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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Ndile, M., Lukumay, G. G., Bölenius, K., Outwater, A. H., Saveman, B.-I. & Backteman-Erlandson, S. (2020). Impact of a postcrash first aid educational program on knowledge, perceived skills confidence, and skills utilization among traffic police officers: a single-arm before-after intervention study. BMC Emergency Medicine, 20, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a postcrash first aid educational program on knowledge, perceived skills confidence, and skills utilization among traffic police officers: a single-arm before-after intervention study
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2020 (English)In: BMC Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1471-227X, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 20, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: An overwhelming proportion of road traffic deaths and injuries in low- and middle-income countries(LMICs) occur in prehospital environments. Lay first responders such as police officers play an important role inproviding initial assistance to victims of road traffic injuries either alone or in collaboration with others. The presentstudy evaluated a postcrash first aid (PFA) educational program developed for police officers in Tanzania.

Method: A 16-h PFA educational program was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, for 135 police officers. Participantscompleted training surveys before, immediately and 6months after the training (before, N = 135; immediately after, N=135;after 6 months, N=102). The primary outcome measures were PFA knowledge, perceived skills confidence, and skillsutilization. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used to analyse changes in outcome.

Results: The mean PFA knowledge score increased from 44.73% before training (SD = 20.70) to 72.92% 6months aftertraining (SD = 18.12), p < .001, N = 102. The mean PFA perceived skills confidence score (measured on a 1–5 Likert scale)increased from 1.96 before training (SD = 0.74) to 3.78 6months after training (SD=0.70), p < .001, N = 102. Followingtraining, application of the recovery position skill (n = 42, 46%) and application of the bleeding control skill (n = 45, 49%) werereported by nearly half of the responding officers. Less than a quarter of officers reported applying head and neckimmobilization skills (n = 20, 22%) following training.

Conclusion: A PFA educational program has shown to improve police officers’ knowledge and perceived skills confidenceon provision of first aid. However qualitative research need to be conducted to shed more light regarding reasons for lowutilization of trained first aid skills during follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020
Keywords
Traffic police, Postcrash, First aid education, Road injuries
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169413 (URN)10.1186/s12873-020-00317-y (DOI)
Available from: 2020-04-01 Created: 2020-04-01 Last updated: 2020-05-14Bibliographically approved
Lämås, K., Bölenius, K., Sandman, P.-O., Bergland, Å., Lindkvist, M. & Edvardsson, D. (2020). Thriving among older people living at home with home care services-A cross-sectional study. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(4), 999-1008
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thriving among older people living at home with home care services-A cross-sectional study
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 999-1008Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To explore the level of thriving and associated factors among older adults living at home with support from home care services.

DESIGN: An exploratory, cross-sectional survey design.

METHOD: A sample of 136 participants (mean 82 years) responded to a survey about thriving, health, psychosocial and care-related factors in 2016. Descriptive analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis with a stepwise backwards elimination procedure were performed.

RESULT: The results showed that the level of thriving was relatively high among adults living at home with support from home care services, with dimensions concerning engaging in activities and peer relations and keeping in touch with people and places being rated the lowest. Regression analysis showed that participating in social relations and experiencing self-determination in activities in and around the house were associated with thriving.

CONCLUSION: Facilitating social relations and creating opportunities for self-determination seem necessary to support thriving among older adults living at home with support from home care services.

IMPACT: The findings in this study add important knowledge about place-related well-being when living at home with home care services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
aged, health, home care service, nursing, older adults, thriving, well-being
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168382 (URN)10.1111/jan.14307 (DOI)000512802700001 ()31994235 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-21 Created: 2020-02-21 Last updated: 2020-03-26Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K., Lämås, K., Sandman, P.-O., Lindkvist, M. & Edvardsson, D. (2019). Perceptions of self-determination and quality of life among Swedish home care recipients - across-sectional study. BMC Geriatrics, 19, Article ID 142.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of self-determination and quality of life among Swedish home care recipients - across-sectional study
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2019 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It is acknowledged that preservation of self-determination is very important in order for older adults to experience good quality of life, but to what degree and in what areas people receiving help from home care service experience self-determination is unknown. Few studies have examined the perception of self-determination in relation to quality of life among older adults living at home with help from home care services. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore perceptions of self-determination among older adults living at home with the support of home care services, and to test whether older adults who perceive a higher degree of self-determination also feel they have a better quality of life.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in one municipality in northern Sweden. A total of 134 older adults (≥ 65 years) were included. Data were collected by means of a survey including questionnaires about background characteristics, self-determination, and health-related quality of life. Descriptive statistics regarding background characteristics for groups with high and low self-determination respectively were presented and the differences between the groups were analyzed using the Chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test.

Results: Our main finding shows that the majority of older adults with support from home care services experience self-determination in the dimensions use of time, and self-care. However, a wide variation was found in self-reported self-determination in all dimensions. Results also show that the group with higher self-reported self-determination also reported a greater degree of experienced quality of life in comparison with the group with lower self-reported self-determination.

Conclusions: In line with earlier research, our results found a positive relation between self-determination and quality of life. The results are relevant for the care of older adults and indicate a need of further research. The results presented in this paper could serve as a guide when planning for improved self-determination among older adults in home care service.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Aged care, Health, Home care services, Nursing care, Older adults, Older people, Self-determination, Quality of life
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160298 (URN)10.1186/s12877-019-1145-8 (DOI)000468889900006 ()31126243 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Pedersen, I., Enarsson, E., Saveman, B.-I. & Bölenius, K. (2019). The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’. Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 17(2), 146-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’
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2019 (English)In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous blood specimen collection is an important practical task that results in an analysis response that often leads to a clinical decision. Errors due to inaccurate venous blood specimen collection are frequently reported and can jeopardize patient safety because inaccurate specimens may result in a delayed or incorrect diagnosis and treatment. However, few healthcare personnel have written an error report regarding venous blood specimen collection practices. The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of healthcare personnel with incident reporting of venous blood specimen collection practices in primary health care. Our study is based on 30 individual interviews with healthcare personnel from 10 primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Personnel experiences of incident reporting were summarized in three categories; Uncertainties in the planning and organization, High workload and low priority and, A need for support and guidance. More specifically, barriers hinder personnel in reporting mistakes. An interpretation based on the results is that surrounding circumstances within the organization influence whether personnel report mistakes or not. The result indicates a need for parallel systems, to identify and report errors or near-misses to prevent mistakes. Processed incidents should be returned promptly to the personnel to use as a learning experience. Having a valid questionnaire and a key person to write an incident report, might reduce the burden on the health care staff and increase the numbers of incident reports and patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Health care, incident reporting, patient safety, venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163716 (URN)10.1080/14773996.2019.1640963 (DOI)000489739800005 ()
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Willman, B., Grankvist, K. & Bölenius, K. (2018). Evaluation of the clinical implementation of a large-scale online e-learning program on venous blood specimen collection guideline practices. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 56(11), 1870-1877
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the clinical implementation of a large-scale online e-learning program on venous blood specimen collection guideline practices
2018 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 56, no 11, p. 1870-1877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: When performed erroneously, the venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) practice steps patient identification, test request management and test tube labeling are at high risk to jeopardize patient safety. VBSC educational programs with the intention to minimize risk of harm to patients are therefore needed. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of a large-scale online e-learning program on personnel's adherence to VBSC practices and their experience of the e-learning program.

METHODS: An interprofessional team transformed an implemented traditional VBSC education program to an online e-learning program developed to stimulate reflection with focus on the high-risk practice steps. We used questionnaires to evaluate the effect of the e-learning program on personnel's self-reported adherence to VBSC practices compared to questionnaire surveys before and after introduction of the traditional education program. We used content analysis to evaluate the participants free text experience of the VBSC e-learning program.

RESULTS: Adherence to the VBSC guideline high-risk practice steps generally increased following the implementation of a traditional educational program followed by an e-learning program. We however found a negative trend over years regarding participation rates and the practice to always send/sign the request form following the introduction of an electronic request system. The participants were in general content with the VBSC e-learning program.

CONCLUSION: Properly designed e-learning programs on VBSC practices supersedes traditional educational programs in usefulness and functionality. Inclusion of questionnaires in the e-learning program is necessary for follow-up of VBSC participant's practices and educational program efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2018
Keywords
clinical guideline, course evaluation, e-learning, questionnaire survey, venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147712 (URN)10.1515/cclm-2018-0051 (DOI)000446425900017 ()29750640 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Variations in the system influencing venous blood specimen collection practices: sources of pre-analytical errors. Journal of Laboratory and Precision Medicine, 3, Article ID 39.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variations in the system influencing venous blood specimen collection practices: sources of pre-analytical errors
2018 (English)In: Journal of Laboratory and Precision Medicine, ISSN 2519-9005, Vol. 3, article id 39Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Incorrect venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) practices might influence results from blood analyses and thus jeopardize patient safety. A large amount (60–80%) of important decisions in diagnosis, administration and medication are based on laboratory test results, therefore correct VBSC is of most importance. A harmonization of VBSC can lead to accurate collection procedures, rapid and correct diagnosis, and treatment. Correct test results contribute to increased patient safety and enhanced healthcare economy. VBSC errors might be consequences of both human mistakes and cultural factors in relation to the overall system. Variations in the system influencing VBSC practices might originate from international and national structures, local organizational and work cultures, and humans working in the frontline. In order to succeed in reducing sources of errors, it is of utmost importance that leaders and managers take the whole system into consideration when planning interventions in their mission to enhance practice. Thus, the aim of this article was to discuss variation in VBSC practices and how the variation might be a source of VBSC errors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AME Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
culture, errors, phlebotomy, systems theory
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147110 (URN)10.21037/jlpm.2018.04.05 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K., Lämås, K., Sandman, P.-O. & Edvardsson, D. (2017). Effects and meanings of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in homecare services: a study protocol of a non-randomised controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 17, Article ID 57.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects and meanings of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in homecare services: a study protocol of a non-randomised controlled trial
2017 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The literature indicates that current home care service are largely task oriented with limited focus on the involvement of the older people themselves, and studies show that lack of involvement might reduce older people's quality of life. Person-centred care has been shown to improve the satisfaction with care and quality of life in older people cared for in hospitals and nursing homes, with limited published evidence about the effects and meanings of person-centred interventions in home care services for older people. This study protocol outlines a study aiming to evaluate such effects and meanings of a person-centred and health-promoting intervention in home aged care services. Methods/design: The study will take the form of a non-randomised controlled trial with a before/after approach. It will include 270 older people >65 years receiving home care services, 270 relatives and 65 staff, as well as a matched control group of equal size. All participants will be recruited from a municipality in northern Sweden. The intervention is based on the theoretical concepts of person-centredness and health-promotion, and builds on the four pedagogical phases of: theory apprehension, experimental learning, operationalization, and clinical supervision. Outcome assessments will focus on: a) health and quality of life (primary outcomes), thriving and satisfaction with care for older people; b) caregiver strain, informal caregiving engagement and relatives' satisfaction with care: c) job satisfaction and stress of conscience among care staff (secondary outcomes). Evaluation will be conducted by means of self-reported questionnaires and qualitative research interviews. Discussion: Person-centred home care services have the potential to improve the recurrently reported sub-standard experiences of home care services, and the results can point the way to establishing a more person-centred and health-promoting model for home care services for older people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Aged care, Decision making, Health, Home care services, Older people, Person-centred, Quality of life
National Category
Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132087 (URN)10.1186/s12877-017-0445-0 (DOI)000397451700001 ()28209122 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2017-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lippi, G., Baird, G. S., Banfi, G., Bölenius, K., Cadamuro, J., Church, S., . . . Simundic, A.-M. (2017). Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE). Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 55(4), 489-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 489-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is now undeniable that laboratory testing is vital for the diagnosis, prognostication and therapeutic monitoring of human disease. Despite the many advances made for achieving a high degree of quality and safety in the analytical part of diagnostic testing, many hurdles in the total testing process remain, especially in the preanalytical phase ranging from test ordering to obtaining and managing the biological specimens. The Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has planned many activities aimed at mitigating the vulnerability of the preanalytical phase, including the organization of three European meetings in the past 7 years. Hence, this collective article follows the previous three opinion papers that were published by the EFLM WGPRE on the same topic, and brings together the summaries of the presentations that will be given at the 4th EFLM-BD meeting “Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation” in Amsterdam, 24–25 March, 2017.

Keywords
errors, innovation, laboratory medicine, preanalytical variability, quality
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132394 (URN)10.1515/cclm-2017-0107 (DOI)000396011000012 ()
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K., Vestin, C., Saveman, B.-I. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2017). Validating a questionnaire - prehospital preparedness for pediatric trauma patients. International Emergency Nursing, 34, 2-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validating a questionnaire - prehospital preparedness for pediatric trauma patients
2017 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 34, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent decades, prehospital emergency care has undergone extensive development. Today, prehospital emergency nurses (PENs) are well trained and provide advanced care to patients of all ages. Caring for pediatric trauma patients is considered to be particularly demanding. However, in Sweden and internationally, there is a lack of research regarding PENs' preparedness for caring for pediatric trauma patients.

Objective: The development and testing of a questionnaire on self-reported preparedness among PENs caring for pediatric trauma patients in a prehospital emergency setting.

Methods: Questionnaire development included face and content validity tests resulting in 38 questions. Eighteen of these questions were analyzed by test-retest. The content of the questionnaire was statistically analyzed.

Results: Fifteen questions were considered valid after reliability and validity tests. Three questions did not fulfill the stability criteria. The content analyses show a low degree of experience with pediatric trauma patients and half of the participants reported stress symptoms when responding to such alarms.

Conclusion: The questionnaire assessing PENs preparedness caring for pediatric trauma patients in Sweden is considered to be suitable for research and clinical practice to improve the care of pediatric trauma patients and the health of PENs, although further testing of the questionnaire is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143596 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2017.05.003 (DOI)000417589600002 ()28545931 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edvardsson, D., Backman, A., Bergland, Å., Björk, S., Bölenius, K., Kirkevold, M., . . . Winblad, B. (2016). The Umeå Ageing and health research programme (U-age): exploring person-centred care and health promoting living conditions for an ageing population. Nordic journal of nursing research, 36(3), 168-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Umeå Ageing and health research programme (U-age): exploring person-centred care and health promoting living conditions for an ageing population
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2016 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 168-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to describe the Umeå ageing and health research programme that explores person-centred care and health-promoting living conditions for an ageing population in Sweden, and to place this research programme in a national and international context of available research evidence and trends in aged care policy and practice. Contemporary trends in aged care policy includes facilitating ageing in place and providing person-centred care across home and aged care settings, despite limited evidence on how person-centred care can be operationalised in home care services and sheltered housing accommodation for older people. The Umeå ageing and health research programme consists of four research projects employing controlled, cross-sectional and longitudinal designs across ageing in place, sheltered housing, and nursing homes. The research programme is expected to provide translational knowledge on the structure, content and outcomes of person-centred care and health-promoting living conditions in home care, sheltered housing models, and nursing homes for older people and people with dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
health, home care services, housing for the elderly, nursing homes, residential facilities, sheltered housing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122764 (URN)10.1177/2057158516645705 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1074-0729

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