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Donat-Vargas, C., Bergdahl, I. A., Tornevi, A., Wennberg, M., Sommar, J., Koponen, J., . . . Åkesson, A. (2019). Associations between repeated measure of plasma perfluoroalkyl substances and cardiometabolic risk factors. Environment International, 124, 58-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between repeated measure of plasma perfluoroalkyl substances and cardiometabolic risk factors
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 124, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are persistent synthetic chemicals that may affect components of metabolic risk through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor but epidemiological data remain scarce and inconsistent.

Objective: To estimate associations between repeated measurements of the main PFAS in plasma and total cholesterol, triglycerides and hypertension among the control subjects from a population-based nested case-control study on diabetes type 2 in middle-aged women and men.

Methods: Participants (n = 187) were free of diabetes at both baseline and follow-up visits to the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, 10 years apart: during 1990 to 2003 (baseline) and 2001 to 2013 (follow-up). Participants left blood samples, completed questionnaires on diet and lifestyle factors, and underwent medical examinations, including measurement of blood pressure. PFAS and lipids were later determined in stored plasma samples. Associations for the repeated measurements were assessed using generalized estimating equations.

Results: Six PFAS exceeded the limit of quantitation. Repeated measures of PFAS in plasma, cardiometabolic risk factors and confounders, showed an average decrease of triglycerides from −0.16 mmol/l (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.33, 0.02 for PFOA) to −0.26 mmol/l (95% CI: −0.50, −0.08 for PFOS), when comparing the highest tertile of PFAS plasma levels with the lowest. Associations based on average PFAS measurements and follow-up triglycerides revealed similar inverse associations, although attenuated. The estimates for cholesterol and hypertension were inconsistent and with few exception non-significant.

Conclusions: This study found inverse associations between PFAS and triglycerides, but did not support any clear link with either cholesterol or hypertension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cardiometabolic risk factors, Environmental epidemiology, Hypertension, Lipids, Plasma perfluoroalkyl substances, Prospective assessment, Repeated measurements
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156228 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.01.007 (DOI)000457122700007 ()30639908 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059696116 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Västerbotten County CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2017-00822
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Gaudet, M. M., Deubler, E. L., Kelly, R. S., Diver, W. R., Teras, L. R., Hodge, J. M., . . . Kyrtopoulos, S. A. (2019). Blood Levels of Cadmium and Lead in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk in Three Prospective Cohorts.. International Journal of Cancer, 144(5), 1010-1016
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood Levels of Cadmium and Lead in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk in Three Prospective Cohorts.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 5, p. 1010-1016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cadmium and lead have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, their associations with breast cancer risk are unknown despite their persistence in the environment and ubiquitous human exposure. We examined associations of circulating levels of cadmium and lead with breast cancer risk in three case-control studies nested within the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) LifeLink Cohort, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition - Italy (EPIC-Italy), and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS) cohorts. Metal levels were measured in stored erythrocytes from 1,435 cases and 1,433 controls using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random-effects models with each study result weighted by the within- and between-study variances. I2 values were calculated to estimate proportion of between study variation. Using common cut-points, cadmium levels were not associated with breast cancer risk in the CPS-II cohort (continuous RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.76 - 1.34), but were inversely associated with risk in the EPIC- Italy (continuous RR=0.80, 95% CI 0.61 - 1.03) and NSHDS cohorts (continuous RR=0.73, 95% CI 0.54 - 0.97). The inverse association was also evident in the meta-analysis (continuous RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.69 - 1.01) with low between-study heterogeneity. Large differences in lead level distributions precluded a meta-analysis of their association with breast cancer risk; no associations were found in the three studies. Adult cadmium and lead levels were not associated with higher risk of breast cancer in our large meta-analysis. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
breast cancer, cadmium, lead
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152113 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31805 (DOI)000455041700009 ()30117163 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Espín-Pérez, A., Hebels, D. G. A., Kiviranta, H., Rantakokko, P., Georgiadis, P., Botsivali, M., . . . de Kok, T. M. C. (2019). Identification of Sex-Specific Transcriptome Responses to Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 746.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of Sex-Specific Transcriptome Responses to Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PCBs are classified as xenoestrogens and carcinogens and their health risks may be sex-specific. To identify potential sex-specific responses to PCB-exposure we established gene expression profiles in a population study subdivided into females and males. Gene expression profiles were determined in a study population consisting of 512 subjects from the EnviroGenomarkers project, 217 subjects who developed lymphoma and 295 controls were selected in later life. We ran linear mixed models in order to find associations between gene expression and exposure to PCBs, while correcting for confounders, in particular distribution of white blood cells (WBC), as well as random effects. The analysis was subdivided according to sex and development of lymphoma in later life. The changes in gene expression as a result of exposure to the six studied PCB congeners were sex- and WBC type specific. The relatively large number of genes that are significantly associated with PCB-exposure in the female subpopulation already indicates different biological response mechanisms to PCBs between the two sexes. The interaction analysis between different PCBs and WBCs provides only a small overlap between sexes. In males, cancer-related pathways and in females immune system-related pathways are identified in association with PCBs and WBCs. Future lymphoma cases and controls for both sexes show different responses to the interaction of PCBs with WBCs, suggesting a role of the immune system in PCB-related cancer development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Medical Genetics
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155826 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-37449-y (DOI)000456554600185 ()30679748 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Gasull, M., Pumarega, J., Kiviranta, H., Rantakokko, P., Raaschou-Nielsen, O., Bergdahl, I., . . . Porta, M. (2019). Methodological issues in a prospective study on plasma concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and pancreatic cancer risk within the EPIC cohort. Environmental Research, 169, 417-433, Article ID S0013-9351(18)30609-1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methodological issues in a prospective study on plasma concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and pancreatic cancer risk within the EPIC cohort
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 169, p. 417-433, article id S0013-9351(18)30609-1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The use of biomarkers of environmental exposure to explore new risk factors for pancreatic cancer presents clinical, logistic, and methodological challenges that are also relevant in research on other complex diseases.

OBJECTIVES: First, to summarize the main design features of a prospective case-control study -nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort- on plasma concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and pancreatic cancer risk. And second, to assess the main methodological challenges posed by associations among characteristics and habits of study participants, fasting status, time from blood draw to cancer diagnosis, disease progression bias, basis of cancer diagnosis, and plasma concentrations of lipids and POPs. Results from etiologic analyses on POPs and pancreatic cancer risk, and other analyses, will be reported in future articles.

METHODS: Study subjects were 1533 participants (513 cases and 1020 controls matched by study centre, sex, age at blood collection, date and time of blood collection, and fasting status) enrolled between 1992 and 2000. Plasma concentrations of 22 POPs were measured by gas chromatography - triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). To estimate the magnitude of the associations we calculated multivariate-adjusted odds ratios by unconditional logistic regression, and adjusted geometric means by General Linear Regression Models.

RESULTS: There were differences among countries in subjects' characteristics (as age, gender, smoking, lipid and POP concentrations), and in study characteristics (as time from blood collection to index date, year of last follow-up, length of follow-up, basis of cancer diagnosis, and fasting status). Adjusting for centre and time of blood collection, no factors were significantly associated with fasting status. Plasma concentrations of lipids were related to age, body mass index, fasting, country, and smoking. We detected and quantified 16 of the 22 POPs in more than 90% of individuals. All 22 POPs were detected in some participants, and the smallest number of POPs detected in one person was 15 (median, 19) with few differences by country. The highest concentrations were found for p,p'-DDE, PCBs 153 and 180 (median concentration: 3371, 1023, and 810 pg/mL, respectively). We assessed the possible occurrence of disease progression bias (DPB) in eight situations defined by lipid and POP measurements, on one hand, and by four factors: interval from blood draw to index date, tumour subsite, tumour stage, and grade of differentiation, on the other. In seven of the eight situations results supported the absence of DPB.

CONCLUSIONS: The coexistence of differences across study centres in some design features and participant characteristics is of relevance to other multicentre studies. Relationships among subjects' characteristics and among such characteristics and design features may play important roles in the forthcoming analyses on the association between plasma concentrations of POPs and pancreatic cancer risk.

Keywords
Biomarkers, methods, Disease progression bias, Environmental epidemiology, Lipids, Pancreatic cancer, Persistent organic pollutants
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154577 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2018.11.027 (DOI)30529143 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Donat-Vargas, C., Bergdahl, I., Tornevi, A., Wennberg, M., Sommar, J., Kiviranta, H., . . . Akesson, A. (2019). Perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of type II diabetes: A prospective nested case-control study. Environment International, 123, 390-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of type II diabetes: A prospective nested case-control study
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 123, p. 390-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have drawn much attention due to bioaccumulation potential and their current omnipresence in human blood. We assessed whether plasma PFAS, suspected to induce endocrine-disrupting effects, were prospectively associated with clinical type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk.

Methods: We established a nested case-control study within the Swedish prospective population-based Västerbotten Intervention Programme cohort. Several PFAS were measured in plasma from a subset of 124 case-control pairs at baseline (during 1990–2003) and at 10-year follow-up. T2D cases were matched (1:1) according to gender, age and sample date with participants without T2D (controls).

Conditional logistic regressions were used to prospectively assess risk of T2D by baseline PFAS plasma concentrations. Associations between long-term PFAS plasma levels (mean of baseline and follow-up) and insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA2-B%) at follow-up were prospectively explored among 178 and 181 controls, respectively, by multivariable linear regressions.

Results: After adjusting for gender, age, sample year, diet and body mass index, the odds ratio of T2D for the sum of PFAS (Σ z-score PFAS) was 0.52 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.20, 1.36), comparing third with first tertile; and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.00) per one standard deviation increment of sum of log-transformed PFAS. Among the controls, the adjusted β of HOMA2-IR and HOMA-B% for the sum of PFAS were −0.26 (95% CI: −0.52, −0.01) and −9.61 (95% CI: −22.60, 3.39) respectively comparing third with first tertile.

Conclusions: This prospective nested case-control study yielded overall inverse associations between individual PFAS and risk of T2D, although mostly non-significant. Among participants without T2D, long-term PFAS exposure was prospectively associated with lower insulin resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Environmental contaminants, Plasma perfluoroalkyl substances, Environmental risk factors, Diabetes, Insulin resistance, Endocrine disruption, Environmental epidemiology, Nested case-control study, Prospective assessment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155947 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.026 (DOI)000455532500044 ()30622063 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Västerbotten County Council, 2017-00822Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Berger, E., Delpierre, C., Hosnijeh, F. S., Kelly-Irving, M., Portengen, L., Bergdahl, I., . . . Castagné, R. (2018). Association between low-grade inflammation and Breast cancer and B-cell Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: findings from two prospective cohorts. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 10805.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between low-grade inflammation and Breast cancer and B-cell Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: findings from two prospective cohorts
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 10805Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic inflammation may be involved in cancer development and progression. Using 28 inflammatory-related proteins collected from prospective blood samples from two case-control studies nested in the Italian component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (n = 261) and in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (n = 402), we tested the hypothesis that an inflammatory score is associated with breast cancer (BC) and.-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-cell NHL, including 68 multiple myeloma cases) onset. We modelled the relationship between this inflammatory score and the two cancers studied: (BC and B-cell NHL) using generalised linear models, and assessed, through adjustments the role of behaviours and lifestyle factors. Analyses were performed by cancer types pooling both populations, and stratified by cohorts, and time to diagnosis. Our results suggested a lower inflammatory score in B-cell NHL cases (β = -1.28, p = 0.012), and, to lesser, extent with BC (β= -0.96, p = 0.33) compared to controls, mainly driven by cancer cases diagnosed less than 6 years after enrolment. These associations were not affected by subsequent adjustments for potential intermediate confounders, notably behaviours. Sensitivity analyses indicated that our findings were not affected by the way the inflammatory score was calculated. These observations call for further studies involving larger populations, larger variety of cancer types and repeated measures of larger panel of inflammatory markers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150362 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-29041-1 (DOI)000438850900015 ()30018397 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050189913 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-10 Created: 2018-08-10 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Shirdel, M., Sommar, J. N., Andersson, B. M., Bergdahl, I. A., Wingfors, H. & Liljelind, I. E. (2018). Choosing the number of images and image position when analysing the UNC Passive Aerosol Sampler for occupational exposure assessment. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 15(11), 767-772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choosing the number of images and image position when analysing the UNC Passive Aerosol Sampler for occupational exposure assessment
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 767-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The University of North Carolina passive aerosol sampler (UNC sampler) could be an alternative when measuring occupational dust exposure, but the time required for microscopic imaging of the sampler needs to be reduced to make it more attractive. The aims of this study were to 1) characterise the effect on precision when reducing imaging, in order to shorten analysis time and 2) assess if the position of the images makes a difference. Eighty-eight samplers were deployed in different locations of an open pit mine. Sixty images were captured for each UNC sampler, covering 51% of its collection surface, using scanning electron microscopy. Bootstrapped samples were generated with different image combinations, to assess the within-sampler coefficient of variation (CVws) for different numbers of images. In addition, the particle concentration relative to the distance from the centre of the sampler was studied. Reducing the number of images collected from the UNC sampler led to up to 8.3% CVws for ten images when calculating respirable fraction. As the overall CV has previously been assessed to 36%, the additional contribution becomes minimal, increasing the overall CV to 37%. The mean concentrations of the images were modestly related to distance from the centre of the sampler. The CVws changed from 8.26% to 8.13% for ten images when applying rules for the image collection based on distance. Thus, the benefit of these rules on the precision is small and the images can therefore be chosen at random. In conclusion, reducing the number of images analysed from 60 to 10, corresponding to a reduction of the imaged sampling area from 51% to 8.5%, results in a negligible loss in precision for respirable fraction dust measurements in occupational environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Dust particles, PM10, PM2.5, occupational hygienist, passive sampling, respirable fraction
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152114 (URN)10.1080/15459624.2018.1508875 (DOI)000451621900002 ()30111275 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Campanella, G., Gunter, M. J., Polidoro, S., Krogh, V., Palli, D., Panico, S., . . . Chadeau-Hyam, M. (2018). Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases. International Journal of Obesity, 42(12), 2022-2035
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction. Methods DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waistheight ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population. Results We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P=9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P=6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P=5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P=1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P<1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P<1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors. Conclusion Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154848 (URN)10.1038/s41366-018-0064-7 (DOI)000452830800009 ()29713043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046105580 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 232997
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Campanella, G., Gunter, M. J., Polidoro, S., Krogh, V., Palli, D., Panico, S., . . . Chadeau-Hyam, M. (2018). Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases. International Journal of Obesity, 42(12), 2022-2035
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenome-wide association study of adiposity and future risk of obesity-related diseases
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2022-2035Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for several common chronic diseases such as breast and colorectal cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; however, the biological basis for these relationships is not fully understood. To explore the association of obesity with these conditions, we investigated peripheral blood leucocyte (PBL) DNA methylation markers for adiposity and their contribution to risk of incident breast and colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction.

Methods: DNA methylation profiles (Illumina Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) from 1941 individuals from four population-based European cohorts were analysed in relation to body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip and waist-height ratio within a meta-analytical framework. In a subset of these individuals, data on genome-wide gene expression level, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism were also available. Validation of methylation markers associated with all adiposity measures was performed in 358 individuals. Finally, we investigated the association of obesity-related methylation marks with breast, colorectal cancer and myocardial infarction within relevant subsets of the discovery population.

Results: We identified 40 CpG loci with methylation levels associated with at least one adiposity measure. Of these, one CpG locus (cg06500161) in ABCG1 was associated with all four adiposity measures (P = 9.07×10−8 to 3.27×10−18) and lower transcriptional activity of the full-length isoform of ABCG1 (P = 6.00×10−7), higher triglyceride levels (P = 5.37×10−9) and higher triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio (P = 1.03×10−10). Of the 40 informative and obesity-related CpG loci, two (in IL2RB and FGF18) were significantly associated with colorectal cancer (inversely, P < 1.6×10−3) and one intergenic locus on chromosome 1 was inversely associated with myocardial infarction (P < 1.25×10−3), independently of obesity and established risk factors.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that epigenetic changes, in particular altered DNA methylation patterns, may be an intermediate biomarker at the intersection of obesity and obesity-related diseases, and could offer clues as to underlying biological mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154895 (URN)10.1038/s41366-018-0064-7 (DOI)000452830800009 ()29713043 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Adlard, B., Donaldson, S. G., Odland, J. O., Weihe, P., Berner, J., Carlsen, A., . . . Mulvad, G. (2018). Future directions for monitoring and human health research for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme. Global Health Action, 11(1), Article ID 1480084.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Future directions for monitoring and human health research for the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
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2018 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1480084Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For the last two and a half decades, a network of human health experts under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) has produced several human health assessment reports. These reports have provided a base of scientific knowledge regarding environmental contaminants and their impact on human health in the Arctic. These reports provide scientific information and policy-relevant recommendations to Arctic governments. They also support international agreements such as the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and the Minamata Convention on Mercury. Key topics discussed in this paper regarding future human health research in the circumpolar Arctic are continued contaminant biomonitoring, health effects research and risk communication. The objective of this paper is to describe knowledge gaps and future priorities for these fields.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Arctic, human health, biomonitoring, environmental contaminants
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150770 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2018.1480084 (DOI)000436336300001 ()29943674 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1227-6859

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