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diva2:1192989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence and human development: age-specific variations in presence and their implications for the design of life-enhancing interactive applications
2018 (English)In: PRESENCE 2018 Proceedings, International Society for Presence Research , 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the relatively unexplored topic of changes in the sense of presence corresponding to individual development from early childhood to old age. How does presence change over the lifespan and how can presence-modulating interactive environments be designed to accommodate the needs of different age groups in the light of these changes? To address these questions, we adopt an existing framework for theorising about relevant aspects of the sense of presence, emphasising the distinction between presence and absence based on attentional focus, and the role of presence as a link between intentions and actions. We explore changes in presence and absence over the course of the human lifespan, and in relation to various psychological and cognitive problems. This includes a consideration of the significance of age-specific changes in levels of consciousness, as revealed through patterns of waking, sleeping and dreaming. Finally, we explore the implications of our position for the design of interactive environments, especially as applied to psychotherapy, and to cognitive training and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society for Presence Research, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
media and communication studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145991 (URN)978-0-9792217-6-7 (ISBN)
Conference
PRESENCE 2018, 18th conference of the International Society for Presence Research (ISPR), Prague, May 21-22, 2018
Available from: 2018-03-25 Created: 2018-03-25 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Moller, H., Chignell, M. & Waterworth, J. (2018). Using the Senses to Make sense: From Aesthetics to Ethics. In: Mattthew Lombard et al. (Ed.), Proceedings of Presence 2018: 18th conference of the International Society for Presence Research (ISPR). Paper presented at Presence 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the Senses to Make sense: From Aesthetics to Ethics
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of Presence 2018: 18th conference of the International Society for Presence Research (ISPR) / [ed] Mattthew Lombard et al., 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Immersive multimodal media increasingly offer virtually realistic experiences, which can be harnessed for a wide variety of industrial, medical/psychological and recreational purposes. With special attention to notions of “reality” being a perceived and experienced world informed by our senses and actions across the lifespan, we review the fundamental scientific evolution of this multidisciplinary field. Using neuroscientific principles, in this panel we debate inherent value added and challenges of differing paradigms to consider in future health-care and educational endeavours.

Keywords
immersive media, virtual reality, inclusive design, ageing, cognition, wellbeing, health-care
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap; Psychology; health services research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147918 (URN)
Conference
Presence 2018
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Danielsson, K., Lindgren, H., Mulvenna, M., Nilsson, I. & Waterworth, J. (2017). Digital technology in healthcare and elderly care. In: : . Paper presented at Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017, Umeå, Sweden — September 19 - 22, 2017 (pp. 188-190).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital technology in healthcare and elderly care
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The focus of this ECCE 2017 panel is on digital technology in healthcare and elderly care. The discussion concerns the design of technology and the use of technology for health. 

National Category
Other Social Sciences Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144178 (URN)10.1145/3121283.3121425 (DOI)978-1-4503-5256-7 (ISBN)
Conference
Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017, Umeå, Sweden — September 19 - 22, 2017
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Waterworth, J. & Hoshi, K. (2016). Human-experiential design of presence in everyday blended reality: living in the here and now. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human-experiential design of presence in everyday blended reality: living in the here and now
2016 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book explores how our lives and social interactions have become split between two intertwined, but not integrated, realities: the physical and the digital. Our sense of presence in the here and now has become fragmented, and yet earlier design approaches reinforced the problem, rather than leading to improvements. The authors address these issues by laying out a new human computer interaction (HCI) design approach – human-experiential design – rooted in a return to first principles of how people understand the world, both consciously and unconsciously. The application of this approach to the design of blended reality spaces is described in detail. Examples and scenarios of designing them to overcome the problems inherent in a variety of mixed reality settings are provided.

Human-Experiential Design of Presence in Everyday Blended Reality will appeal to undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in interaction design, psychology, HCI and computer application studies, as well as practicing interaction designers and computer professionals. It will also be of interest to communication, media and urban design students, and to all readers with an interest in the technology-mediated future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016. p. 105
Series
Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1571-5035
Keywords
HCI, interaction, design, experiential, blended reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, presence
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
media and communication studies; human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114450 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-30334-5 (DOI)978-3-319-30334-5 (ISBN)978-3-319-30332-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, J. (2016). The effects of ICT based training on cognition and well-being among healthy older people. In: : . Paper presented at 23NKG2016 - 23rd Nordic Conference on Gerontology.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of ICT based training on cognition and well-being among healthy older people
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aim: Physical exercise can have a significant beneficial effect on mental health, and elderly fitness programs are a widely accepted approach to preventing frailtyMethods: We present the ELF@Home project, and report design insights and other results from user involvement in the project, as well as inputs from medical experts. ELF@Home is an example of a “Positive Technology’’ approach, exemplifying the application of technology to improve the quality of personal experience through structuring of activity and personal augmentation.Findings and conclusion: The project proposes the adoption of new technology into everyday life from the perspective of positive psychology, approaching this aim by designing devices and systems that are actually usable and desirable in supporting extended healthy living for this target population. In the presentation, we focus on our findings from the project and on possibilities for future work in this area.

Keywords
exercise, elderly, sensors, health measurement, activity
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
människa-datorinteraktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122837 (URN)
Conference
23NKG2016 - 23rd Nordic Conference on Gerontology
Projects
ELF@Home
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07
Waterworth, J., Waterworth, E., Álvarez, P., Gutiérrez, J., Carús, J. L. & Garcia, S. (2016). What do elderly users want and need from fitness technologies?: Findings from the ELF@Home project. In: Daniela Villani, Pietro Cipresso, Andrea Gaggioli, Giuseppe Riva (Ed.), Integrating technology in positive psychology practice: (pp. 104-126). Hershey, USA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do elderly users want and need from fitness technologies?: Findings from the ELF@Home project
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2016 (English)In: Integrating technology in positive psychology practice / [ed] Daniela Villani, Pietro Cipresso, Andrea Gaggioli, Giuseppe Riva, Hershey, USA: IGI Global, 2016, p. 104-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is well known that physical exercise has a significant beneficial effect on mental and physical health, and elderly fitness programs are a good and widely accepted approach to prevent frailty. In this chapter, we examine what elderly people actually want and need when it comes to technologies designed to support and encourage their physical fitness. We present the ELF@Home project as a case study, and report design insights and other results from user involvement in the project. User involvement is a key component of the approach and uses methods such as interviews, focus group meetings, early component and prototype tests with users, as well as inputs from medical experts. ELF@Home is a clear example of a "Positive Technology’" approach exemplifying the scientific and applied use of technology for improving the quality of personal experience through its structuring (by using a goal, rules, and a feedback system) and personal augmentation (to achieve multimodal and mixed experiences). The project proposes the adoption of new technology in everyday life from the perspective of positive psychology, approaching this aim by designing devices and systems that are actually usable and desirable in supporting extended healthy living for this target population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, USA: IGI Global, 2016
Series
Advances in psychology, mental health, and behavioral studies
Keywords
Elderly, Fitness, Physical Exercise, Sensor Technology, Personal Trainer, Successful Aging, User Involvement
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communications
Research subject
media and communication studies; human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109186 (URN)9781466699861 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ballesteros, S., Mayas, J., Prieto, A., Toril, P., Pita, C., Ponce de Leon, L., . . . Waterworth, J. (2015). A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7, Article ID UNSP 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up
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2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 7, article id UNSP 45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616)investigated the maintenance of training effects of 20 1-hr non-action video gametraining sessions with selected games from a commercial package on several agedecliningcognitive functions and subjective wellbeing after a 3-month no-contactperiod. Two groups of cognitively normal older adults participated in both the posttraining(posttest) and the present follow-up study, the experimental group who receivedtraining and the control group who attended several meetings with the research teamduring the study but did not receive training. Groups were similar at baseline ondemographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. Significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group had been previously found at posttest, in processing speed, attention and visual recognition memory, as well as in two dimensions of subjective wellbeing. In the current study, improvement from baseline to 3 months follow-up was found only in wellbeing (Affection and Assertivity dimensions) in the trained group whereas there was no change in the control group. Previous significant improvements in processing speed, attentionand spatial memory become nonsignificant after the 3-month interval. Training olderadults with non-action video games enhanced aspects of cognition just after training butthis effect disappeared after a 3-month no-contact follow-up period. Cognitive plasticitycan be induced in older adults by training, but to maintain the benefits periodic boosting sessions would be necessary.

Keywords
brain platicity, cognitive aging, Clinical Trails, non-action video games, wellbeing
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
media and communication studies; human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101159 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2015.00045 (DOI)000353908900001 ()
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ballesteros, S., Prieto, A., Mayas, J., Pilar, T., Ponce De León Romero, L., Reales, J. M. & Waterworth, J. (2015). Corrigendum: brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7, Article ID 82.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrigendum: brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial
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2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 7, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
attention, cross-modal oddball attention task, cognitive aging, non-action video games, Training Support
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology Geriatrics Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
human-computer interaction; media and communication studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102641 (URN)10.3389/fnagi.2015.00082 (DOI)000357379900001 ()
Note

A corrigendum on Brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial By Ballesteros, S., Prieto, A., Mayas, and Waterworth, J. Front. Aging Neurosci. (2014) 6:277. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00277

Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Riva, G., Mantovani, F., Lindh Waterworth, E. & Waterworth, J. A. (2015). Intention, action, self and other: an evolutionary model of presence. In: Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz (Ed.), Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology (pp. 73-99). New York: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intention, action, self and other: an evolutionary model of presence
2015 (English)In: Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology / [ed] Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz, New York: Springer, 2015, p. 73-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The term "presence" entered in the wide scientific debate in 1992 when Sheridan and Furness used it in the title of a new journal dedicated to the study of virtual reality systems and teleoperations: Presence, Teleoperators and Virtual Environments. Following this approach, the term "presence" has been used to describe a widely re-ported sensation experienced during the use of virtual reality. The main limitation of this vision is what is not said. What is presence for? Is it a specific cognitive process? To answer to these questions, a second group of researchers considers presence as a broad psychological phenomenon, not necessarily linked to the experience of a medium, whose goal is the control of the individual and social activity. In this chapter we support this second vision, starting from the following broad statements: (a) the psychology of presence is related to human action and its organization in the environment; (b) the psychology of presence is related to the body and to the embodiment process; (c) presence is an evolved process related to the understanding and management of the causal texture of both the physical and social worlds. In the following paragraphs we will justify these claims and underline their relevance for the design and usage of interactive technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2015
Keywords
evolutionary psychology, active theory, presence, action, intentionality, self, consciousness
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
media and communication studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97706 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10190-3_5 (DOI)978-3-319-10189-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-10190-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, J., Lindh Waterworth, E., Riva, G. & Mantovani, F. (2015). Presence: form, content and consciousness. In: Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz (Ed.), Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology (pp. 35-58). Springer-Verlag New York
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence: form, content and consciousness
2015 (English)In: Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology / [ed] Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 35-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2015
Keywords
Evolution, consciousness, embodiment, self, psychology, psychotherapy, synesthesia, measurement, action, brain, imagination, imagery, form, content, attention, augmented reality, communication & technology, human-computer interaction (HCI), teleprescence, virtual reality
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
media and communication studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97705 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10190-3_3 (DOI)978-3-319-10189-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-10190-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9419-0682

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