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Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C.
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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Claeson, A.-S., Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Stenlund, H. & Johansson, A. I. (2019). A standardized protocol for comparable analysis of GSH/GSSG by UHPLC-ESI-MSMS for human plasma. Journal of chromatography. B, 1104, 67-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A standardized protocol for comparable analysis of GSH/GSSG by UHPLC-ESI-MSMS for human plasma
2019 (English)In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 1104, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variability in the levels of GSH and GSSG in plasma is suggested to derive from inadequate pre-processing methods. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for comparable and reliable measurements of GSH/GSSG. Venous blood from 8 healthy individuals were collected and divided into 7 different pre-processing procedures. For three of the samples an extraction mixture was added after 0 (baseline), 4 and 8 min and for three of the samples the extraction mixture was added at different times during defrost. A worst case scenario where a sample was left in a cool box during 6 h was also included. The samples were analyzed with UHPLC-ESIMSMS. A large difference in the levels of GSH and GSSG were identified and it was clearly associated with the sample handling procedures. A sample left untreated for 4 min will have significantly reduced amount of GSH. Stability tests showed that the level of GSH was reduced after 3 months in -80 degrees C.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
GIutathione, GSH, GSSG, Plasma, Sample pre-processing, UHPLC-ESI-MS
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156612 (URN)10.1016/j.jchromb.2018.11.007 (DOI)000456890000008 ()30445289 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1229Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-1110
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Danielsson, K. & Fowler, C. J. (2019). Changes in Proportions of Linoleic Acid-derived Oxylipins in Oral Lichen Planus. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 99(11), 1051-1052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Proportions of Linoleic Acid-derived Oxylipins in Oral Lichen Planus
2019 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 1051-1052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 2019
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164038 (URN)10.2340/00015555-3281 (DOI)000487762500025 ()31396636 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Alhouayek, M., Rankin, L., Gouveia-Figueira, S. C. & Fowler, C. J. (2019). Interferon γ treatment increases endocannabinoid and related N-acylethanolamine levels in T84 human colon carcinoma cells. Paper presented at 8th European Workshop on Cannabinoid Research, Roehampton, England, United Kingdom, 31 August - 2 September, 2017. British Journal of Pharmacology, 176(10), 1470-1480
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interferon γ treatment increases endocannabinoid and related N-acylethanolamine levels in T84 human colon carcinoma cells
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 176, no 10, p. 1470-1480Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose: Endocannabinoids and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are involved in regulation of gut function, but relatively little is known as to whether inflammatory cytokines such as IFN affect their levels. We have investigated this in vitro using cultures of T84 colon cancer cells.

Experimental approach: T84 cells, when cultured in monolayers, differentiate to form adult colonic crypt-like cells with excellent permeability barrier properties. The integrity of the permeability barrier in these monolayers was measured using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). NAE levels were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Expression of the enzymes involved in NAE and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) turnover were assessed with qPCR.

Key results: IFN treatment for 8 or 24h increased levels of both endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG) and the related NAEs. The treatment did not affect the rate of hydrolysis of either anandamide or palmitoylethanolamide by intact cells, and in both cases, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) rather than NAE-hydrolysing acid amidase (NAAA) was mainly responsible for the hydrolysis of these NAEs. IFN treatment reduced the TEER of the cells in a manner that was not prevented by inhibition of either FAAH or NAAA but was partially reversed by apical administration of the NAE palmitoylethanolamide.

Conclusion and implications: IFN treatment mobilized endocannabinoid and related NAE levels in T84 cells. However, blockade of anandamide or NAE hydrolysis was insufficient to negate the deleterious effects of this cytokine upon the permeability barrier of the cell monolayers.

National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159393 (URN)10.1111/bph.14135 (DOI)000466968400010 ()29313885 (PubMedID)
Conference
8th European Workshop on Cannabinoid Research, Roehampton, England, United Kingdom, 31 August - 2 September, 2017
Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Surowiec, I., Skotare, T., Sjögren, R., Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Orikiiriza, J. T., Bergström, S., . . . Trygg, J. (2019). Joint and unique multiblock analysis of biological data: multiomics malaria study. Paper presented at Conference on Challenges in Analysis of Complex Natural Mixtures, Univ Edinburgh, Edinburgh, MAY 13-15, 2019. Faraday discussions (Online), 218, 268-283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Joint and unique multiblock analysis of biological data: multiomics malaria study
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2019 (English)In: Faraday discussions (Online), ISSN 1359-6640, E-ISSN 1364-5498, Vol. 218, p. 268-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modern profiling technologies enable obtaining large amounts of data which can be later used for comprehensive understanding of the studied system. Proper evaluation of such data is challenging, and cannot be faced by bare analysis of separate datasets. Integrated approaches are necessary, because only data integration allows finding correlation trends common for all studied data sets and revealing hidden structures not known a priori. This improves understanding and interpretation of the complex systems. Joint and Unique MultiBlock Analysis (JUMBA) is an analysis method based on the OnPLS-algorithm that decomposes a set of matrices into joint parts containing variation shared with other connected matrices and variation that is unique for each single matrix. Mapping unique variation is important from a data integration perspective, since it certainly cannot be expected that all variation co-varies. In this work we used JUMBA for integrated analysis of lipidomic, metabolomic and oxylipin datasets obtained from profiling of plasma samples from children infected with P. falciparum malaria. P. falciparum is one of the primary contributors to childhood mortality and obstetric complications in the developing world, what makes development of the new diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as better understanding of the disease, of utmost importance. In presented work JUMBA made it possible to detect already known trends related to disease progression, but also to discover new structures in the data connected to food intake and personal differences in metabolism. By separating the variation in each data set into joint and unique, JUMBA reduced complexity of the analysis, facilitated detection of samples and variables corresponding to specific structures across multiple datasets and by doing this enabled fast interpretation of the studied system. All this makes JUMBA a perfect choice for multiblock analysis of systems biology data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156705 (URN)10.1039/C8FD00243F (DOI)000481497900014 ()
Conference
Conference on Challenges in Analysis of Complex Natural Mixtures, Univ Edinburgh, Edinburgh, MAY 13-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Karimpour, M., Bosson, J. A., Blomberg, A., Unosson, J., Sehlstedt, M., . . . Nording, M. L. (2018). Mass spectrometry profiling reveals altered plasma levels of monohydroxy fatty acids and related lipids in healthy humans after controlled exposure to biodiesel exhaust. Analytica Chimica Acta, 1018, 62-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass spectrometry profiling reveals altered plasma levels of monohydroxy fatty acids and related lipids in healthy humans after controlled exposure to biodiesel exhaust
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2018 (English)In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1018, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experimental human exposure studies are an effective tool to study adverse health effects from acute inhalation of particulate matter and other constituents of air pollution. In this randomized and double-blinded crossover study, we investigated the systemic effect on bioactive lipid metabolite levels after controlled biodiesel exhaust exposure of healthy humans and compared it to filtered air at a separate exposure occasion. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins, as well as endocannabinoids and related lipids, were quantified in plasma from 14 healthy volunteers at baseline and at three subsequent time points (2, 6, and 24 h) after 1 h exposure sessions. Protocols based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods were developed to detect temporal changes in circulating levels after biodiesel exhaust exposure. The exhaust was generated by a diesel engine fed with an undiluted rapeseed methyl ester fuel. Among the 51 analyzed lipid metabolites, PGF(2 alpha), 9,10-DiHOME, 9-HODE, 5-HETE, 11-HETE, 12-HETE, and DEA displayed significant responsiveness to the biodiesel exhaust exposure as opposed to filtered air. Of these, 9-HODE and 5-HETE at 24 h survived the 10% false discovery rate cutoff (p < 0.003). Hence, the majority of the responsive lipid metabolites were monohydroxy fatty acids. We conclude that it is possible to detect alterations in circulating bioactive lipid metabolites in response to biodiesel exhaust exposure using LC-MS/MS, with emphasis on metabolites with inflammation related properties and implications on cardiovascular health and disease. These observations aid future investigations on air pollution effects, especially with regard to cardiovascular outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Oxylipin, Endocannabinoid, Eicosanoid, Mass spectrometry, Rapeseed methyl ester, Inflammation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148622 (URN)10.1016/j.aca.2018.02.032 (DOI)000428798200008 ()29605135 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-303AFA Insurance, 130320
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, I., Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Ernerudh, J., Vrethem, M., Ghafouri, N., Ghafouri, B. & Nording, M. (2018). Oxylipins in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, 138, 41-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxylipins in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis
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2018 (English)In: Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, ISSN 1098-8823, E-ISSN 2212-196X, Vol. 138, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although oxylipins are involved in inflammation, data on these lipid mediators in multiple sclerosis are sparse. In this study, a panel of oxylipins were analysed swith liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 41 treatment naive patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and 22 healthy controls. CSF levels of 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE) and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (9-HODE median 380 nM (interquartile range 330-450 nM) in patients and 290 nM (interquartile range 250-340 nM) in controls, 13-HODE median 930 nM (interquartile range 810-1080 nM) in patients and 690 nM (interquartile range 570-760 nM) in controls, p < 0.001 in Mann-Whitney U tests). 9-HODE and 13-HODE performed well for separation of patients and healthy controls (AUC 0.85 and 0.88, respectively, in ROC curve analysis). However, baseline CSF levels of the oxylipins did not differ between patients with signs of disease activity during one, two and four years of follow-up and patients without. In conclusion, this study indicates that 9-HODE and 13-HODE levels are increased in CSF from CIS and RRMS patients compared with healthy controls, but does not support 9-HODE or 13-HODE as prognostic biomarkers of disease activity in patients during follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Oxylipins, Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, Mass spectrometry, Multiple sclerosis, Clinically isolated ndrome
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153141 (URN)10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2018.08.003 (DOI)000447481000006 ()30118859 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051681469 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Gouveia-Figueira, S., Martens, D. S., Nawrot, T. S. & Nording, M. L. (2017). Cord blood eicosanoid signatures and newborn gestational age. Paper presented at 6th European Workshop on Lipid Mediators (EWLM), SEP 27-30, 2016, Goethe Univ, Frankfurt, GERMANY. Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, 133, 123-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cord blood eicosanoid signatures and newborn gestational age
2017 (English)In: Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, ISSN 1098-8823, E-ISSN 2212-196X, Vol. 133, p. 123-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Beyond prostaglandins, the function of eicosanoids and other oxylipins in pregnancy and labor is poorly understood. In contrast to earlier work focusing on preterm infants, we investigated how oxylipin levels in newborns (measured in cord blood) vary during the last weeks of pregnancy in 190 mother-newborns (≥37 weeks of gestation) of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, Belgium. We found increased levels of PGE2 (p = 0.003), PGF (p = 0.042), 8,9-DHET (p = 0.037), 11-HETE (p = 0.034), and 15-HETrE (p = 0.008) associated with full term pregnancy compared to early term labor. Furthermore, late vs early term was associated with increased levels of PGE2 (p = 0.012) and TXB2 (p = 0.033), while late vs full term was associated with decreased levels of 14,15-DHET (p = 0.029), 11,12-DHET (p = 0.033), and 5-HETE (p = 0.045). To summarize, nine eicosanoids, derived via three enzymatic pathways, were significantly associated with gestational age. Eight of these were derived from arachidonic acid, and one from dihomo-γ-linolenic acid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Eicosanoids, Gestational age, Lipid metabolism, Mass spectrometry
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143948 (URN)10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2017.07.003 (DOI)000418729100017 ()28736329 (PubMedID)
Conference
6th European Workshop on Lipid Mediators (EWLM), SEP 27-30, 2016, Goethe Univ, Frankfurt, GERMANY
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, J., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Alhouayek, M. & Fowler, C. J. (2017). Effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha upon the metabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide in prostate cancer cells. PLoS ONE, 12(9), Article ID e0185011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha upon the metabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide in prostate cancer cells
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 9, article id e0185011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tumour necrosis factor a (TNF alpha) is involved in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, a disease where disturbances in the endocannabinoid system are seen. In the present study we have investigated whether treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells affects anandamide (AEA) catabolic pathways. Additionally, we have investigated whether cyclooxygenase- 2 (COX-2) can regulate the uptake of AEA into cells. Levels of AEA synthetic and catabolic enzymes were determined by qPCR. AEA uptake and hydrolysis in DU145 and RAW264.7 macrophage cells were assayed using AEA labeled in the arachidonic and ethanolamine portions of the molecule, respectively. Levels of AEA, related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), prostaglandins (PG) and PG-ethanolamines (PG-EA) in DU145 cells and medium were quantitated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) analysis. TNF alpha treatment of DU145 cells increased mRNA levels of PTSG2 (gene of COX-2) and decreased the mRNA of the AEA synthetic enzyme N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine selective phospholipase D. mRNA levels of the AEA hydrolytic enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase were not changed. AEA uptake in both DU145 and RAW264.7 cells was inhibited by FAAH inhibition, but not by COX-2 inhibition, even in RAW264.7 cells where the expression of this enzyme had greatly been induced by lipopolysaccharide + interferon. treatment. AEA and related NAEs were detected in DU145 cells, but PGs and PGE(2)-EA were only detected when the cells had been preincubated with 100 nM AEA. The data demonstrate that in DU145 cells, TNFa treatment changes the relative expression of the enzymes involved in the hydrolytic and oxygenation catabolic pathways for AEA. In RAW264.7 cells, COX-2, in contrast to FAAH, does not regulate the cellular accumulation of AEA. Further studies are necessary to determine the extent to which inflammatory mediators are involved in the abnormal endocannabinoid signalling system in prostate cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2017
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140467 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0185011 (DOI)000410859200126 ()28910408 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Häggström, J., Fowler, C. J. & Nording, M. L. (2017). Levels of oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related lipids in plasma before and after low-level exposure to acrolein in healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 121, 60-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related lipids in plasma before and after low-level exposure to acrolein in healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance
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2017 (English)In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, E-ISSN 1532-2823, Vol. 121, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oxylipins and endocannabinoids play important biological roles, including effects upon inflammation. It is not known whether the circulating levels of these lipids are affected by inhalation of the environmental pollutant acrolein. In the present study, we have investigated the consequences of low-level exposure to acrolein on oxylipin, endocannabinoid and related lipid levels in the plasma of healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance (CI), an affliction with a suggested inflammatory origin. Participants were exposed twice (60 min) to heptane and a mixture of heptane and acrolein. Blood samples were collected before exposure, after and 24 h post-exposure. There were no overt effects of acrolein exposure on the oxylipin lipidome or endocannibinoids detectable in the bloodstream at the time points investigated. No relationship between basal levels or levels after exposure to acrolein and CI could be identified. This implicates a minor role of inflammatory mediators on the systemic level in CI.

Keywords
Oxylipins, Endocannabinoids, Plasma, Human exposure, Acrolein, Chemical intolerance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136786 (URN)10.1016/j.plefa.2017.06.004 (DOI)000405763500009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010-1401
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gouveia-Figueira, S., Karimpour, M., Bosson, J. A., Blomberg, A., Unosson, J., Pourazar, J., . . . Nording, M. L. (2017). Mass spectrometry profiling of oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and N-acylethanolamines in human lung lavage fluids reveals responsiveness of prostaglandin E2 and associated lipid metabolites to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 409(11), 2967-2980
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass spectrometry profiling of oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and N-acylethanolamines in human lung lavage fluids reveals responsiveness of prostaglandin E2 and associated lipid metabolites to biodiesel exhaust exposure
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2017 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 409, no 11, p. 2967-2980Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The adverse effects of petrodiesel exhaust exposure on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are well recognized. While biofuels such as rapeseed methyl ester (RME) biodiesel may have ecological advantages, the exhaust generated may cause adverse health effects. In the current study, we investigated the responses of bioactive lipid mediators in human airways after biodiesel exhaust exposure using lipidomic profiling methods. Lipid mediator levels in lung lavage were assessed following 1-h biodiesel exhaust (average particulate matter concentration, 159 mu g/m(3)) or filtered air exposure in 15 healthy individuals in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover study design. Bronchoscopy was performed 6 h post exposure and lung lavage fluids, i.e., bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), were sequentially collected. Mass spectrometry methods were used to detect a wide array of oxylipins (including eicosanoids), endocannabinoids, Nacylethanolamines, and related lipid metabolites in the collected BWand BAL samples. Six lipids in the human lung lavage samples were altered following biodiesel exhaust exposure, three from BAL samples and three from BW samples. Of these, elevated levels of PGE2, 12,13-DiHOME, and 13-HODE, all of which were found in BAL samples, reached Bonferroni-corrected significance. This is the first study in humans reporting responses of bioactive lipids following biodiesel exhaust exposure and the most pronounced responses were seen in the more peripheral and alveolar lung compartments, reflected by BAL collection. Since the responsiveness and diagnostic value of a subset of the studied lipid metabolites were established in lavage fluids, we conclude that our mass spectrometry profiling method is useful to assess effects of human exposure to vehicle exhaust.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG, 2017
Keywords
BAL, BW, Lipidome, Air pollution, Bronchoscopy, Eicosanoid
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134210 (URN)10.1007/s00216-017-0243-8 (DOI)000398515900019 ()28235994 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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