umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Dalton, P., Claeson, A.-S. & Horenziak, S. (2020). The Impact of Indoor Malodor: Historical Perspective, Modern Challenges, Negative Effects, and Approaches for Mitigation. Atmosphere, 11(2), Article ID 126.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Indoor Malodor: Historical Perspective, Modern Challenges, Negative Effects, and Approaches for Mitigation
2020 (English)In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 126Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malodors, odors perceived to be unpleasant or offensive, may elicit negative symptoms via the olfactory system’s connections to cognitive and behavioral systems at levels below the known thresholds for direct adverse events. Publications on harm caused by indoor malodor are fragmented across disciplines and have not been comprehensively summarized to date. This review examines the potential negative effects of indoor malodor on human behavior, performance and health, including individual factors that may govern such responses and identifies gaps in existing research. Reported findings show that indoor malodor may have negative psychological, physical, social, and economic effects. However, further research is needed to understand whether the adverse effects are elicited via an individual’s experience or expectations or through a direct effect on human physiology and well-being. Conversely, mitigating indoor malodor has been reported to have benefits on performance and subjective responses in workers. Eliminating the source of malodor is often not achievable, particularly in low-income communities. Therefore, affordable approaches to mitigate indoor malodor such as air fresheners may hold promise. However, further investigations are needed into the effectiveness of such measures on improving health outcomes such as cognition, mood, and stress levels and their overall impact on indoor air quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
malodor, indoor air, human olfaction, volatile organic comound (VOC), microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC), VOC, MVOC, health effects, smell, malodor mitigation, air fresheners, fragrance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168623 (URN)10.3390/atmos11020126 (DOI)000519238800070 ()
Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-04-02Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Gouveia-Figueira, S. C., Stenlund, H. & Johansson, A. I. (2019). A standardized protocol for comparable analysis of GSH/GSSG by UHPLC-ESI-MSMS for human plasma. Journal of chromatography. B, 1104, 67-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A standardized protocol for comparable analysis of GSH/GSSG by UHPLC-ESI-MSMS for human plasma
2019 (English)In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 1104, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Variability in the levels of GSH and GSSG in plasma is suggested to derive from inadequate pre-processing methods. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for comparable and reliable measurements of GSH/GSSG. Venous blood from 8 healthy individuals were collected and divided into 7 different pre-processing procedures. For three of the samples an extraction mixture was added after 0 (baseline), 4 and 8 min and for three of the samples the extraction mixture was added at different times during defrost. A worst case scenario where a sample was left in a cool box during 6 h was also included. The samples were analyzed with UHPLC-ESIMSMS. A large difference in the levels of GSH and GSSG were identified and it was clearly associated with the sample handling procedures. A sample left untreated for 4 min will have significantly reduced amount of GSH. Stability tests showed that the level of GSH was reduced after 3 months in -80 degrees C.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
GIutathione, GSH, GSSG, Plasma, Sample pre-processing, UHPLC-ESI-MS
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156612 (URN)10.1016/j.jchromb.2018.11.007 (DOI)000456890000008 ()30445289 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2014-1229Swedish Research Council Formas, 2016-1110
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Schéle, I., Ida, A. & Claeson, A.-S. (2019). Prototype stories of life with Chemical Intolerance: when the environment becomes a threat to health and well-being. Open Psychology, 1(1), 239-254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prototype stories of life with Chemical Intolerance: when the environment becomes a threat to health and well-being
2019 (English)In: Open Psychology, ISSN 2543-8883, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 239-254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We aimed to explore how individuals living with Chemical Intolerance (CI) describe the onset and progression of CI, and how they live and cope with CI. The participants were recruited via Swedish websites hosted by CI support groups. A postal survey, including a Life history calender, was sent to potential participants. Eleven respondents fitted the consensus-based criteria for CI while not reporting comorbidity. A narrative analysis of their written replies resulted in five prototypical stories based on similarities in the onset and course of CI. All five stories contain descriptions of alienation from society and insufficient social support. Differences in participants’ perceptions of the symptom onset – with regard to suddenness, the point in life and the perceived cause of symptoms – partly corresponded to etiological theories of CI related to stress or inflammation. Further differences between the prototype stories mainly concern the possible effects on health and well-being related to social support and coping. Given these differences, we recommend that medical professionals and others apply a holistic, context-sensitive approach before discouraging or promoting a specific coping strategy in relation to CI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2019
Keywords
coping, Chemical Intolerance, narrative analysis
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168622 (URN)10.1515/psych-2018-0016 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-03-03Bibliographically approved
Karvala, K., Sainio, M., Palmquist, E., Claeson, A.-S., Nyback, M.-H. & Nordin, S. (2018). Building-Related Environmental Intolerance and Associated Health in the General Population. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(9), Article ID 2047.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building-Related Environmental Intolerance and Associated Health in the General Population
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 2047Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People frequently attribute adverse symptoms to particular buildings when exposure to pollutants is low, within nonhazardous levels. Our aim was to characterize building-related intolerance (BRI) in the general population. Data were derived from two population-based questionnaire surveys, the Vasterbotten and osterbotten Environmental Health Study. We identified cases of BRI if respondents reported symptoms emerging from residing in certain buildings, when most other people had none. The questionnaires covered lifestyle factors, perceived general health, BRI duration and symptom frequency, the emotional and behavioral impact of BRI, coping strategies, and physician-diagnosed diseases. From the total of 4941 participants, we formed two case groups, 275 (5.6%) fulfilled criteria for self-reported BRI, and 123 (2.5%) for BRI with wide-ranging symptoms. Individuals in both case groups were significantly more often female, single, and perceived their general health as poorer than the referents, i.e., those reporting no BRI symptoms. The mean duration of BRI was 12 years. In both case groups, avoidance behavior was found in over 60%, and nearly half of the sample had sought medical care. BRI with wide-ranging symptoms was associated with elevated odds for all studied comorbidities (somatic and psychiatric diseases and functional somatic syndromes). The perceived health of individuals with BRI is poorer and comorbidities are more frequent than among referents. BRI seems to be similar to other environmental intolerances and shares features with functional somatic syndromes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
environmental intolerance, building-related intolerance, sick-building syndrome, asthma, functional somatic syndrome
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152897 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15092047 (DOI)000445765600256 ()30235805 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Andersson, H., Wikdahl, F., Nyback, M.-H. & Nordin, S. (2018). Comorbidity of Airway Inflammatory Diseases in Chemical and Building-Related Intolerance. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 60(4), 295-300
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity of Airway Inflammatory Diseases in Chemical and Building-Related Intolerance
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study investigated comorbidity in chemical intolerance (CI) and building- related intolerance (BRI) with (i) chronic sinusitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, allergic and nonallergic asthma and allergic rhinitis, and (ii) airway inflammatory symptoms. Methods: Data from two population-based questionnaire surveys, the Västerbotten and Österbotten Environmental Health Studies, were used. The participants were categorized as CI or BRI and referents, and binary logistic regression analysis was applied. Results: Prevalence rates for the case groups were 7.2% to 40.0% for diseases and 24.3% to 68.9% for symptoms, whereas adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 3.4 to 26.1 for diseases and 3.3 to 17.0 for symptoms, all being significantly higher than unity. Prevalence rates and ORs were in general higher in BRI than in CI. Conclusion: Inflammatory airway diseases and symptoms are associated with CI and BRI, which encourages further research regarding underlying mechanisms and treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
airway inflammation, allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, building-related intolerance, chemical tolerance, chronic sinusitis, COPD, nonallergic asthma
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147328 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000001249 (DOI)000429441900011 ()29227362 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Palmquist, E. & Nordin, S. (2018). Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance. International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), 221(3), 586-592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance
2018 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 221, no 3, p. 586-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents.

Methods: Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI.

Results: All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors.

Conclusions: The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Chemical intolerance, Building related intolerance, Sound intolerance, Electromagnetic hypersensitivity, Environmental risk factors, Environmental-symptom attribution scale
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151178 (URN)10.1016/j.ijheh.2018.02.009 (DOI)000438327900024 ()29523399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042857593 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Nordin, S., Aldrin, L., Claeson, A.-S. & Andersson, L. (2017). Effects of Negative Affectivity and Odor Valence on Chemosensory and Symptom Perception and Perceived Ability to Focus on a Cognitive Task. Perception, 46(3-4), 431-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Negative Affectivity and Odor Valence on Chemosensory and Symptom Perception and Perceived Ability to Focus on a Cognitive Task
2017 (English)In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to gain understanding for the impact of negative affectivity (NA) and odor valance on perceptual aspects during low-level odorous exposure. Fifty-five young adults who were either relatively low or high in NA (anxiety, depression, and somatization) were randomized for exposure to either limonene (pleasant odor) or pyridine (unpleasant odor). In an exposure chamber, they took part in baseline, blank and stable exposure sessions, during which they rated odor intensity, impact on ability to focus on an imagined cognitive task, and intensity of symptoms. The results showed higher ratings of negative impact on ability to focus during exposure to the unpleasant odor compared with the pleasant odor, and an association between NA and symptom intensity, with 18% of the variance in symptom intensity explained by somatization. The association between NA and symptom intensity was found to be driven by the factor sex. These results imply (a) that prior findings of odorous exposure that interfere negatively with work performance may be due to impact of an unpleasant odor on ability to focus on cognitive tasks and (b) that there are associations between NA, sex, and symptoms that may partly be referred to attentiveness to and interpretation of bodily sensations.

Keywords
anxiety, depression, human exposure, olfaction, pleasantness, somatization
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133802 (URN)10.1177/0301006616686990 (DOI)000397168400015 ()28094658 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Dantoft, T. M., Skovbjerg, S., Andersson, L., Claeson, A.-S., Engkilde, K., Lind, N., . . . Hellgren, L. I. (2017). Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session. BMJ Open, 7(2), Article ID e013879.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session
Show others...
2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 2, article id e013879Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants. The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom=-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n=-butanol exposure.

Design: Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure.

Settings: Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper.

Participants: 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls.

Outcome measures: 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels.

Results: MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls.

Conclusions: MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate MCS participants from controls based on gene expression measured after the exposure.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133669 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013879 (DOI)000397872400106 ()28232466 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Claeson, A.-S. & Sandberg, P. (2017). Highlighting the large variation in perceived properties of odors over time. Paper presented at 26th Annual Meeting of the European-Chemoreception-Research-Organization (ECRO), SEP 07-10, 2016, Athens, GREECE. Chemical Senses, 42(2), E26-E26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Highlighting the large variation in perceived properties of odors over time
2017 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 42, no 2, p. E26-E26Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133545 (URN)000397065700061 ()
Conference
26th Annual Meeting of the European-Chemoreception-Research-Organization (ECRO), SEP 07-10, 2016, Athens, GREECE
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Häggström, J., Fowler, C. J. & Nording, M. L. (2017). Levels of oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related lipids in plasma before and after low-level exposure to acrolein in healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 121, 60-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related lipids in plasma before and after low-level exposure to acrolein in healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, ISSN 0952-3278, E-ISSN 1532-2823, Vol. 121, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oxylipins and endocannabinoids play important biological roles, including effects upon inflammation. It is not known whether the circulating levels of these lipids are affected by inhalation of the environmental pollutant acrolein. In the present study, we have investigated the consequences of low-level exposure to acrolein on oxylipin, endocannabinoid and related lipid levels in the plasma of healthy individuals and individuals with chemical intolerance (CI), an affliction with a suggested inflammatory origin. Participants were exposed twice (60 min) to heptane and a mixture of heptane and acrolein. Blood samples were collected before exposure, after and 24 h post-exposure. There were no overt effects of acrolein exposure on the oxylipin lipidome or endocannibinoids detectable in the bloodstream at the time points investigated. No relationship between basal levels or levels after exposure to acrolein and CI could be identified. This implicates a minor role of inflammatory mediators on the systemic level in CI.

Keywords
Oxylipins, Endocannabinoids, Plasma, Human exposure, Acrolein, Chemical intolerance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136786 (URN)10.1016/j.plefa.2017.06.004 (DOI)000405763500009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010-1401
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
Specific reactive compounds causing sensitization, a possible explanation for sick building syndrome and multiple chemical sensitivity? [2010-1401_Formas]; Umeå UniversitySpecific reactive substances causing sensitization in sick building syndrome and chemical sensitivity? Sampling, analysis and health effects. [2010-965_Formas]; Umeå UniversityWhy does indoor environment cause symptoms among some individuals and not among others? A research program with focus on individuals in relation to indoor environmental factors. [2014-1229_Formas]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5026-4934

Search in DiVA

Show all publications