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Wibom, Carl
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Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Rentoft, M., Svensson, D., Sjödin, A., Olason, P. I., Sjöström, O., Nylander, C., . . . Johansson, E. (2019). A geographically matched control population efficiently limits the number of candidate disease-causing variants in an unbiased whole-genome analysis. PLoS ONE, 14(3), Article ID e0213350.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A geographically matched control population efficiently limits the number of candidate disease-causing variants in an unbiased whole-genome analysis
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e0213350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whole-genome sequencing is a promising approach for human autosomal dominant disease studies. However, the vast number of genetic variants observed by this method constitutes a challenge when trying to identify the causal variants. This is often handled by restricting disease studies to the most damaging variants, e.g. those found in coding regions, and overlooking the remaining genetic variation. Such a biased approach explains in part why the genetic causes of many families with dominantly inherited diseases, in spite of being included in whole-genome sequencing studies, are left unsolved today. Here we explore the use of a geographically matched control population to minimize the number of candidate disease-causing variants without excluding variants based on assumptions on genomic position or functional predictions. To exemplify the benefit of the geographically matched control population we apply a typical disease variant filtering strategy in a family with an autosomal dominant form of colorectal cancer. With the use of the geographically matched control population we end up with 26 candidate variants genome wide. This is in contrast to the tens of thousands of candidates left when only making use of available public variant datasets. The effect of the local control population is dual, it (1) reduces the total number of candidate variants shared between affected individuals, and more importantly (2) increases the rate by which the number of candidate variants are reduced as additional affected family members are included in the filtering strategy. We demonstrate that the application of a geographically matched control population effectively limits the number of candidate disease-causing variants and may provide the means by which variants suitable for functional studies are identified genome wide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2019
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158021 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0213350 (DOI)000462465800028 ()30917156 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2011.0042
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Andersson, U., Hougaard, D. M., Bybjerg-Grauholm, J., Deltour, I., . . . Melin, B. S. (2019). Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 28(7), 1252-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1252-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified germline genetic variants in 25 genetic loci that increase the risk of developing glioma in adulthood. It is not known if these variants increase the risk of developing glioma in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA). To date, no studies have performed genome-wide analyses to find novel genetic variants associated with glioma risk in children and AYA.

Methods: We investigated the association between 8,831,628 genetic variants and risk of glioma in 854 patients diagnosed up to the age of 29 years and 3,689 controls from Sweden and Denmark. Recruitment of patients and controls was population based. Genotyping was performed using Illumina BeadChips, and untyped variants were imputed with IMPUTE2. We selected 41 established adult glioma risk variants for detailed investigation.

Results: Three adult glioma risk variants, rs634537, rs2157719, and rs145929329, all mapping to the 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1) locus, were associated with glioma risk in children and AYA. The strongest association was seen for rs634537 (odds ratioG = 1.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.35; P = 5.8 × 10−4). In genome-wide analysis, an association with risk was suggested for 129 genetic variants (P <1 × 10−5).

Conclusions: Carriers of risk alleles in the 9p21.3 locus have an increased risk of glioma throughout life. The results from genome-wide association analyses require validation in independent cohorts.

Impact: Our findings line up with existing evidence that some, although not all, established adult glioma risk variants are associated with risk of glioma in children and AYA. Validation of results from genome-wide analyses may reveal novel susceptibility loci for glioma in children and AYA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162886 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-1026 (DOI)000481682500019 ()31040135 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Späth, F., Wibom, C., Krop, E. J., Izarra Santamaria, A., Johansson, A. S., Bergdahl, I., . . . Melin, B. S. (2019). Immune marker changes and risk of multiple myeloma: a nested case-control study using repeated prediagnostic blood samples.. Haematologica, Article ID haematol.2019.216895.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immune marker changes and risk of multiple myeloma: a nested case-control study using repeated prediagnostic blood samples.
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2019 (English)In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, article id haematol.2019.216895Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Biomarkers reliably predicting progression to multiple myeloma are lacking. Myeloma risk has been associated with low blood levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 3, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, fractalkine, and transforming growth factor alpha. In this study, we aimed to replicate these findings and study the individual dynamics of each marker in a prospective longitudinal cohort, thereby examining their potential as markers of myeloma progression. For this purpose, we identified 65 myeloma cases and 65 matched cancer-free controls each with two donated blood samples within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Samples from myeloma cases were donated in median 13 and 4 years before myeloma diagnosis. Known risk factors of progression were determined by protein-, and immunofixation electrophoresis, and free light chain assays. We observed lower levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 3, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, fractalkine, and transforming growth factor alpha in myeloma patients than controls, consistent with previous data. We also observed that these markers decreased among future myeloma patients while remaining stable in controls. Decreasing trajectories were marked for transforming growth factor alpha (P = 2.5 x 10-4) indicating progression to multiple myeloma. Investigating this, we found that low levels of transforming growth factor alpha assessed at time of the repeated sample were independently associated with risk of progression in a multivariable model (hazard ratio = 3.5; P = 0.003). Transforming growth factor alpha can potentially improve early detection of multiple myeloma. .

Keywords
Immune marker change, Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance, Multiple Myeloma, Progression, prospective longitudinal study
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158803 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2019.216895 (DOI)30948485 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-05-10
Andersson, U., Degerman, S., Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Johansson, G., Bondy, M. L. & Melin, B. S. (2019). The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking. Cancer Causes and Control, 30(2), 177-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Previous studies have suggested an association between relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL) and glioma risk. This association may be influenced by several factors, including allergies, BMI, and smoking. Previous studies have shown that individuals with asthma and allergy have shortened relative telomere length, and decreased risk of glioma. Though, the details and the interplay between rLTL, asthma and allergies, and glioma molecular phenotype is largely unknown. Methods: rLTL was measured by qPCR in a Swedish population-based glioma case–control cohort (421 cases and 671 controls). rLTL was related to glioma risk and health parameters associated with asthma and allergy, as well as molecular events in glioma including IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and EGFR amplification. Results: Longer rLTL was associated with increased risk of glioma (OR = 1.16; 95% CI 1.02–1.31). Similar to previous reports, there was an inverse association between allergy and glioma risk. Specific, allergy symptoms including watery eyes was most strongly associated with glioma risk. High body mass index (BMI) a year prior diagnosis was significantly protective against glioma in our population. Adjusting for allergy, asthma, BMI, and smoking did not markedly change the association between longer rLTL and glioma risk. rLTL among cases was not associated with IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, or EGFR amplification, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and sex. Conclusions: In this Swedish glioma case–control cohort, we identified that long rLTL increases the risk of glioma, an association not confounded by allergy, BMI, or smoking. This highlights the complex interplay of the immune system, rLTL and cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Glioma, Relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL), Allergy, BMI, Smoking, IDH1, 1p/19q, EGFR
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157597 (URN)10.1007/s10552-018-1120-2 (DOI)000459153800007 ()30560391 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Späth, F., Wibom, C., Krop, E. J. M., Johansson, A.-S., Bergdahl, I. A., Vermeulen, R. & Melin, B. (2017). Biomarker Dynamics in B-cell Lymphoma: A Longitudinal Prospective Study of Plasma Samples Up to 25 Years before Diagnosis. Cancer Research, 77(6), 1408-1415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomarker Dynamics in B-cell Lymphoma: A Longitudinal Prospective Study of Plasma Samples Up to 25 Years before Diagnosis
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2017 (English)In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 77, no 6, p. 1408-1415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The B-cell activation markers CXCL13, sCD23, (S)CD27, and sCD30 are associated with future lymphoma risk. However, a lack of information about the individual dynamics of markerdisease association hampers interpretation. In this study, we identified 170 individuals who had donated two prediagnostic blood samples before B-cell lymphoma diagnosis, along with 170 matched cancer-free controls from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Lymphoma risk associations were investigated by subtype and marker levels measured at baseline, at the time of the repeated sample, and with the rate of change in the marker level. Notably, we observed strong associations between CXCL13, sCD23, sCD27, and sCD30 and lymphoma risk in blood samples collected 15 to 25 years before diagnosis. B-cell activation marker levels increased among future lympho-ma cases over time, while remaining stable among controls. Associations between slope and risk were strongest for indolent lymphoma subtypes. We noted a marked association of sCD23 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (ORSlope - 28, Ptrend(-)7.279 x 10 (-10)). Among aggressive lymphomas, the association between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma risk and slope was restricted to CXCL13. B-cell activation seemed to play a role in B-cell lymphoma development at early stages across different subtypes. Furthermore, B-cell activation presented differential trajectories in future lymphoma patients, mainly driven by indolent subtypes. Our results suggest a utility of these markers in predicting the presence of early occult disease and/or the screening and monitoring of indolent lymphoma in individual patients. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2017
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140249 (URN)10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-2345 (DOI)000396845600015 ()28108506 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Mörén, L., Wibom, C., Bergström, P., Johansson, M., Antti, H. & Bergenheim, A. T. (2016). Characterization of the serum metabolome following radiation treatment in patients with high-grade gliomas. Radiation Oncology, 11, Article ID 51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the serum metabolome following radiation treatment in patients with high-grade gliomas
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2016 (English)In: Radiation Oncology, ISSN 1748-717X, E-ISSN 1748-717X, Vol. 11, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Glioblastomas progress rapidly making response evaluation using MRI insufficient since treatment effects are not detectable until months after initiation of treatment. Thus, there is a strong need for supplementary biomarkers that could provide reliable and early assessment of treatment efficacy. Analysis of alterations in the metabolome may be a source for identification of new biomarker patterns harboring predictive information. Ideally, the biomarkers should be found within an easily accessible compartment such as the blood. Method: Using gas-chromatographic-time-of-flight-mass spectroscopy we have analyzed serum samples from 11 patients with glioblastoma during the initial phase of radiotherapy. Fasting serum samples were collected at admittance, on the same day as, but before first treatment and in the morning after the second and fifth dose of radiation. The acquired data was analyzed and evaluated by chemometrics based bioinformatics methods. Our findings were compared and discussed in relation to previous data from microdialysis in tumor tissue, i.e. the extracellular compartment, from the same patients. Results: We found a significant change in metabolite pattern in serum comparing samples taken before radiotherapy to samples taken during early radiotherapy. In all, 68 metabolites were lowered in concentration following treatment while 16 metabolites were elevated in concentration. All detected and identified amino acids and fatty acids together with myo-inositol, creatinine, and urea were among the metabolites that decreased in concentration during treatment, while citric acid was among the metabolites that increased in concentration. Furthermore, when comparing results from the serum analysis with findings in tumor extracellular fluid we found a common change in metabolite patterns in both compartments on an individual patient level. On an individual metabolite level similar changes in ornithine, tyrosine and urea were detected. However, in serum, glutamine and glutamate were lowered after treatment while being elevated in the tumor extracellular fluid. Conclusion: Cross-validated multivariate statistical models verified that the serum metabolome was significantly changed in relation to radiation in a similar pattern to earlier findings in tumor tissue. However, all individual changes in tissue did not translate into changes in serum. Our study indicates that serum metabolomics could be of value to investigate as a potential marker for assessing early response to radiotherapy in malignant glioma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Glioblastoma, Radiation therapy, Treatment response, Metabolomics, Chemometrics
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119631 (URN)10.1186/s13014-016-0626-6 (DOI)000373185900001 ()27039175 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-20 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ghasimi, S., Wibom, C., Dahlin, A. M., Brännström, T., Golovleva, I., Andersson, U. & Melin, B. (2016). Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma. Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 127(3), 483-492
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 483-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last years, genome wide association studies have discovered common germline genetic variants associated with specific glioma subtypes. We aimed to study the association between these germline risk variants and tumor phenotypes, including copy number aberrations and protein expression. A total of 91 glioma patients were included. Thirteen well known genetic risk variants in TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PHLDB1, TP53, and RTEL1 were selected for investigation of possible correlations with the glioma somatic markers: EGFR amplification, 1p/19q codeletion and protein expression of p53, Ki-67, and mutated IDH1. The CDKN2A/B risk variant, rs4977756, and the CDKN2B risk variant, rs1412829 were inversely associated (p = 0.049 and p = 0.002, respectively) with absence of a mutated IDH1, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele showed no or low expression of mutated IDH1. The RTEL1 risk variant, rs6010620 was associated (p = 0.013) with not having 1p/19q codeletion, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele did not show 1p/19q codeletion. In addition, the EGFR risk variant rs17172430 and the CDKN2B risk variant rs1412829, both showed a trend for association (p = 0.055 and p = 0.051, respectively) with increased EGFR copy number, i.e., the majority of patients homozygote for the risk alleles showed chromosomal gain or amplification of EGFR. Our findings indicate that CDKN2A/B risk genotypes are associated with primary glioblastoma without IDH mutation, and that there is an inverse association between RTEL1 risk genotypes and 1p/19q codeletion, suggesting that these genetic variants have a molecular impact on the genesis of high graded brain tumors. Further experimental studies are needed to delineate the functional mechanism of the association between genotype and somatic genetic aberrations.

Keywords
CDKN2A/B, EGFR, RTEL1, SNP, FISH, ASCAT
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121460 (URN)10.1007/s11060-016-2066-4 (DOI)000374463800009 ()26839018 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
diva2:1046899
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolomic screening of pre-diagnostic serum samples identifies association between alpha- and gamma-tocopherols and glioblastoma risk
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2016 (English)In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 37043-37053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glioblastoma is associated with poor prognosis with a median survival of one year. High doses of ionizing radiation is the only established exogenous risk factor. To explore new potential biological risk factors for glioblastoma, we investigated alterations in metabolite concentrations in pre-diagnosed serum samples from glioblastoma patients diagnosed up to 22 years after sample collection, and undiseased controls. The study points out a latent biomarker for future glioblastoma consisting of nine metabolites (gamma-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, erythritol, erythronic acid, myo-inositol, cystine, 2-keto-L-gluconic acid, hypoxanthine and xanthine) involved in antioxidant metabolism. We detected significantly higher serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol (p=0.0018) and gamma-tocopherol (p=0.0009) in future glioblastoma cases. Compared to their matched controls, the cases showed a significant average fold increase of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol levels: 1.2 for alpha-T (p=0.018) and 1.6 for gamma-T (p=0.003). These tocopherol levels were associated with a glioblastoma odds ratio of 1.7 (alpha-T, 95% CI: 1.0-3.0) and 2.1 (gamma-T, 95% CI: 1.2-3.8). Our exploratory metabolomics study detected elevated serum levels of a panel of molecules with antioxidant properties as well as oxidative stress generated compounds. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the association between the observed serum metabolite pattern and future glioblastoma development.

Keywords
population-based, serum metabolite, vitamin E, antioxidants, brain tumor
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123973 (URN)10.18632/oncotarget.9242 (DOI)000377756800119 ()
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Späth, F., Andersson, U., Dahlin, A. M., Langseth, H., Hovig, E., Johannesen, T. B., . . . Melin, B. (2016). Pre-diagnostic serum levels of EGFR and ErbB2 and genetic glioma risk variants: a nested case-control study. Tumor Biology, 37(8), 11065-11072
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnostic serum levels of EGFR and ErbB2 and genetic glioma risk variants: a nested case-control study
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2016 (English)In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 11065-11072Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genetic variants have been associated with the risk of developing glioma, but functional mechanisms on disease phenotypic traits remain to be investigated. One phenotypic trait of glioblastoma is the mutation and amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. We investigated associations between pre-diagnostic serum protein concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2, both members of the EGFR family, and future risk of glioma. Further, we studied if EGFR glioma risk variants were associated with EGFR and ErbB2 serum levels. We assessed the associations between genetic glioma risk variants and serum concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2, as measured in pre-diagnostic cohort serum samples of 593 glioma patients and 590 matched cancer-free controls. High serum EGFR and ErbB2 levels were associated with risk of developing glioblastoma (P = 0.008; OR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.13-2.22 and P = 0.017, OR = 1.63, 95 % CI = 1.09-2.44, respectively). High serum ErbB2 concentration was also associated with glioma risk overall (P = 0.049; OR = 1.39, 95 % CI = 1.00-1.93). Glioma risk variants were not associated with high serum protein abundance. In contrast, the EGFR risk variant rs4947986 (T) was correlated with decreased EGFR serum levels (study cohort P = 0.024 and controls P = 0.009). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an association of EGFR and ErbB2 serum levels with glioma more than a decade before diagnosis, indicating that EGFR and ErbB2 serum proteins are important in early gliomagenesis. However, we did not find evidence that glioma risk variants were associated with high pre-diagnostic serum concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2.

Keywords
Glioma, SNP, Serum EGFR, Serum ErbB2, Pre-diagnostic
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126327 (URN)10.1007/s13277-015-4742-y (DOI)000382672900107 ()26906551 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-01 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Ghasimi, S., Brännström, T., Andersson, U. & Melin, B. (2016). Relation between Established Glioma Risk Variants and DNA Methylation in the Tumor. PLoS ONE, 11(10), Article ID e0163067.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relation between Established Glioma Risk Variants and DNA Methylation in the Tumor
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0163067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies have identified several genetic variants that increase glioma risk. The majority of these variants are non-coding and the mechanisms behind the increased risk in carriers are not known. In this study, we hypothesize that some of the established glioma risk variants induce aberrant DNA methylation in the developing tumor, either locally (gene-specific) or globally (genome-wide). In a pilot data set including 77 glioma patients, we used Illumina beadchip technology to analyze genetic variants in blood and DNA methylation in matched tumor samples. To validate our findings, we used data from the Cancer Genome Atlas, including 401 glioblastoma patients. Consensus clustering identified the glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (gCIMP) and two additional subgroups with distinct patterns of global DNA methylation. In the pilot dataset, gCIMP was associated with two genetic variants in CDKN2B-AS1, rs1412829 and rs4977756 (9p21.3, p = 8.1 x 10(-7) and 4.8 x 10(-5), respectively). The association was in the same direction in the TCGA dataset, although statistically significant only when combining individuals with AG and GG genotypes. We also investigated the relation between glioma risk variants and DNA methylation in the promoter region of genes located within 30 kb of each variant. One association in the pilot dataset, between the TERT risk variant rs2736100 and lower methylation of cg23827991 (in TERT; p = 0.001), was confirmed in the TCGA dataset (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we found an association between rs1412829 and rs4977756 (9p21.3, CDKN2B-AS1) and global DNA methylation pattern in glioma, for which a trend was seen also in the TCGA glioblastoma dataset. We also found an association between rs2736100 (in TERT) and levels of methylation at cg23827991 (localized in the same gene, 3.3 kbp downstream of the risk variant), which was validated in the TCGA dataset. Except for this one association, we did not find strong evidence for gene-specific DNA methylation mediated by glioma risk variants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2016
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130026 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0163067 (DOI)000389046900002 ()
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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