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Andersson, Ulrika
Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Andersson, U., Hougaard, D. M., Bybjerg-Grauholm, J., Deltour, I., . . . Melin, B. S. (2019). Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 28(7), 1252-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Variants in the 9p21.3 Locus Associated with Glioma Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Case-Control Study
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1252-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified germline genetic variants in 25 genetic loci that increase the risk of developing glioma in adulthood. It is not known if these variants increase the risk of developing glioma in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA). To date, no studies have performed genome-wide analyses to find novel genetic variants associated with glioma risk in children and AYA.

Methods: We investigated the association between 8,831,628 genetic variants and risk of glioma in 854 patients diagnosed up to the age of 29 years and 3,689 controls from Sweden and Denmark. Recruitment of patients and controls was population based. Genotyping was performed using Illumina BeadChips, and untyped variants were imputed with IMPUTE2. We selected 41 established adult glioma risk variants for detailed investigation.

Results: Three adult glioma risk variants, rs634537, rs2157719, and rs145929329, all mapping to the 9p21.3 (CDKN2B-AS1) locus, were associated with glioma risk in children and AYA. The strongest association was seen for rs634537 (odds ratioG = 1.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.35; P = 5.8 × 10−4). In genome-wide analysis, an association with risk was suggested for 129 genetic variants (P <1 × 10−5).

Conclusions: Carriers of risk alleles in the 9p21.3 locus have an increased risk of glioma throughout life. The results from genome-wide association analyses require validation in independent cohorts.

Impact: Our findings line up with existing evidence that some, although not all, established adult glioma risk variants are associated with risk of glioma in children and AYA. Validation of results from genome-wide analyses may reveal novel susceptibility loci for glioma in children and AYA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162886 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-1026 (DOI)000481682500019 ()31040135 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ostrom, Q. T., Coleman, W., Huang, W., Rubin, J. B., Lathia, J. D., Berens, M. E., . . . Buring, J. (2019). Sex-specific gene and pathway modeling of inherited glioma risk. Neuro-Oncology, 21(1), 71-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific gene and pathway modeling of inherited glioma risk
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2019 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 25 risk variants for glioma, explaining 30% of heritable risk. Most histologies occur with significantly higher incidence in males, and this difference is not explained by currently known risk factors. A previous GWAS identified sex-specific glioma risk variants, and this analysis aims to further elucidate risk variation by sex using gene- and pathway-based approaches. Methods Results from the Glioma International Case-Control Study were used as a testing set, and results from 3 GWAS were combined via meta-analysis and used as a validation set. Using summary statistics for nominally significant autosomal SNPs (P < 0.01 in a previous meta-analysis) and nominally significant X-chromosome SNPs (P < 0.01), 3 algorithms (Pascal, BimBam, and GATES) were used to generate gene scores, and Pascal was used to generate pathway scores. Results were considered statistically significant in the discovery set when P < 3.3 x 10(-6) and in the validation set when P < 0.001 in 2 of 3 algorithms. Results Twenty-five genes within 5 regions and 19 genes within 6 regions reached statistical significance in at least 2 of 3 algorithms in males and females, respectively. EGFR was significantly associated with all glioma and glioblastoma in males only and a female-specific association in TERT, all of which remained nominally significant after conditioning on known risk loci. There were nominal associations with the BioCarta telomeres pathway in both males and females. Conclusions These results provide additional evidence that there may be differences by sex in genetic risk for glioma. Additional analyses may further elucidate the biological processes through which this risk is conferred.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158124 (URN)10.1093/neuonc/noy135 (DOI)000462586300009 ()30124908 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietyNIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA139020NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA52689NIH (National Institute of Health), P50CA097257NIH (National Institute of Health), R01CA126831
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Andersson, U., Degerman, S., Dahlin, A. M., Wibom, C., Johansson, G., Bondy, M. L. & Melin, B. S. (2019). The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking. Cancer Causes and Control, 30(2), 177-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between longer relative leukocyte telomere length and risk of glioma is independent of the potentially confounding factors allergy, BMI, and smoking
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Previous studies have suggested an association between relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL) and glioma risk. This association may be influenced by several factors, including allergies, BMI, and smoking. Previous studies have shown that individuals with asthma and allergy have shortened relative telomere length, and decreased risk of glioma. Though, the details and the interplay between rLTL, asthma and allergies, and glioma molecular phenotype is largely unknown. Methods: rLTL was measured by qPCR in a Swedish population-based glioma case–control cohort (421 cases and 671 controls). rLTL was related to glioma risk and health parameters associated with asthma and allergy, as well as molecular events in glioma including IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and EGFR amplification. Results: Longer rLTL was associated with increased risk of glioma (OR = 1.16; 95% CI 1.02–1.31). Similar to previous reports, there was an inverse association between allergy and glioma risk. Specific, allergy symptoms including watery eyes was most strongly associated with glioma risk. High body mass index (BMI) a year prior diagnosis was significantly protective against glioma in our population. Adjusting for allergy, asthma, BMI, and smoking did not markedly change the association between longer rLTL and glioma risk. rLTL among cases was not associated with IDH1 mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, or EGFR amplification, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and sex. Conclusions: In this Swedish glioma case–control cohort, we identified that long rLTL increases the risk of glioma, an association not confounded by allergy, BMI, or smoking. This highlights the complex interplay of the immune system, rLTL and cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Glioma, Relative leukocyte telomere length (rLTL), Allergy, BMI, Smoking, IDH1, 1p/19q, EGFR
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157597 (URN)10.1007/s10552-018-1120-2 (DOI)000459153800007 ()30560391 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Ostrom, Q. T., Kinnersley, B., Armstrong, G., Rice, T., Chen, Y., Wiencke, J. K., . . . Barnholtz-Sloan, J. S. S. (2018). Age‐specific genome‐wide association study in glioblastoma identifies increased proportion of 'lower grade glioma'‐like features associated with younger age. International Journal of Cancer, 143(10), 2359-2366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age‐specific genome‐wide association study in glioblastoma identifies increased proportion of 'lower grade glioma'‐like features associated with younger age
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 10, p. 2359-2366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in the United States. Incidence of GBM increases with age, and younger age‐at‐diagnosis is significantly associated with improved prognosis. While the relationship between candidate GBM risk SNPs and age‐at‐diagnosis has been explored, genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have not previously been stratified by age. Potential age‐specific genetic effects were assessed in autosomal SNPs for GBM patients using data from four previous GWAS. Using age distribution tertiles (18–53, 54–64, 65+) datasets were analyzed using age‐stratified logistic regression to generate p values, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), and then combined using meta‐analysis. There were 4,512 total GBM cases, and 10,582 controls used for analysis. Significant associations were detected at two previously identified SNPs in 7p11.2 (rs723527 [p54–63 = 1.50x10−9, OR54–63 = 1.28, 95%CI54–63 = 1.18–1.39; p64+ = 2.14x10−11, OR64+ = 1.32, 95%CI64+ = 1.21–1.43] and rs11979158 [p54–63 = 6.13x10−8, OR54–63 = 1.35, 95%CI54–63 = 1.21–1.50; p64+ = 2.18x10−10, OR64+ = 1.42, 95%CI64+ = 1.27–1.58]) but only in persons >54. There was also a significant association at the previously identified lower grade glioma (LGG) risk locus at 8q24.21 (rs55705857) in persons ages 18–53 (p18–53 = 9.30 × 10−11, OR18–53 = 1.76, 95%CI18–53 = 1.49–2.10). Within The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) there was higher prevalence of ‘LGG’‐like tumor characteristics in GBM samples in those 18–53, with IDH1/2 mutation frequency of 15%, as compared to 2.1% [54–63] and 0.8% [64+] (p = 0.0005). Age‐specific differences in cancer susceptibility can provide important clues to etiology. The association of a SNP known to confer risk for IDH1/2 mutant glioma and higher prevalence of IDH1/2 mutation within younger individuals 18–53 suggests that more younger individuals may present initially with ‘secondary glioblastoma.’

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
glioma, brain tumors, age
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154946 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31759 (DOI)000450113100004 ()30152087 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Ostrom, Q. T., Kinnersley, B., Wrensch, M. R., Eckel-Passow, J. E., Armstrong, G., Rice, T., . . . Barnholtz-Sloan, J. S. S. (2018). Sex-specific glioma genome-wide association study identifies new risk locus at 3p21.31 in females, and finds sex-differences in risk at 8q24.21. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 7352.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific glioma genome-wide association study identifies new risk locus at 3p21.31 in females, and finds sex-differences in risk at 8q24.21
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Incidence of glioma is approximately 50% higher in males. Previous analyses have examined exposures related to sex hormones in women as potential protective factors for these tumors, with inconsistent results. Previous glioma genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not stratified by sex. Potential sex-specific genetic effects were assessed in autosomal SNPs and sex chromosome variants for all glioma, GBM and non-GBM patients using data from four previous glioma GWAS. Datasets were analyzed using sex-stratified logistic regression models and combined using meta-analysis. There were 4,831 male cases, 5,216 male controls, 3,206 female cases and 5,470 female controls. A significant association was detected at rs11979158 (7p11.2) in males only. Association at rs55705857 (8q24.21) was stronger in females than in males. A large region on 3p21.31 was identified with significant association in females only. The identified differences in effect of risk variants do not fully explain the observed incidence difference in glioma by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150697 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-24580-z (DOI)000431737300038 ()29743610 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Melin, B. S., Barnholtz-Sloan, J. S., Wrensch, M. R., Johansen, C., Il'yasova, D., Kinnersley, B., . . . Bondy, M. L. (2017). Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors [Letter to the editor]. Nature Genetics, 49(5), 789-794
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors
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2017 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 789-794Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have transformed our understanding of glioma susceptibility, but individual studies have had limited power to identify risk loci. We performed a meta-analysis of existing GWAS and two new GWAS, which totaled 12,496 cases and 18,190 controls. We identified five new loci for glioblastoma (GBM) at 1p31.3 (rs12752552; P = 2.04 x 10(-9), odds ratio (OR) = 1.22), 11q14.1 (rs11233250; P = 9.95 x 10(-10), OR = 1.24), 16p13.3 (rs2562152; P = 1.93 x 10-8, OR = 1.21), 16q12.1 (rs10852606; P = 1.29 x 10(-11), OR = 1.18) and 22q13.1 (rs2235573; P = 1.76 x 10(-10), OR = 1.15), as well as eight loci for non-GBM tumors at 1q32.1 (rs4252707; P = 3.34 x 10(-9), OR = 1.19), 1q44 (rs12076373; P = 2.63 x 10(-10), OR = 1.23), 2q33.3 (rs7572263; P = 2.18 x 10(-10), OR = 1.20), 3p14.1 (rs11706832; P = 7.66 x 10(-9), OR = 1.15), 10q24.33 (rs11598018; P = 3.39 x 10-8, OR = 1.14), 11q21 (rs7107785; P = 3.87 x 10(-10), OR = 1.16), 14q12 (rs10131032; P = 5.07 x 10(-11), OR = 1.33) and 16p13.3 (rs3751667; P = 2.61 x 10(-9), OR = 1.18). These data substantiate that genetic susceptibility to GBM and non-GBM tumors are highly distinct, which likely reflects different etiology.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135267 (URN)10.1038/ng.3823 (DOI)000400051400019 ()28346443 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, U., Degerman, S., Dahlin, A., Brannstrom, T., Roos, G. & Melin, B. S. (2017). TELOMERE LENGTH, ALLERGIES AND RISK OF GLIOMA. Paper presented at 5th Quadrennial Meeting of the World-Federation-of-Neuro-Oncology-Societies (WFNOS), MAY 04-07, 2017, Zurich, SWITZERLAND. Neuro-Oncology, 19(Supplement: 3), 23-23, Article ID Meeting Abstract: P01.03.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>TELOMERE LENGTH, ALLERGIES AND RISK OF GLIOMA
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2017 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 19, no Supplement: 3, p. 23-23, article id Meeting Abstract: P01.03Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2017
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136984 (URN)000402732900081 ()
Conference
5th Quadrennial Meeting of the World-Federation-of-Neuro-Oncology-Societies (WFNOS), MAY 04-07, 2017, Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ghasimi, S., Wibom, C., Dahlin, A. M., Brännström, T., Golovleva, I., Andersson, U. & Melin, B. (2016). Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma. Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 127(3), 483-492
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 483-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last years, genome wide association studies have discovered common germline genetic variants associated with specific glioma subtypes. We aimed to study the association between these germline risk variants and tumor phenotypes, including copy number aberrations and protein expression. A total of 91 glioma patients were included. Thirteen well known genetic risk variants in TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PHLDB1, TP53, and RTEL1 were selected for investigation of possible correlations with the glioma somatic markers: EGFR amplification, 1p/19q codeletion and protein expression of p53, Ki-67, and mutated IDH1. The CDKN2A/B risk variant, rs4977756, and the CDKN2B risk variant, rs1412829 were inversely associated (p = 0.049 and p = 0.002, respectively) with absence of a mutated IDH1, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele showed no or low expression of mutated IDH1. The RTEL1 risk variant, rs6010620 was associated (p = 0.013) with not having 1p/19q codeletion, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele did not show 1p/19q codeletion. In addition, the EGFR risk variant rs17172430 and the CDKN2B risk variant rs1412829, both showed a trend for association (p = 0.055 and p = 0.051, respectively) with increased EGFR copy number, i.e., the majority of patients homozygote for the risk alleles showed chromosomal gain or amplification of EGFR. Our findings indicate that CDKN2A/B risk genotypes are associated with primary glioblastoma without IDH mutation, and that there is an inverse association between RTEL1 risk genotypes and 1p/19q codeletion, suggesting that these genetic variants have a molecular impact on the genesis of high graded brain tumors. Further experimental studies are needed to delineate the functional mechanism of the association between genotype and somatic genetic aberrations.

Keywords
CDKN2A/B, EGFR, RTEL1, SNP, FISH, ASCAT
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121460 (URN)10.1007/s11060-016-2066-4 (DOI)000374463800009 ()26839018 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Björkblom, B., Wibom, C., Jonsson, P., Mörén, L., Andersson, U., Johannesen, T. B., . . . Melin, B. (2016). Metabolomic screening of pre-diagnostic serum samples identifies association between alpha- and gamma-tocopherols and glioblastoma risk. OncoTarget, 7(24), 37043-37053
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolomic screening of pre-diagnostic serum samples identifies association between alpha- and gamma-tocopherols and glioblastoma risk
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2016 (English)In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 37043-37053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glioblastoma is associated with poor prognosis with a median survival of one year. High doses of ionizing radiation is the only established exogenous risk factor. To explore new potential biological risk factors for glioblastoma, we investigated alterations in metabolite concentrations in pre-diagnosed serum samples from glioblastoma patients diagnosed up to 22 years after sample collection, and undiseased controls. The study points out a latent biomarker for future glioblastoma consisting of nine metabolites (gamma-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, erythritol, erythronic acid, myo-inositol, cystine, 2-keto-L-gluconic acid, hypoxanthine and xanthine) involved in antioxidant metabolism. We detected significantly higher serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol (p=0.0018) and gamma-tocopherol (p=0.0009) in future glioblastoma cases. Compared to their matched controls, the cases showed a significant average fold increase of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol levels: 1.2 for alpha-T (p=0.018) and 1.6 for gamma-T (p=0.003). These tocopherol levels were associated with a glioblastoma odds ratio of 1.7 (alpha-T, 95% CI: 1.0-3.0) and 2.1 (gamma-T, 95% CI: 1.2-3.8). Our exploratory metabolomics study detected elevated serum levels of a panel of molecules with antioxidant properties as well as oxidative stress generated compounds. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the association between the observed serum metabolite pattern and future glioblastoma development.

Keywords
population-based, serum metabolite, vitamin E, antioxidants, brain tumor
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-123973 (URN)10.18632/oncotarget.9242 (DOI)000377756800119 ()
Available from: 2016-11-15 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Späth, F., Andersson, U., Dahlin, A. M., Langseth, H., Hovig, E., Johannesen, T. B., . . . Melin, B. (2016). Pre-diagnostic serum levels of EGFR and ErbB2 and genetic glioma risk variants: a nested case-control study. Tumor Biology, 37(8), 11065-11072
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnostic serum levels of EGFR and ErbB2 and genetic glioma risk variants: a nested case-control study
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2016 (English)In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 11065-11072Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genetic variants have been associated with the risk of developing glioma, but functional mechanisms on disease phenotypic traits remain to be investigated. One phenotypic trait of glioblastoma is the mutation and amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. We investigated associations between pre-diagnostic serum protein concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2, both members of the EGFR family, and future risk of glioma. Further, we studied if EGFR glioma risk variants were associated with EGFR and ErbB2 serum levels. We assessed the associations between genetic glioma risk variants and serum concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2, as measured in pre-diagnostic cohort serum samples of 593 glioma patients and 590 matched cancer-free controls. High serum EGFR and ErbB2 levels were associated with risk of developing glioblastoma (P = 0.008; OR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.13-2.22 and P = 0.017, OR = 1.63, 95 % CI = 1.09-2.44, respectively). High serum ErbB2 concentration was also associated with glioma risk overall (P = 0.049; OR = 1.39, 95 % CI = 1.00-1.93). Glioma risk variants were not associated with high serum protein abundance. In contrast, the EGFR risk variant rs4947986 (T) was correlated with decreased EGFR serum levels (study cohort P = 0.024 and controls P = 0.009). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an association of EGFR and ErbB2 serum levels with glioma more than a decade before diagnosis, indicating that EGFR and ErbB2 serum proteins are important in early gliomagenesis. However, we did not find evidence that glioma risk variants were associated with high pre-diagnostic serum concentrations of EGFR and ErbB2.

Keywords
Glioma, SNP, Serum EGFR, Serum ErbB2, Pre-diagnostic
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126327 (URN)10.1007/s13277-015-4742-y (DOI)000382672900107 ()26906551 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-01 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
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