and fMRI activations, whereas others have failed to observe such a relationship. One possible reason for these discrepant findings is differences in task demands, such that a more demanding task with greater prefrontal activations may yield a stronger association with DA. Moreover, a potential DA–BOLD association may be modulated by task performance. We studied 155 (104 normal-performing and 51 low-performing) healthy older adults (43% females) who underwent fMRI scanning while performing a working memory (WM) n-back task along with DA D2/3 PET assessment using [11C]raclopride. Using multivariate partial-least-squares analysis, we observed a significant pattern revealing positive associations of striatal as well as extrastriatal DA D2/3 receptors to BOLD response in the thalamo–striatal–cortical circuit, which supports WM functioning. Critically, the DA–BOLD association in normal-performing, but not low-performing, individuals was expressed in a load-dependent fashion, with stronger associations during 3-back than 1-/2-back conditions. Moreover, normal-performing adults expressing upregulated BOLD in response to increasing task demands showed a stronger DA–BOLD association during 3-back, whereas low-performing individuals expressed a stronger association during 2-back conditions. This pattern suggests a nonlinear DA–BOLD performance association, with the strongest link at the maximum capacity level. Together, our results suggest that DA may have a stronger impact on functional brain responses during more demanding cognitive tasks.

Keywords
PET, aging, dopamine, fMRI, working memory
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155492 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1493-18.2018 (DOI)000455849400013 ()30478031 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseRagnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Swedish Brain FoundationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Wachinger, C., Nho, K., Saykin, A. J., Reuter, M. & Rieckmann, A. (2018). A Longitudinal Imaging Genetics Study of Neuroanatomical Asymmetry in Alzheimer's Disease. Biological Psychiatry, 84(7), 522-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Longitudinal Imaging Genetics Study of Neuroanatomical Asymmetry in Alzheimer's Disease
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2018 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 84, no 7, p. 522-530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Contralateral brain structures represent a unique, within-patient reference element for disease, and asymmetries can provide a personalized measure of the accumulation of past disease processes. Neuroanatomical shape asymmetries have recently been associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the biological basis of asymmetric brain changes in AD remains unknown.

METHODS: We investigated genetic influences on brain asymmetry by identifying associations between magnetic resonance imaging-derived measures of asymmetry and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have previously been identified in genome-wide association studies for AD diagnosis and for brain subcortical volumes. For analyzing longitudinal neuroimaging data (1241 individuals, 6395 scans), we used a mixed effects model with interaction between genotype and diagnosis.

RESULTS: Significant associations between asymmetry of the amygdala, hippocampus, and putamen and SNPs in the genes BIN1, CD2AP, ZCWPW1, ABCA7, TNKS, and DLG2 were found.

CONCLUSIONS: The associations between SNPs in the genes TNKS and DLG2 and AD-related increases in shape asymmetry are of particular interest; these SNPs have previously been associated with subcortical volumes of amygdala and putamen but have not yet been associated with AD pathology. For AD candidate SNPs, we extend previous work to show that their effects on subcortical brain structures are asymmetric. This provides novel evidence about the biological underpinnings of brain asymmetry as a disease marker.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Alzheimer's, Asymmetry, Genetics, Imaging, Longitudinal, Shape
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151765 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.04.017 (DOI)000443278700010 ()29885764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Rieckmann, A., Johnson, K. A., Sperling, R. A., Buckner, R. L. & Hedden, T. (2018). Dedifferentiation of caudate functional connectivity and striatal dopamine transporter density predict memory change in normal aging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(40), 10160-10165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dedifferentiation of caudate functional connectivity and striatal dopamine transporter density predict memory change in normal aging
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 115, no 40, p. 10160-10165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Age-related changes in striatel function are potentially important for predicting declining memory performance over the adult life span. Here, we used fMRI to measure functional connectivity of caudate subfields with large-scale association networks and positron emission tomography to measure striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density in 51 older adults (age 65-86 years) who received annual cognitive testing for up to 7 years (mean = 5.59, range 2-7 years). Analyses showed that cortical-caudate functional connectivity was less differentiated in older compared with younger adults (n = 63, age 18-32 years). Unlike in younger adults, the central lateral caudate was less strongly coupled with the frontal parietal control network in older adults. Older adults also showed less "decoupling" of the caudate from other networks, including areas of the default network (DN) and the hippocampal complex. Contrary to expectations, less decoupling between caudate and the DN was not associated with an age-related reduction of striatal DAT, suggesting that neurobiological changes in the cortex may drive dedifferentiation of cortical-caudate connectivity. Reduction of specificity in functional coupling between caudate and regions of the DN predicted memory decline over subsequent years at older ages. The age-related reduction in striatal DAT density also predicted memory decline, suggesting that a relation between striatal functions and memory decline in aging is multifaceted. Collectively, the study provides evidence highlighting the association of age-related differences in striatal function to memory decline in normal aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2018
Keywords
striatum, aging, memory, dopamine, functional connectivity
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152873 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1804641115 (DOI)000446078700089 ()30224467 (PubMedID)
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR023401NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR019307NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR019254NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR023043Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Lövdén, M., Karalija, N., Andersson, M., Wåhlin, A., Axelsson, J., Köhncke, Y., . . . Lindenberger, U. (2018). Latent-profile analysis reveals behavioral and brain correlates of dopamine-cognition associations. Cerebral Cortex, 28(11), 3894-3907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Latent-profile analysis reveals behavioral and brain correlates of dopamine-cognition associations
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2018 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 3894-3907Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that associations between the neurotransmitter dopamine and cognition are nonmonotonic and open to modulation by various other factors. The functional implications of a given level of dopamine may therefore differ from person to person. By applying latent-profile analysis to a large (n = 181) sample of adults aged 64-68 years, we probabilistically identified 3 subgroups that explain the multivariate associations between dopamine D2/3R availability (probed with C-11-raclopride-PET, in cortical, striatal, and hippocampal regions) and cognitive performance (episodic memory, working memory, and perceptual speed). Generally, greater receptor availability was associated with better cognitive performance. However, we discovered a subgroup of individuals for which high availability, particularly in striatum, was associated with poor performance, especially for working memory. Relative to the rest of the sample, this subgroup also had lower education, higher body-mass index, and lower resting-state connectivity between caudate nucleus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We conclude that a smaller subset of individuals induces a multivariate non-linear association between dopamine D2/3R availability and cognitive performance in this group of older adults, and discuss potential reasons for these differences that await further empirical scrutiny.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Cognitive Performance, dopamine D-2/3 Receptor Availability, Heterogeneity, Latent Profile Analysis, older Adults, Working Memory
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153657 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhx253 (DOI)000449432200011 ()29028935 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 446-2013-7189Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2277Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationTorsten Söderbergs stiftelseRagnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Swedish Brain FoundationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Pudas, S., Josefsson, M., Rieckmann, A. & Nyberg, L. (2018). Longitudinal evidence for increased functional response in frontal cortex for older adults with hippocampal atrophy and memory decline. Cerebral Cortex, 28(3), 936-948
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal evidence for increased functional response in frontal cortex for older adults with hippocampal atrophy and memory decline
2018 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 936-948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The functional organization of the frontal cortex is dynamic. Age-related increases in frontal functional responses have been shown during various cognitive tasks, but the cross-sectional nature of most past studies makes it unclear whether these increases reflect reorganization or stable individual differences. Here, we followed 130 older individuals' cognitive trajectories over 20-25 years with repeated neuropsychological assessments every 5th year, and identified individuals with stable or declining episodic memory. Both groups displayed significant gray matter atrophy over 2 successive magnetic resonance imaging sessions 4 years apart, but the decline group also had a smaller volume of the right hippocampus. Only individuals with declining memory demonstrated increased prefrontal functional responses during memory encoding and retrieval over the 4-year interval. Regions with increased functional recruitment were located outside, or on the borders of core task-related networks, indicating an expansion of these over time. These longitudinal findings offer novel insight into the mechanisms behind age-associated memory loss, and are consistent with a theoretical model in which hippocampus atrophy, past a critical threshold, induces episodic-memory decline and altered prefrontal functional organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
aging, fMRI, hippocampus, longitudinal study, memory decline, prefrontal cortex
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131270 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhw418 (DOI)000426817600010 ()28119343 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-10 Created: 2017-02-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Salami, A., Rieckmann, A., Karalija, N., Avelar-Pereira, B., Andersson, M., Wåhlin, A., . . . Nyberg, L. (2018). Neurocognitive Profiles of Older Adults with Working-Memory Dysfunction. Cerebral Cortex, 28(7), 2525-2539
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurocognitive Profiles of Older Adults with Working-Memory Dysfunction
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2018 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 2525-2539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individuals differ in how they perceive, remember, and think. There is evidence for the existence of distinct subgroups that differ in cognitive performance within the older population. However, it is less clear how individual differences in cognition in old age are linked to differences in brain-based measures. We used latent-profile analysis on n-back working-memory (WM) performance to identify subgroups in a large sample of older adults (n = 181; age = 64-68 years). Our analysis identified one larger normal subgroup with higher performance (n = 113; 63%), and a second smaller subgroup (n = 55; 31%) with lower performance. The low-performing subgroup showed weaker load-dependent BOLD modulation and lower connectivity within the fronto-parietal network (FPN) as well as between FPN and striatum during n-back, along with lower FPN connectivity at rest. This group also exhibited lower FPN structural integrity, lower frontal dopamine D2 binding potential, inferior performance on offline WM tests, and a trend-level genetic predisposition for lower dopamine-system efficiency. By contrast, this group exhibited relatively intact episodic memory and associated brain measures (i.e., hippocampal volume, structural, and functional connectivity within the default-mode network). Collectively, these data provide converging evidence for the existence of a group of older adults with impaired WM functioning characterized by reduced cortico-striatal coupling and aberrant cortico-cortical integrity within FPN.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
dopamine, fronto-parietal network, functional connectivity, individual differences, working memory
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150747 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhy062 (DOI)000437165800025 ()29901790 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Rieckmann, A., Pudas, S. & Nyberg, L. (2017). Longitudinal Changes in Component Processes of Working Memory. eNeuro, 4(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal Changes in Component Processes of Working Memory
2017 (English)In: eNeuro, E-ISSN 2373-2822, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Working memory (WM) entails maintenance and manipulation of information in the absence of sensory input. This study investigated the trajectories and neural basis of these component processes of WM functions in aging. Longitudinal human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are presented from 136 older individuals (55–80 years) who were scanned at baseline and again 4 years later. We obtained evidence that age-related changes in parietal and frontal components of the WM core network are dissociable in terms of their role in maintenance of perceptual representations and further manipulation of this information, respectively. Individual difference analyses in performance subgroups showed that only prefrontal changes in fMRI activation were accompanied by changes in performance, but parietal brain activity was related to study dropout. We discuss the results in terms of possible neurobiological causes underlying separable aging-related declines in inferior parietal cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex that differentially affect WM functions.

National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132222 (URN)10.1523/ENEURO.0052-17.2017 (DOI)000397567900008 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRagnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rieckmann, A., Van Dijk, K. R. A., Sperling, R. A., Johnson, K. A., Buckner, R. L. & Hedden, T. (2016). Accelerated decline in white matter integrity in clinically normal individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging, 42, 177-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accelerated decline in white matter integrity in clinically normal individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease
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2016 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 42, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prior studies have identified white matter abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, cross-sectional studies in normal older individuals show little evidence for an association between markers of AD risk (APOE4 genotype and amyloid deposition), and white matter integrity. Here, 108 normal older adults (age, 66-87) with assessments of apolipoprotein e4 (APOE4) genotype and assessment of amyloid burden by positron emission tomography underwent diffusion tensor imaging scans for measuring white matter integrity at 2 time points, on average 2.6 years apart. Linear mixed-effects models showed that amyloid burden at baseline was associated with steeper decline in fractional anisotropy in the parahippocampal cingulum (p < 0.05). This association was not significant between baseline measures suggesting that longitudinal analyses can provide novel insights that are not detectable in cross-sectional designs. Amyloid-related changes in hippocampus volume did not explain the association between amyloid burden and change in fractional anisotropy. The results suggest that accumulation of cortical amyloid and white matter changes in parahippocampal cingulum are not independent processes in individuals at increased risk for AD.

Keywords
Aging, Amyloid, Diffusion tensor imaging, Longitudinal, White matter
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121543 (URN)10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.03.016 (DOI)000375129500019 ()
Available from: 2016-07-01 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Guitart-Masip, M., Salami, A., Garrett, D., Rieckmann, A., Lindenberger, U. & Bäckman, L. (2016). BOLD Variability is Related to Dopaminergic Neurotransmission and Cognitive Aging. Cerebral Cortex, 26(5), 2074-2083
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BOLD Variability is Related to Dopaminergic Neurotransmission and Cognitive Aging
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2016 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 2074-2083Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dopamine (DA) losses are associated with various aging-related cognitive deficits. Typically, higher moment-to-moment brain signal variability in large-scale patterns of voxels in neocortical regions is linked to better cognitive performance and younger adult age, yet the physiological mechanisms regulating brain signal variability are unknown. We explored the relationship among adult age, DA availability, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability, while younger and older participants performed a spatial working memory (SWM) task. We quantified striatal and extrastriatal DA D1 receptor density with [(11)C]SCH23390 and positron emission tomography in all participants. We found that BOLD variability in a neocortical region was negatively related to age and positively related to SWM performance. In contrast, BOLD variability in subcortical regions and bilateral hippocampus was positively related to age and slower responses, and negatively related to D1 density in caudate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, BOLD variability in neocortical regions was positively associated with task-related disengagement of the default-mode network, a network whose activation needs to be suppressed for efficient SWM processing. Our results show that age-related DA losses contribute to changes in brain signal variability in subcortical regions and suggest a potential mechanism, by which neocortical BOLD variability supports cognitive performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
Keywords
BOLD variability, cognitive aging, default mode network, dopamine, spatial working memory
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102512 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhv029 (DOI)000377469500019 ()25750252 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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