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Brännlund, Runar
Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Carlén, O., Bostedt, G., Brännlund, R. & Persson, L. (2019). Gone fishing: The value of recreational fishing in Sweden. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gone fishing: The value of recreational fishing in Sweden
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Data from a unique nationwide recreational fishing survey in Sweden is used to estimate benefits of recreational fishing in Sweden, differences between regions and age groups, and how they relate to expected catch. The data targets the whole Swedish population, and as a consequence a large fraction of zero fishing days exists in the sample. To consider this, a zeroinflated Poisson model was used. Swedes fished around 16 million days in 2013, of which twothirds was spent on inland fishing, and one third was spent on marine and costal fishing. Expected consumer surplus per fishing day vary over the season, from about SEK 23 for winter fishing, to SEK 148 for summer fishing. The highest consumer surplus values are found among the youngest and the oldest age groups that were surveyed. Expected catch is an important determinant for number of fishing days, but catch increases mainly influence summer fishing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2019
Series
CERE Working Paper ; 2019:2
Keywords
Consumer surplus, Recreational fishing, TCM, ZIP-model
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157826 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Brännlund, R. & Karimu, A. (2018). Convergence in global environmental performance: assessing heterogeneity. Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, 20(3), 503-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergence in global environmental performance: assessing heterogeneity
2018 (English)In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 503-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines convergence in environmental/carbon performance by constructing a measure based on production theory, where production processes explicitly result in the production of two outputs; a good output (GDP) and a bad output (CO2). We use the derived measure to test the beta-convergence hypothesis for a panel of 94 countries. The results reveal evidence in support of beta-convergence in environmental, or carbon performance for the entire (global) sample and each of the sub-samples. The evidence points to a slower convergence rate for the high-income countries relative to low-income countries. Moreover, the rate of convergence does not vary with capital in the global sample, but does vary in the high-income sample, possibly reflecting differences in abatement cost induced by differences in the stringency of environmental regulation and enforcement. Additionally, we find evidence of a negative relation between environmental performance and fossil fuel share, both at the global level as well as at the middle and high sub-samples, which tend to vary with capital intensity. As such, the results conform to the results from studies on the dynamics of per capita emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Capital intensity, Convergence, Environmental performance, Fossil fuel price
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152279 (URN)10.1007/s10018-017-0203-8 (DOI)000444211100001 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Acar, S., Söderholm, P. & Brännlund, R. (2018). Convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions: implications and meta-analysis. Climate Policy, 18(4), 512-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions: implications and meta-analysis
2018 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 512-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a rich empirical literature testing whether per capita carbon dioxide emissions tend to converge over time and across countries. This article provides a meta-analysis of the results from this research, and discusses how carbon emissions convergence may be understood in, for instance, the presence of international knowledge spillovers and policy convergence. The results display evidence of either divergence or persistent gaps at the global level, but convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions between richer industrialized countries. However, the results appear sensitive to the choice of data sample and choice of convergence concept, e.g. stochastic convergence versus β-convergence. Moreover, peer-reviewed studies have a higher likelihood of reporting convergence in carbon dioxide emissions compared to non-refereed work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Carbon dioxide emissions, convergence, global climate agreements, per capita rule
National Category
Economics Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134776 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2017.1314244 (DOI)000426093300010 ()2-s2.0-85018800296 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Brännlund, R. & Lundgren, T. (2018). Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy. Journal of Forest Economics, 32, 84-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pricing forest carbon: implications of asymmetry in climate policy
2018 (English)In: Journal of Forest Economics, ISSN 1104-6899, E-ISSN 1618-1530, Vol. 32, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Using an integrated assessment model, we examine the implications of climate policies that do not fully recognize forest carbon. Specifically, we first investigate the impact of an asymmetric policy that recognizes carbon emissions from fossil fuels while fully ignoring forest carbon. Next, we investigate the relative importance of not recognizing emissions from a reduction in the stock of forest biomass compared to not recognizing sequestration from the growth of forest biomass. We show that asymmetric carbon policies lead to lower levels of welfare, as well as higher emissions and carbon prices. This occurs because the forest resource will be allocated inefficiently under these carbon policies. Broadly, we find that when the social planner does not account for emissions or sequestration from the forest, the planner will set bioenergy levels that are too high and afforestation and avoided deforestation levels that are too low. Our results further reveal that not recognizing forest emissions leads to larger welfare losses than not recognizing sequestration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Climate policy, Forest carbon, Carbon neutrality, Integrated assessment model
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151560 (URN)10.1016/j.jfe.2018.04.003 (DOI)000442663300007 ()
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Jansson, J., Pettersson, T., Mannberg, A., Brännlund, R. & Lindgren, U. (2017). Adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: Influence from neighbors, family and coworkers. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 54, 61-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: Influence from neighbors, family and coworkers
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 54, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last years, many governments have set targets for increasing the share of biofuels in the transportation sector. Understanding consumer behavior is essential in designing policies that efficiently increase the uptake of cleaner technologies. In this paper we analyze adopters and non-adopters of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). We use diffusion of innovation theory and the established notion that the social system and interpersonal influence play important roles in adoption. Based on a nationwide database of car owners we analyze interpersonal influence on adoption from three social domains: neighbors, family and coworkers. The results point primarily at a neighbor effect in that AFV adoption is more likely if neighbors also have adopted. The results also point at significant effects of interpersonal influence from coworkers and family members but these effects weaken or disappear when income, education level, marriage, age, gender and green party votes are controlled for. The results extend the diffusion of innovation and AFV literature with empirical support for interpersonal influence based on objective data where response bias is not a factor. Implications for further research, environmental and transport policy, and practitioners are discussed.

Keywords
Adoption, Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), Interpersonal influence, Neighbor effect, Diffusion of innovation theory
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economic Geography Social Psychology
Research subject
consumer behavior; marketing; sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135026 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.04.012 (DOI)000405976700005 ()881251-881253 (Local ID)881251-881253 (Archive number)881251-881253 (OAI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P11-0339
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Brännlund, R., Amin, K. & Patrik, S. (2017). Convergence in carbon dioxide emissions and the role of growth and institutions: a parametric and non-parametric analysis. Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, 19(2), 359-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Convergence in carbon dioxide emissions and the role of growth and institutions: a parametric and non-parametric analysis
2017 (English)In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 359-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines convergence of per capita carbon dioxide (CO2) emission for a panel of 124 countries taking into account the impact of economic growth and the quality of government institutions. The analysis builds on both parametric and non-parametric panel data techniques, and we examine the β-convergence hypothesis in a neoclassical growth model setting with institutional quality as one of the independent variables influencing both emissions and output growth. The results reveal evidence in support of β-convergence of per capita CO2 emissions for the global sample, and for the sub-samples comprising OECD versus non-OECD countries and high- versus low-income countries, respectively. There is, however, heterogeneity in β-convergence and it tends to vary with the level of the initial per capita CO2 emissions. We also report evidence of a negative direct effect of institutional quality on growth in per capita CO2emissions, especially for the global and high-income samples. However, institutional quality also promotes economic growth, thus generating a positive indirect effect on emissions growth. Overall the empirical results suggest a positive net effect of institutional quality on growth in per capita CO2 emissions in the global sample. Finally, the non-parametric approach reveals some evidence of bias in the parametric approach, in particular in the case of the estimates for the convergence parameter at either end of the distribution.

Keywords
Carbon dioxide emissions, Convergence, Institutional quality, Economic growth, Non-parametric approach
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123090 (URN)10.1007/s10018-016-0162-5 (DOI)000405834900006 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-27 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Karimu, A., Brännlund, R., Lundgren, T. & Söderholm, P. (2017). Energy intensity and convergence in Swedish industry: a combined econometric and decomposition analysis. Energy Economics, 62, 347-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy intensity and convergence in Swedish industry: a combined econometric and decomposition analysis
2017 (English)In: Energy Economics, ISSN 0140-9883, E-ISSN 1873-6181, Vol. 62, p. 347-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How to reduce the carbon footprint associated with energy use is still a major concern for most decision-makers. Against this background, a better understanding of energy intensity—the ratio of energy use to output and its convergence could be important in the design of policies targeting the reduction in the carbon footprint related to energy use. This paper analyzes the determinants of energy intensity and tests for energy intensity convergence across 14 Swedish industrial sectors. This analysis builds on a nonparametric regression analysis of an intensity index constructed at the industry sector level as well as indices constructed from a decomposition of this index. The latter isolates two key determinants of changes in energy intensity and convergence patterns: the ef- ficiency channel-fundamental improvement in the use of energy and activity channel-structural shifts in the economy. The empirical analysis relies on a detailed sectorial dataset covering the period 1990–2008. The findings indicate that input prices, including the price of energy, have been significant determinants of energy intensity in the Swedish industrial sectors. This effect can primarily be attributed to the efficiency channel and with a less profound influence from the activity channel. We also find evidence of energy intensity convergence among the industrial sectors, and this primarily stems from the activity channel rather than from the efficiency channel.

Keywords
Energy intensity, Convergence, Index numbers, Decomposition, Industrial sectors
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131567 (URN)10.1016/j.eneco.2016.07.017 (DOI)000397376200031 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Bostedt, G., Brännlund, R., Carlén, O. & Persson, L. (2016). Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: en konceptuell analys. Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fiskefria områden ur ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv: en konceptuell analys
2016 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Huvudsyftet med föreliggande rapport är att på ett övergripande och konceptuellt plan beskriva innebörden av en samhällsekonomisk nytto- och kostnadsanalys, eller samhällsekonomisk bedömning, och hur en sådan kan och bör genomföras för att analysera samhällsnyttan av fiskefria områden. Vidare syftar rapporten till att exemplifiera vilken typ av empiriska data och metoder som finns tillgängliga för en sådan analys med hjälp av den fritidsfiskeundersökning som årligen görs i regi av Hav och Vattenmyndigheten.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Department of Economics, Umeå University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 2016. p. 57
Series
CERE working paper ; 2016:7
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119760 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-26 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Brännlund, R., Nordström, J., Stage, J. & Svedin, D. (2016). Foreign ownership and its effects on employment and wages: the case of Sweden. IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, 5, Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign ownership and its effects on employment and wages: the case of Sweden
2016 (English)In: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, E-ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 5, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we study how foreign ownership of Swedish companies affects employment and wages. To study these effects, we specify a model based on the assumption that the Swedish labour market can be described as one where trade unions and employers bargain over employment and wages. Our hypothesis is that bargaining power is affected by institutional settings and the ownership of the firm. To test our hypothesis, we used a panel data set of 242 large Swedish manufacturing firms over the period 1980–2005. The results indicate no significant impact of foreign ownership on employment or wages in Sweden

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016
Keywords
Bargaining power, Trade union, Employment, Wages
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121679 (URN)10.1186/s40174-016-0058-1 (DOI)000379655300001 ()
Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Riera, P., García, D., Kriström, B. & Brännlund, R. (2016). Manual de economía ambiental y de los recursos naturales (3ed.). Paraninfo
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manual de economía ambiental y de los recursos naturales
2016 (Spanish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [es]

Difícilmente pueden entenderse muchos de los impactos que infringimos al medio ambiente, así como sus soluciones, sin comprender la relación entre economía y medio ambiente. Cómo usamos y cómo podríamos utilizar mejor los recursos, sean estos renovables o no renovables. En cuánto valoramos las personas la protección de determinados espacios naturales o hasta cuánto estamos dispuestos a invertir para gozar de agua de mejor calidad. Cuándo vale la pena construir una carretera a pesar de sus impactos ambientales o cuándo renunciar a ella. Qué consecuencias tiene el que unos países adopten leyes ambientales más estrictas y otros más laxas. En cuánto deberíamos penalizar a aquellas industrias que dañan nuestro entorno. Cómo podemos lograr que se emitan menos gases de efecto invernadero en todo el mundo sin que nos cueste demasiado. Estas son algunas cuestiones que nos pueden preocupar y a las que este manual de economía ambiental y de los recursos naturales puede ayudar a dar respuesta. Los autores, todos ellos doctores de economía y profesores de universidad especialistas en economía del medio ambiente, han trasladado a este libro su experiencia docente y de investigación para que los lectores puedan introducirse a la economía ambiental y de los recursos naturales sin requerir de conocimientos específi cos previos. El libro se dirige no sólo a economistas o estudiantes de economía interesados en el medio ambiente, sino también, y especialmente, a otros estudiantes, profesionales y personas con preocupación ambiental y deseo de conocer lo que la economía puede aportar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paraninfo, 2016. p. 339 Edition: 3
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123100 (URN)9788428398824 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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