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Cutas, Daniela
Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Cutas, D. & Gheaus, A. (2019). Paternal responsibility for children and pediatric hospital policies in Romania. In: Marian A. Verkerk, Hilde Lindemann and Janice McLaughlin (Ed.), What about the family?: practices of responsibility in care (pp. 100-108). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paternal responsibility for children and pediatric hospital policies in Romania
2019 (English)In: What about the family?: practices of responsibility in care / [ed] Marian A. Verkerk, Hilde Lindemann and Janice McLaughlin, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 100-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this brief text we look at one instance of how gender norms continue to inform institutional treatment of parents regarding care for children: specifically, at how the exercise of fathers' responsibilities for their children can be discouraged or altogether blocked. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
fatherhood, parental responsibility, children, childhood
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157880 (URN)9780190624880 (ISBN)9780190624910 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Smajdor, A., Cutas, D. & Takala, T. (2018). Artificial gametes, the unnatural and the artefactual. Journal of Medical Ethics, 44(6), 404-408
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial gametes, the unnatural and the artefactual
2018 (English)In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 404-408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In debates on the ethics of artificial gametes, concepts of naturalness have been used in a number of different ways. Some have argued that the unnaturalness of artificial gametes means that it is unacceptable to use them in fertility treatments. Others have suggested that artificial gametes are no less natural than many other tissues or processes in common medical use. We suggest that establishing the naturalness or unnaturalness of artificial gametes is unlikely to provide easy answers as to the acceptability of using them in fertility medicine. However, we also suggest that we should be cautious about repudiating any relationship between nature and moral evaluation. The property of being natural or man-made may not per se tell us anything about an entity’s moral status, but it has an important impact on the moral relationship between the creator and the created organism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
artificial gametes, naturalness, artefact
National Category
Ethics Philosophy Medical Ethics
Research subject
Ethics; Medical Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145512 (URN)10.1136/medethics-2017-104351 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2018-03-08 Created: 2018-03-08 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Cutaş, D. (2018). On Love. Analize – Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies (11), 5-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Love
2018 (English)In: Analize – Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies, ISSN 2344-2352, no 11, p. 5-15Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Keywords
love, family, friendship
National Category
Philosophy
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154751 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2018-12-30 Created: 2018-12-30 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Cutas, D. (2018). The composition of the family. In: Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder and Jurgen De Wispelaere (Ed.), The Routledge handbook of the philosophy of childhood and children: (pp. 191-201). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The composition of the family
2018 (English)In: The Routledge handbook of the philosophy of childhood and children / [ed] Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder and Jurgen De Wispelaere, Routledge, 2018, p. 191-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter starts with an exploration of what the family is in order then to move on to look at its parts. The family has been defined in terms of its form (e.g. a mother, a father, and their biological offspring) or its function (e.g. adults taking and/or sharing custodial responsibility for children). In both of these cases, children are a necessary ingredient for a unit to be called a family – but the chapter also briefly reviews proposals to extend the accolade of "family" to beyond child-rearing. From a perspective concerned primarily with family form, biological and more specifically genetic parents have been seen as those to whom children should be born, and by whom they should be raised. From a perspective concerned with family function, this is not necessarily the case. Lastly, the chapter looks at the relation between parents and the requirements that co-parenting may generate in this regard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Handbooks in Philosophy
Keywords
family, parents, children, genetic ties
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150260 (URN)9781138915978 (ISBN)9781351055987 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2018-07-29 Created: 2018-07-29 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Smajdor, A., Cutas, D. & Takala, T. (2018). Transgressing nature?: Ethics and artificial gametes.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgressing nature?: Ethics and artificial gametes
2018 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
artificial gametes, naturalness
National Category
Medical Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147391 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Cutas, D. & Smajdor, A. (2017). "I am your mother and your father!": in vitro derived gametes and the ethics of solo reproduction. Health Care Analysis, 25(4), 354-369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I am your mother and your father!": in vitro derived gametes and the ethics of solo reproduction
2017 (English)In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 354-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we will discuss the prospect of human reproduction achieved with gametes originating from only one person. According to statements by a minority of scientists working on the generation of gametes in vitro, it may become possible to create eggs from men’s non-reproductive cells and sperm from women’s. This would enable, at least in principle, the creation of an embryo from cells obtained from only one individual: ‘solo reproduction’. We will consider what might motivate people to reproduce in this way, and the implications that solo reproduction might have for ethics and policy. We suggest that such an innovation is unlikely to revolutionise reproduction and parenting. Indeed, in some respects it is less revolutionary than in vitro fertilisation as a whole. Furthermore, we show that solo reproduction with in vitro created gametes is not necessarily any more ethically problematic than gamete donation - and probably less so. Where appropriate, we draw parallels with the debate surrounding reproductive cloning. We note that solo reproduction may serve to perpetuate reductive geneticised accounts of reproduction, and that this may indeed be ethically questionable. However, in this it is not unique among other technologies of assisted reproduction, many of which focus on genetic transmission. It is for this reason that a ban on solo reproduction might be inconsistent with continuing to permit other kinds of reproduction that also bear the potential to strengthen attachment to a geneticised account of reproduction. Our claim is that there are at least as good reasons to pursue research towards enabling solo reproduction, and eventually to introduce solo reproduction as an option for fertility treatment, as there are to do so for other infertility related purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
solo reproduction, in vitro gametes, reproductive cloning, genetic account of reproduction, single parenting, motherhood, fatherhood
National Category
Ethics Medical Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117359 (URN)10.1007/s10728-016-0321-7 (DOI)000413812400005 ()26969575 (PubMedID)
Projects
Close Personal Relationships, Children and the Family: Ethical and Political Analysis against a Changing Background
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Cutas, D. (2017). Infertility, ethics, and the future: an exploration. In: Gayle Davis, Tracey Loughran (Ed.), The Palgrave handbook of infertility in history: approaches, contexts and perspectives (pp. 609-624). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infertility, ethics, and the future: an exploration
2017 (English)In: The Palgrave handbook of infertility in history: approaches, contexts and perspectives / [ed] Gayle Davis, Tracey Loughran, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 609-624Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter explores current and prospective reproductive technologies and some of their likely implications for reproductive and family ethics and policymaking. The technologies discussed include uterus transplants, mitochondrial transfer, ectogenesis, the development of in vitro gametes, and solo reproduction. The chapter considers the impact of these developments on the content of concepts such as 'infertility', 'mother', or 'father'. Another layer to this process of redefinition originates in ongoing socio-cultural changes that shift the focus in parenting from the way in which children have come into the world, to relationships within the family. Considering these scenarios beforehand can help to clarify some of the current challenges in defining and regulating infertility. The chapter therefore aims to raise a number of questions rather than provide answers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Keywords
Ethics, Family, Gender, Reproductive technology, State
National Category
Ethics History
Research subject
Ethics; History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139081 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-52080-7_31 (DOI)978-1-137-52080-7 (ISBN)978-1-137-52079-1 (ISBN)
Projects
Close personal relationships, children and the family
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hens, K., Cutas, D. & Horstkötter, D. (2017). Parental responsibility: a moving target. In: Kristien Hens, Daniela Cutas, Dorothee Horstkötter (Ed.), Parental responsibility in the context of neuroscience and genetics: (pp. 1-12). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental responsibility: a moving target
2017 (English)In: Parental responsibility in the context of neuroscience and genetics / [ed] Kristien Hens, Daniela Cutas, Dorothee Horstkötter, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Beliefs about the moral status of children have changed significantly in recent decades in the Western world. At the same time, knowledge about likely consequences for children of individual, parental, and societal choices has grown, as has the array of choices that (prospective) parents may have at their disposal. The intersection between these beliefs, this new knowledge, and these new choices has created a minefield of expectations from parents and a seemingly ever-expanding responsibility towards their children. Some of these new challenges have resulted from progress in genetics and neuroscience. It is these challenges that we focus on in this introduction and volume.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2017
Series
International library of ethics, law, and the new medicine, ISSN 1567-8008 ; 69
Keywords
Parental responsibility, Genetics, Neuroscience, Childhood, Parenting
National Category
Ethics Philosophy
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130150 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-42834-5_1 (DOI)978-3-319-42832-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-42834-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-12 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hens, K., Cutas, D. & Horstkötter, D. (Eds.). (2017). Parental responsibility in the context of neuroscience and genetics. Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental responsibility in the context of neuroscience and genetics
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Should parents aim to make their children as normal as possible to increase their chances to "fit in"? Are neurological and mental health conditions a part of children's identity and if so, should parents aim to remove or treat these? Should they aim to instill self-control in their children? Should prospective parents take steps to insure that, of all the children they could have, they choose the ones with the best likely start in life?

This volume explores all of these questions and more. Against the background of recent findings and expected advances in neuroscience and genetics, the extent and limits of parental responsibility are increasingly unclear. Awareness of the effects of parental choices on children's wellbeing, as well as evolving norms about the moral status of children, have further increased expectations from (prospective) parents to take up and act on their changing responsibilities. The contributors discuss conceptual issues such as the meaning and sources of moral responsibility, normality, treatment, and identity. They also explore more practical issues such as how responsibility for children is practiced in Yoruba culture in Nigeria or how parents and health professionals in Belgium perceive the dilemmas generated by prenatal diagnosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2017. p. 246
Series
International library of ethics, law, and the new medicine, ISSN 1567-8008 ; 69
Keywords
moral responsibility, genetics, neuroscience, children, parents, gender, epigenetics
National Category
Ethics Philosophy Medical Genetics Neurosciences Medical Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130073 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-42834-5 (DOI)978-3-319-42832-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-42834-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Cutas, D., Smajdor, A. & Hens, K. (2017). Procreative procrastination: the ethics of postponed parenthood. In: Dominic Stoop (Ed.), Preventing age related fertility loss: (pp. 141-156). Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procreative procrastination: the ethics of postponed parenthood
2017 (English)In: Preventing age related fertility loss / [ed] Dominic Stoop, Springer Publishing Company, 2017, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, there has been growing concern over the perceived tendency of women to postpone childbearing. In this chapter, we show that some of the responses to the phenomenon of postponed reproduction are deeply problematic. The question of whether it is accurate to construe later motherhood as postponement at all is far from clear. Moreover, public health messages tend to recommend earlier motherhood as a way of avoiding risks, but this is a crude oversimplification: reproduction involves risks whenever it is undertaken. The focus on risk calls into question some of the strategies intended to remedy postponement of parenthood. There is also the question of where men feature in these decisions: they are all but absent in the public health material and media debates. We consider whether technology could offer a solution to postponement of parenthood, whether there are any benefits to postponement, and finally, whether postponed parenthood could itself be seen as part of a broader trend towards neoteny (the delaying of maturity) in human evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2017
Keywords
postponed parenthood, postmenopausal mothers, public health, reproductive public health
National Category
Ethics Medical Ethics
Research subject
Ethics; Medical Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140108 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-14857-1_12 (DOI)978-3-319-14857-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-14856-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Close personal relationships, children and the family: ethical and political analysis against a changing background
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2013-1306
Available from: 2017-09-30 Created: 2017-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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