umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Fischer, A., Johansson, I., Blomberg, A. & Sundström, B. (2019). Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study. COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adherence to a Mediterranean-like Diet as a Protective Factor Against COPD: A Nested Case-Control Study
2019 (English)In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A diet rich in nutrients has been suggested to have protective effects against the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the traditional Mediterranean diet is high in nutrients, including antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, it is of interest to study as a protective factor against COPD. Our aim was therefore to study its associations with development of COPD using population-based prospective data from the Vasterbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) cohort. Data on diet from 370 individuals, who later visited the Department of Medicine at the University Hospital, Umea, Sweden, with a diagnosis of COPD, were compared to 1432 controls. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a modified version of the Mediterranean diet score (MDS). Cases were diagnosed with COPD 11.1 years (mean) (standard deviation [SD] 4.5 years) after first stating their dietary habits in the VIP at a mean age of 55.5 years (SD 6.6 years). Higher MDS was associated with a higher level of education and not living alone. After adjustment for co-habiting and education level, individuals with an intermediate MDS and those with the highest MDS had a lower odds of developing COPD (odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.95; OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.86, respectively). These results remained also after adjustment for smoking intensity, i.e., numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99; OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.97), respectively). To conclude, adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet seems to be inversely associated with the development of COPD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
COPD, dietary habit, Mediterranean diet, nutrients
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162857 (URN)10.1080/15412555.2019.1634039 (DOI)000481171500001 ()31405301 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2019-10-24
Sundström, B., Ljung, L. & Di Giuseppe, D. (2019). Consumption of dairy products and risk of rheumatoid arthritis among women: a population-based prospective cohort study. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 78, 1047-1048
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of dairy products and risk of rheumatoid arthritis among women: a population-based prospective cohort study
2019 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, p. 1047-1048Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Conflicting results have been reported regarding the association between consumption of milk and dairy products and the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between consumption of milk and dairy products and the development of RA in a large population-based cohort of women.

Methods: In a prospective cohort study 35,600 women aged 48-83 years, from the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC), were followed between 2003 and 2015. Consumption of dairy products was assessed in 1997 at a mean age of mean age of 61.5 years (SD 9.1 years) with a 96-item self-administered questionnaire. The risk (hazard ratio; HR) of RA development associated with consumption of dairy products was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models with adjustment for age, alcohol intake, smoking, energy intake, meat and fish consumption.

Results: During the follow-up of 12 years, 368 individuals were identified with a new diagnosis of RA. Comparing high consumption with low consumption of dairy products, no association between consumption of dairy products and the development of RA was observed: HR for the fully adjusted model=1.12 (95% CI: 0.78-1.59 (Table 1). Also when evaluating milk and cheese consumption separately, no association with the risk of RA was observed: HR for the highest milk consumption=1.10 (95% CI: 0.82-1.44) and highest cheese consumption HR=1.20 (95% CI: 0.81-1.79), compared with low consumption (fully adjusted models, table 1).

Conclusion: In this large population-based cohort study, consumption of dairy products was not associated with risk to develop RA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161725 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-eular.1187 (DOI)000472207103153 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Madrid, Spain, June 12-15, 2019
Note

Supplement: 2

Meeting Abstract: FRI0697-HP

Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved
Ångström, L., Hörnberg, K., Sundström, B., Wållberg Jonsson, S. & Södergren, A. (2018). Aerobic capacity is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic capacity is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis: a cross sectional study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Keywords
rheumatoid arthritis, aerobic capacity, subclinical atherosclerosis, body composition, cardiovascular disease risk
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164590 (URN)
Available from: 2019-10-24 Created: 2019-10-24 Last updated: 2019-10-24
Sundström, B., Ljung, L. & Wallberg-Jonsson, S. (2018). Exercise habits and C-reactive protein may predict development of spinal immobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Clinical Rheumatology, 37(10), 2881-2885
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise habits and C-reactive protein may predict development of spinal immobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis
2018 (English)In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 2881-2885Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To assess predictors for spinal immobility in a long-term clinical study of patients with AS, data from annual clinical measurements of spinal mobility in 54 patients (41 men, mean of age at end of follow-up 54.7 years) with ankylosing spondylitis were co-analysed with data regarding lifestyle factors as well as laboratory measurements from a previous cross-sectional study. Spinal immobility was graded on the basis of recently published age-, sex- and length-specific reference intervals. Exercise habits and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were independently associated with the development of subnormal spinal immobility (p = 0.019 and p = 0.021). In multiple regression models, approximately 25% of the spinal immobility could be attributed to disease duration (p ae 0.011), levels of hsCRP (p ae0.004) and exercise in leisure time (p ae 0.019). The mean concentration of hsCRP was 4.2 mg/L (range 0.2-8.4 mg/L) in the study cohort. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and physical activity at work were not associated with spinal immobility. The results indicate that exercise habits may have an impact in preventing the development of spinal immobility in AS independently of disease duration and inflammation. This corresponds well with the accumulated knowledge from long-term clinical experience among rheumatologists, health professionals and patients. Consequently, exercise should remain an important part of the non-pharmacological treatment and self-care for patients with AS. Furthermore, modest inflammatory activity, measured as a slightly elevated hsCRP concentration, appears to affect subsequent spinal immobility in AS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer London, 2018
Keywords
Ankylosing spondylitis, Biomarkers, Exercise, Physical activity
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152384 (URN)10.1007/s10067-018-4195-y (DOI)000444749500036 ()30022369 (PubMedID)
Funder
Norrbotten County CouncilVästerbotten County CouncilSwedish Rheumatism Association
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Di Giuseppe, D., Ljung, L. & Sundström, B. (2018). Meat Consumption and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Women: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Paper presented at 2018 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, October 19–24, 2018, Chicago, IL. Arthritis & Rheumatology, 70(S9), Article ID 203.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meat Consumption and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Women: A Population-Based Cohort Study
2018 (English)In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 70, no S9, article id 203Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Purpose: Mixed results have been reported for the association between meat consumption and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between red meat, particularly processed meat, and the risk of RA using data from a population-based cohort of women.

Methods: We prospectively followed 35,600 women aged 48-83 years from the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC), between 2003 and 2014. Meat consumption was assessed with a 96-item self-administered questionnaire in 1997. A corresponding questionnaire data from 1987 was available, enabling identification of long-term meat consumption. The relative risk (RR) of RA associated with meat consumption and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Multivariable models were adjusted for age, body mass index, educational level, physical activity, use of dietary supplements, energy intake, and smoking.

Results: During the 12 years of follow-up (381 456 person years), 368 new cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. Meat consumption was not associated with the development of RA in age-adjusted (RR=0.96 (95% CI: 0.69-1.32)) or multivariable adjusted (RR=1.08 (95%CI: 0.77-1.53)) models (Table 1). No association was observed either for consumption of type-specific meat, such as red meat (RR=1.08 (95% CI: 0.77-1.50)), processed meat (RR=0.84 (95% CI: 0.59-1.22)), or poultry (RR=0.88 (95% CI: 0.60-1.31)). , Women with a consistent long-term consumption of meat of >7 servings/week over a period of 10 years had no increased risk of RA, HR 1.19 (95% CI: 0.78-1.80), compared to women with a consistent consumption of <=4 servings/week.

Conclusion: In this large population-based cohort study, meat consumption, in total, by sub-types, or over time, was not associated with the risk of RA development in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153134 (URN)000447268900204 ()
Conference
2018 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, October 19–24, 2018, Chicago, IL
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Ljung, L., Sundström, B., Smeds, J., Ketonen, M. & Forsblad-d'Elia, H. (2018). Patterns of comorbidity and disease characteristics among patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study. Clinical Rheumatology, 37(3), 647-653
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterns of comorbidity and disease characteristics among patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 647-653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The knowledge of the development of comorbidities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is limited. The aim of this study was to analyse associations between AS disease characteristics and comorbidity and to evaluate patterns of comorbidities in patients with AS. Patients with AS, fulfilling the modified New York Criteria, were identified (n =3D 346, mean age 56 +/- 15 years, 75% men, 99% HLA B27 positive). Through a review of the patient records, data on disease activity parameters, laboratory results, disease manifestations, and diagnoses of any clinically significant comorbidity was obtained. Four categories of comorbidities of interest were identified: A. arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and valvular heart disease; B. atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic CVD; C. spinal and non-spinal fractures; and D. obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Associations between AS disease characteristics and comorbidities in categories were assessed in logistic regression models. Differences in proportions of comorbidities was analysed using two-sided chi-square. Age was associated with all four categories of comorbidities, and male sex with arrhythmias, conduction disorders, valvular heart disease, and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Early disease onset and long disease duration, respectively, were associated with arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and valvular heart disease. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome was associated with features of the metabolic syndrome. Patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease had an increased risk of most other comorbidities, similar to, but more pronounced than patients with arrhythmias, conduction disorders and valvular heart disease. Comorbid conditions motivate clinical awareness among patients with AS. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish preventive measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer London, 2018
Keywords
Ankylosing spondylitis, Comorbidity, Cross-sectional, Epidemiology
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146158 (URN)10.1007/s10067-017-3894-0 (DOI)000426714500010 ()29119482 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hörnberg, K., Sundström, B., Innala, L., Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. & Wållberg-Jonsson, S. (2017). Aerobic capacity over 16 years in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: relationship to disease activity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PLoS ONE, 12(12), Article ID e0190211.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic capacity over 16 years in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: relationship to disease activity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0190211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyse the change in aerobic capacity from disease onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 16.2 years, and its associations with disease activity and cardiovascular risk factors. Twenty-five patients (20 f/5 m), diagnosed with RA 1995-2002 were tested at disease onset and after mean 16.2 years. Parameters measured were: sub-maximal ergometer test for aerobic capacity, functional ability, self-efficacy, ESR, CRP and DAS28. At follow-up, cardiovascular risk factors were assessed as blood lipids, glucose concentrations, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), body composition, pulse wave analysis and carotid intima-media thickness. Aerobic capacity [median (IQR)] was 32.3 (27.9-42.1) ml O2/kg x min at disease onset, and 33.2 (28.4-38.9) at follow-up (p>0.05). Baseline aerobic capacity was associated with follow-up values of: BMI (rs = -.401, p = .047), waist circumference (rs = -.498, p = .011), peripheral pulse pressure (rs = -.415, p = .039) self-efficacy (rs = .420, p = .037) and aerobic capacity (rs = .557, p = .004). In multiple regression models adjusted for baseline aerobic capacity, disease activity at baseline and over time predicted aerobic capacity at follow-up (AUC DAS28, 0-24 months; β = -.14, p = .004). At follow-up, aerobic capacity was inversely associated with blood glucose levels (rs = -.508, p = .016), BMI (rs = -.434, p = .030), body fat% (rs = -.419, p = .037), aortic pulse pressure (rs = -.405, p = .044), resting heart rate (rs = -.424, p = .034) and self-efficacy (rs = .464, p = .020) at follow-up. We conclude that the aerobic capacity was maintained over 16 years. High baseline aerobic capacity associated with favourable measures of cardiovascular risk factors at follow-up. Higher disease activity in early stages of RA predicted lower aerobic capacity after 16.2 years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2017
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143932 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0190211 (DOI)000418651500042 ()29272303 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sundström, B., Ljung, L. & Wållberg Jonsson, S. (2017). Exercise habits and C-reactive protein are associated with long term spinal immobility in ankylosing spondylitis. In: : . Paper presented at Reumadagarna, Västerås, 13-15 september, 2017 (pp. 31-31). Stockholm: Svensk reumatologisk förening, 4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise habits and C-reactive protein are associated with long term spinal immobility in ankylosing spondylitis
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Svensk reumatologisk förening, 2017
Series
Reumabulletinen, ISSN 2000-2246, E-ISSN 2001-8061 ; 119
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
rheumatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140370 (URN)
Conference
Reumadagarna, Västerås, 13-15 september, 2017
Note

Abstract 27

Available from: 2017-10-08 Created: 2017-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-24
Jiang, X., Sundström, B., Alfredsson, L., Klareskog, L., Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S. & Bengtsson, C. (2016). High sodium chloride consumption enhances the effects of smoking but does not interact with SGK1 polymorphisms in the development of ACPA-positive status in patients with RA [Letter to the editor]. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 75(5), 943-945
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High sodium chloride consumption enhances the effects of smoking but does not interact with SGK1 polymorphisms in the development of ACPA-positive status in patients with RA
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, no 5, p. 943-945Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Rheumatoid Arthritis, Autoantibodies, Epidemiology
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121555 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2015-209009 (DOI)000375091500030 ()26903441 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-30 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sundström, B., Ljung, L. & Wållberg-Jonsson, S. (2016). Spinal mobility in long standing ankylosing spondylitis: application of newly developed reference intervals on clinical data. Paper presented at Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), London, England, June 8-11, 2016. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 75, 1290-1290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spinal mobility in long standing ankylosing spondylitis: application of newly developed reference intervals on clinical data
2016 (English)In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, p. 1290-1290Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2016
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
rheumatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140369 (URN)10.1136/annrheumdis-2016-eular.4390 (DOI)000401523106312 ()
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), London, England, June 8-11, 2016
Note

Supplement 2

Meeting abstract FRI0652HPR

Available from: 2017-10-08 Created: 2017-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7226-0969

Search in DiVA

Show all publications