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Westin, Kerstin
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Publications (10 of 121) Show all publications
Landby, E. & Westin, K. (2019). Att resa med barn medfunktionsnedsättning: En enkätundersökning om föräldrars upplevelser. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att resa med barn medfunktionsnedsättning: En enkätundersökning om föräldrars upplevelser
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2019. p. 24
Series
GERUM, ISSN 1402-5205
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160071 (URN)
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Ficko, A., Lidestav, G., Ní Dhubháin, A., Karppinen, H. & Westin, K. (2019). European private forest owner typologies: a review of methods and use. Forest Policy and Economics, 99, 21-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>European private forest owner typologies: a review of methods and use
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 99, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increasing diversity of non-industrial private forest owners (PFOs) in Europe has been recognized by policy makers and the forestry sector at large. Typologies of these owners have been developed to provide an understanding of the diversity of owners' attitudes, values, beliefs, management objectives and behaviour. We analyzed PFO typologies from 28 European countries published from 1985 to 2015 in peer-reviewed journals and grey literature with respect to 1) research approaches and methods used; 2) typology objectives and problems addressed; 3) policy and management recommendations given. Using an on-line questionnaire we asked the first authors of the most relevant publications to retrospectively assess 4) the use of their typologies in education, science and forest policy. Most of the 66 publications reviewed share the common objective of providing a better understanding of forest ownership. Typologies were also developed to address roundwood mobilization, delivery of public goods, forest management approaches, involvement in PFO associations and entrepreneurship. The most common methodological approach was quantitative where owners were grouped by k-means clustering into 2 to 6 types and labelled with various names. Most frequently used labels were Multiobjective owners, Recreationists, Investors, Farmers, Indifferent owners, Conservationists, Multifunctional owners and Self-employed owners. Policy implications remain vague. The typologies had mostly been used in teaching and occasionally by politicians, civil servants or stake-holders. Only a half of the typologies had a follow-up study or was updated over time by the authors. After decades of classifying PFOs, it seems necessary to explore the link between typologies and forest owners' overt behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Family forests, Landowners, Non-industrial, Policy instruments, Literature review, Classification
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144600 (URN)10.1016/j.forpol.2017.09.010 (DOI)000455990500003 ()
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, P. A., Westin, K. & Müller, D. K. (2019). Great expectations of studying abroad: Exchange students from Umeå University, Sweden. In: Michael Allison (Ed.), Exploring the opportunities and challenges of international students: (pp. 99-124). New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Great expectations of studying abroad: Exchange students from Umeå University, Sweden
2019 (English)In: Exploring the opportunities and challenges of international students / [ed] Michael Allison, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2019, p. 99-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to investigate students’ expectations and experiences when studying abroad. A group of outbound exchange students at Umeå University, Sweden, were surveyed before and after the experience of studying in a foreign country. The study is based on a panel of 57 students, who answered one questionnaire prior to leaving for studies abroad and another after six months when most had returned to Sweden. Overall, the students were satisfied with their stay abroad. While the findings are partly in line with previous studies – the students expected to develop their language skills, learn more about another culture, develop as a person, and use the experience as a merit in their future career – this study also showed that in some aspects their perception of studying abroad changed. Perceptions that changed between the questionnaires concerned courses not being offered at Umeå University, more courses being available abroad than at home, and change of environment; the students appreciated this change more than they had expected. Moreover, the willingness to work abroad after finishing the studies was assessed lower upon the return home after the time abroad. Swedish outbound exchange students can be characterized as participants in horizontal mobility, as they expect a foreign higher education institution (HEI) to be of similar quality as their home university, thus emphasizing personal development more than academic achievement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2019
Series
Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World
Keywords
outbound students, student mobility, experiences and expectations, follow-up, Sweden
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158999 (URN)978-1-53616-242-4 (ISBN)978-1-53616-241-7 (ISBN)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2019-08-23
Nordlund, A., Jansson, J. & Westin, K. (2018). Acceptability of electric vehicle aimed measures: effects of norm activation, perceived justice and effectiveness. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 117, 205-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acceptability of electric vehicle aimed measures: effects of norm activation, perceived justice and effectiveness
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 117, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study a model was applied on consumer acceptance of commonly implemented EV focused measures. The model is based on a norm-activation process as defined in the Value-Belief-Norm theory and the Norm-Activation Model. The study was based on a questionnaire survey study on three groups of car owners; conventional fossil fuel vehicle owners (CV, n = 312, owners of vehicles run on alternative fuels except electricity (AFVnon-electric, n = 386), and owners of some form of electric vehicle (EV, n = 494). The results indicate that activating a personal normative reasoning in people can have a positive influence on the level of acceptance of EV aimed policy measures. It is important that policy makers develop policies that are perceived as just and effective, which as a consequence are then more acceptable to citizens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Norm-activation, Beliefs, Transportation policy, Acceptability, Electric vehicle
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152533 (URN)10.1016/j.tra.2018.08.033 (DOI)000446151200016 ()2-s2.0-85052299450 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 37031-1
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Westin, K. & Holm, E. (2018). Do trees make people more rooted?: Private forest owners’ migration behavior. Forest Policy and Economics, 94, 11-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do trees make people more rooted?: Private forest owners’ migration behavior
2018 (English)In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 94, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forestland is a tangible asset, likely both indicating and creating attachment to the forest site for the owners. Forest ownership can both create and maintain a strong motive for developing the forest holding and its surroundings. Decisions made by non-industrial private forest (NIPF) owners can therefore be expected to influence population development in the local communities. This paper addresses forest owners' migration propensity, and whether forest ownership influences migration to and from the municipality where the forest holding is located. Comparing the non-forest owners to the group of local NIPF owners, we found that the latter are more sedentary. Forest owners living in their forest municipalities seldom move out – about a third annually compared to others in the same age group. When moving, about half of absentee forest owners select their forest municipality as their destination and thus become local forest owners. Although private forest ownership significantly contributes to population development in small, remote rural municipalities, policies for local and rural development rarely acknowledge the potential private forest owners represent for economic and population development in rural areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2018
Keywords
Private forest owners, Migration propensity, Population development, Rural development
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150340 (URN)10.1016/j.forpol.2018.06.003 (DOI)000440528900002 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-1702
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Holm, E., Westin, K. & Haugen, K. (2018). Place, kinship, and employment. Population, Space and Place, 24(3), Article ID e2118.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Place, kinship, and employment
2018 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 24, no 3, article id e2118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the magnitude and composition of kinship ties at Swedish workplaces. By analysing official register data and illustrating findings from interviews with HR personnel at different workplaces, the following questions are discussed: How much kinship concentration is there today on the labour market in a modern Western society such as Sweden? How is the kin‐based selection of workplace members structured by place? The study is based on an analysis of individually connected register information on all workplaces in Sweden in 2012. The number of individual links between relatives and couples at an average workplace amounts to 14% of the number of employees as derived from 310, 000 couples and pairs of relatives among 4.3 million workers. So, even today in Sweden, kinship is a common phenomenon observable for most workers at most workplaces. Of all such connected pairs of kin at workplaces, more than a third contain counterparts living in the same household. A non‐linear individual‐level regression reveals that population density in the vicinity of the workplace is substantially related to kin density. Large agglomerations seem to coexist with low kin density workplaces. Although some level of kin membership is unavoidable especially at workplaces in sparsely populated places, removing this part still reveals that kinship above an unavoidable level seems to exist. The study contributes to the discussion of kinship in workplaces by examining the magnitude and composition of kinship ties in the whole work force and complementing findings with interviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
kinship bias, kinship density, kinship ties, workplace
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143467 (URN)10.1002/psp.2118 (DOI)000429719900011 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Westin, K., Jansson, J. & Nordlund, A. (2018). The importance of socio-demographic characteristics, geographic setting, and attitudes for adoption of electric vehicles in Sweden. Travel Behaviour & Society, 13, 118-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of socio-demographic characteristics, geographic setting, and attitudes for adoption of electric vehicles in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688, Vol. 13, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the number of different types of EVs is increasing, they still constitute only a small share of the total vehicle market. There are a number of barriers to car owners' adoption of an EV: travel needs, charging infrastructure, the individual car owner's socio-economic characteristics, attitudinal factors, and environmental concern. In this study, the characteristics and geographic location of all private car owners in Sweden (N = 4,447,118) are charted. Through analysis of survey data (N = 1192), the importance of socio-demographic attributes, geographic conditions, car interest, personal and social norms, and environmental concern is estimated. Mapping EV ownership shows that, so far, EV adoption has mainly occurred in metropolitan areas and also to some extent in hotspots outside the metropolitan areas, and that these hotspots are tourist regions that may be exposed to EVs via, for example, Norwegian tourists in the Swedish case. Logistic regression analyses show that age and education level have positive impacts on EV ownership. Residential area also has an influence to some extent, pointing to a slight neighborhood effect in EV adoption. However, the most important factor influencing EV ownership is the individual's personal norms. In addition to showcasing EV adoption patterns in Sweden, the contribution of this study is to point to the importance of the attitudinal factor of personal norm even when geographical conditions and socio-demographic characteristics are controlled for. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Electric vehicle, Adoption, Socio-demographic attributes, Geographic setting, Norms, Attitudes
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152241 (URN)10.1016/j.tbs.2018.07.004 (DOI)000444461000010 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Nyman, E., Westin, K. & Carson, D. (2018). Tourism destination choice sets for families with wheelchair-bound children. Tourism Recreation Resarch, 43(1), 26-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tourism destination choice sets for families with wheelchair-bound children
2018 (English)In: Tourism Recreation Resarch, ISSN 0250-8281, E-ISSN 2320-0308, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 26-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Families with disabled children encounter a range of mobility constraints when travelling for tourism purposes, yet how such constraints affect their ultimate destination choices is currently not well understood. This paper applies a destination choice set model to explain how families with wheelchair-bound children with cerebral palsy choose their holiday destinations. Interviews with 13 parents revealed that these families find many destinations unavailable due to various mobility and travel constraints, such as inaccessible modes of transport and accommodations. The destination choices are trade-offs between constraints and desires of the disabled child and other family members. The findings suggest that the destination choice set model for this particular target group should also consider an ‘accessible set’ of destinations with universal design when exploring travel-related decisions of these families. Finally, the paper argues for a more differentiated approach towards identifying and responding to travel constraints of families with disabled children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
disability, travel constraints, destination choice set model, family vacation, mobility
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138326 (URN)10.1080/02508281.2017.1362172 (DOI)000435555800003 ()2-s2.0-85027891956 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Jansson, J., Nordlund, A. & Westin, K. (2017). Examining drivers of sustainable consumption: the influence of norms and opinion leadership on electric vehicle adoption in Sweden. Journal of Cleaner Production, 154, 176-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining drivers of sustainable consumption: the influence of norms and opinion leadership on electric vehicle adoption in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 154, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transportation accounts for a large and growing part of carbon dioxide emissions. With an increasing vehicle fleet worldwide private car use is becoming an acute problem in need of urgent attention and action. Policy interference and cleaner cars are not enough; alternative fuel vehicles such as electric vehicles need to be adopted by consumers as well. Previous research on pro-environmental consumer behavior and sustainable consumption has proven the importance of norms and pro-environmental attitudes. However, little research has focused on understanding interpersonal influence found influential in consumer behavior research relating to innovation adoption. Consumer opinion leading and opinion seeking are two such interpersonal influence attitudinal constructs that have not been empirically analyzed in relation to sustainable consumption and alternative fuel vehicles. The main aim of this study is thus to analyze the influence of a set of attitudinal constructs on electric and flexfuel vehicle adoption: personal norms, social norms, ecological attitudes, opinion leading, and opinion seeking. Data from a questionnaire survey on three groups of electric vehicle adopters and non-adopters is used (N=1,192). The results confirm the importance of personal norms, opinion leading and opinion seeking in the three groups also when controlling for socio-demographic factors. The main contribution of this study is that it shows the importance of both interpersonal influence and attitudinal factors as drivers for eco-innovation adoption. The study also contributes in showing that electric vehicle and flexfuel vehicle adopters differ in relation to non-adopters on several factors.

Keywords
Consumer behavior, interpersonal influence, sustainable consumption, eco-innovation adoption, flexfuel vehicles, electric vehicles
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Social Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
consumer behavior; sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133076 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.03.186 (DOI)000401201900018 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 37031-1
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-03-30 Created: 2017-03-30 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Nordlund, A., Schenk, T. & Westin, K. (2017). Forest Beliefs in an Urbanizing World: Views on and Usage of Forest Areas Among Persons with and Without a Migration Biography in Germany and Sweden. Society & Natural Resources, 30(2), 160-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forest Beliefs in an Urbanizing World: Views on and Usage of Forest Areas Among Persons with and Without a Migration Biography in Germany and Sweden
2017 (English)In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 160-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have shown that environmental values of inhabitants of urban areas differ to some extent from those of people living in rural contexts. In the light of increasing urbanization, it is sometimes argued that these differences are becoming even greater, as people are becoming more and more alienated from nature. In the context of a larger survey study on beliefs about forests and forest management among the general public in Germany and Sweden, the influences of people’s migration biographies on their patterns of forest usage, their environmental concerns about forests, and the expectations and values they ascribe to forests are explored. While previous findings on differences between urban and rural populations are confirmed, we also find variation within these groups depending on their history of moving between the two spatial categories. This study thus adds a dynamic aspect to the discussion on the urban–rural perspective on beliefs about forests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Beliefs, environment, forest management, Germany, migration, Sweden, urbanization
National Category
Human Geography Environmental Sciences Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126943 (URN)10.1080/08941920.2016.1238988 (DOI)000388600500003 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
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