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Liu-Helmersson, Jing
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Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Liu-Helmersson, J., Sedholm, O., Arnold, T., Ponga, A. & Spik, L. (2023). Sámi indigenous people’s tradition on uses of plants for healing/health and Sámi relationship with nature: an interview study in northern Sweden. In: Journal of Arctic studies: VI (pp. 176-246). Liaocheng: Arctic Studies Center, 6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sámi indigenous people’s tradition on uses of plants for healing/health and Sámi relationship with nature: an interview study in northern Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Arctic studies: VI, Liaocheng: Arctic Studies Center , 2023, Vol. 6, p. 176-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Sámi Indigenous population lives in the Arctic Sápmi area across four countries: Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. Wild plants have been gathered and used for food and medicine for millennia in Sámi tradition. This study aims to introduce Sámi tradition on the use of plants for medicine and health in Sweden and the Sámi Indigenous People’s view and relationship with nature and their land. A qualitative interview research method was used with five key informants in Sweden, of whom four are Sámi. The study finds that in Sámi tradition on plant use, medicine, food and spirits are inseparable; the knowledge carriers for medical use are Sámi healers, of whom not many are still living. The young Sámi people know very little about this traditional knowledge. The Sámi Indigenous People have a very close and respectful relationship with their land/nature, based in a view that is holistic, interconnected and long-term. Today the Sámi People have a troubled relationship with their land. Ecological systems theory is used to understand the current situation on plant use and relationships with the land. The Sámi worldview is still relevant for today’s societies that face great challenges from climate change to the pandemic.  

Abstract [zh]

萨米土著居住的北极萨普米地区横跨了四个国家:挪威、瑞典、芬兰和俄罗斯科拉半岛。在萨米传统里,人们收集野生植物食用和药用的历史已有上千年。本研究意在介绍瑞典萨米人将植物用于医药和食物的传统,并介绍萨米土著与自然及其土地之间的关系及观念。本研究采用定性访谈的研究方法,对瑞典的五位重要报道人进行采访,其中四位是萨米人。本研究发现,在萨米植物利用的传统里,医药、食物和精神是不可分割的;萨米医学知识的传承者是目前已为数不多的萨米医师(healer)。萨米的年轻人对这一传统知识的了解已经很少了。基于一种整体的、相互联系的、长期的理念,萨米土著与他们的土地/ 自然有着非常紧密且敬畏的关系。而今天的萨米人与土地的关系出现了问题。本研究使用生态系统理论解读当前的植物使用情况和土地关系情况。萨米世界观对今天我们应对气候变迁及至大流行病等种种挑战,仍然具有借鉴意 义。

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liaocheng: Arctic Studies Center, 2023
Series
Journal of Arctic studies ; 6
Keywords
Sámi, Arctic Indigenous People, plants, nature, worldview, Sámi traditional medicine, traditional healing, ecological systems theory, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Inuit
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214643 (URN)978-7-5426-7986-4 (ISBN)
Note

Chapter in English and in Chinese. 

Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-09-22Bibliographically approved
Liu-Helmersson, J., Stoor, K. & Nilsson, L. M. (2022). Indigenous research at Várdduo - Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden. In: Journal of Arctic studies: V (pp. 341-351). Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous research at Várdduo - Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden
2022 (Chinese)In: Journal of Arctic studies: V, Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center , 2022, Vol. 5, p. 341-351Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Várdduo – The Centre for Sami Research was established in the year 2000 under the Faculty of Arts. Umeå University has expanded its Indigenous research area, from Sami languages ​​and culture at the beginning (1975), to four areas today: Education and Language, Health and Living Conditions, Land and Water, Culture and History. This essay introduces the development of indigenous-related research at Umeå University with a focus on the research from Várdduo in the past 20 years. Today Várdduo serves as a hub for active expansion of research related to Indigenous issues at Umeå university to local, national and international arenas. Indigenous research at Umeå University/Várdduo, although still mainly on Sámi issues, has experienced a development characterized by fast growth, diversity, interdisciplinarity and increasing international commitment. 

Abstract [zh]

瓦尔多萨米族人研究中心于2000 年成立,附属于人文学院。于默奥大学已将其原住民研究领域从最初(1975 年)的萨米语言和文化扩大到今天的四个领域:教育和语言、健康和生活条件、土地和水、文化和历史。本文介绍了于默奥大学尤其是瓦尔多萨米族人研究中心近20 年来原住民研究的发展情况。今天,瓦尔多作为一个中心,积极将于默奥大学有关原住民问题的研究扩展到地方、国家和国际领域。于默奥大学/ 瓦尔多的原住民研究虽然仍然主要关注萨米族人问题,但已经经历了快速增长、多样性、跨学科和越来越多的国际承诺的发展。

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center, 2022
Series
Journal of Arctic studies ; 5
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214651 (URN)978-7-5426-7796-9 (ISBN)
Note

Article in English and in Chinese.

Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-09-22Bibliographically approved
Liu-Helmersson, J. (2022). Sámi forced relocation in Sweden during 1920s-30s: history and narratives. In: Journal of Arctic studies: V (pp. 199-216). Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center, 5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sámi forced relocation in Sweden during 1920s-30s: history and narratives
2022 (English)In: Journal of Arctic studies: V, Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center , 2022, Vol. 5, p. 199-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Sámi Indigenous population live in the arctic Sápmi area across four countries: Norway,Sweden,Finland and the Kola Peninsulaof Russia. Reindeer husbandry is part of their profession and livelihood for millennia, where reindeers graze in Sápmi land without borders from mountains to the seashore at different seasons. Over the last one century,due to political  development between Sápmi countries,the country borders were closed forr eindeer grazing. Between 1920s and 1930s about 300-400 Sámi people were forced to relocate from northern to southern counties of Sápmi in Sweden. The study aims to introduce the history and consequences of the forced relocation to some of the affected Sámi people based on available information that the author can find, mainly the work of Prof. Patrik Lantto and Author Elin Anna Labba. The study shows that the forced relocations have had and still have an effect on reindeer husbandry in Sweden today. Through narratives of some relocated North Sámi,the stories are told on impact of the forced relocation to those relocatedreindeer herders’ lives. Through analysis of state policies and an example ofone reindeer herding district,Vapsten, one negative consequence of the forced relocation is described as strong intro-Sámi conflicts that are still unresolved even today.

Abstract [zh]

萨米人生活在北极地区的萨米原住民居住地,主要分布在四个国家境内,分别是挪威、瑞典、芬兰以及俄罗斯的科拉半岛。驯鹿饲养是萨米人千百年来的主要职业及主要生活来源,他们在没有国界的萨米土地上放牧,从山地到海边,随着季节更换放牧的地方。在过去的100 年间,由于萨米地区各个国家的政治发展,曾经用来放牧驯鹿的各个国家的边界地区先后关闭。在20 世纪20 到30年代之间,大约有300 到400 名萨米人被迫从瑞典北部的萨米居住地搬迁到南部的萨米居住地。本研究主要以帕特里克·兰托教授和艾琳·安娜·拉巴博士的著作为基础,研究的目的在于介绍萨米人遭遇强制搬迁的历史及其给部分萨米人带来的影响。研究表明,强制搬迁对瑞典的驯鹿饲养产生了影响,并且该影响一直延续到今天。有关搬迁后部分北方萨米人的叙事,讲述了强制搬迁对搬迁后驯鹿牧民生活的影响。通过分析国家政策,并以瓦普斯顿(Vapsten)驯鹿放牧区为例,发现强制搬迁的一个负面影响就是,到目前为止由搬迁而导致萨米人内部的冲突依然没有解 决。

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liaocheng: The Arctic Studies Center, 2022
Series
Journal of Arctic studies ; 5
Keywords
Sámi, Arctic Indigenous People, reindeer husbandry, forced relocations, Sámi history, Swedish Sámi policy, 萨米人 北极原住民 驯鹿饲养 强制搬迁 萨米历 史 瑞典萨米政策
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-214644 (URN)978-7-5426-7796-9 (ISBN)
Note

Chapter in Chinese.

Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-09-22Bibliographically approved
Liu-Helmersson, J., Nilsson, L. M. & Stoor, K. (2022). 瓦尔多的原住民研究—瑞典于默奥大学萨米族人研究中心: [Indigenous Research at Várdduo: Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden]. Journal of Arctic Studies, 2, 341-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>瓦尔多的原住民研究—瑞典于默奥大学萨米族人研究中心: [Indigenous Research at Várdduo: Centre for Sami research, Umeå University, Sweden]
2022 (Chinese)In: Journal of Arctic Studies, Vol. 2, p. 341-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Várdduo – The Centre for Sami Research was established in the year 2000 under the Faculty of Arts. Umeå University has expanded its Indigenous research area, from Sami languages ​​and culture at the beginning (1975), to four areas today: Education and Language, Health and Living Conditions, Land and Water, Culture and History. This essay introduces the development of indigenous-related research at Umeå University with a focus on the research from Várdduo in the past 20 years. Today Várdduo serves as a hub for active expansion of research related to Indigenous issues at Umeå university to local, national and international arenas. Indigenous research at Umeå University/Várdduo, although still mainly on Sámi issues, has experienced a development characterized by fast growth, diversity, interdisciplinarity and increasing international commitment

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Liaocheng, Shandong Province, China: The Arctic Studies Center (ASC), 2022
Keywords
Sámi research, Indigenous research, Sápmi
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-203728 (URN)
Note

Artikeln skickades in på engelska och översattes till kinesiska.

Available from: 2023-01-19 Created: 2023-01-19 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
Wang, Y., Zhang, X., Zhang, X., Liu-Helmersson, J., Zhang, L., Xiao, W., . . . Sang, S. (2021). Prognostic value of the extent of lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer-specific survival among T1 patients. BMC Cancer, 21(1), Article ID 403.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic value of the extent of lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer-specific survival among T1 patients
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2021 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Clinically, there are no clear guidelines on the extent of lymphadenectomy in patients with T1 esophageal cancer. Studying the minimum number of lymph nodes for resection may increase cancer-specific survival.

Methods: Patients who underwent esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy at T1 stage were selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (United States, 1998–2014). Maximally selected rank and Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine three variables: the number of lymph nodes examined, the number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio.

Results: Approximately 18% had lymph node metastases, where the median values were 10, 10 and 0 for the number of lymph nodes examined, the number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio, respectively. All three examined variables were statistically associated with cancer-specific survival probability. Dividing patients into two groups shows a clear difference in cancer-specific survival compared to four or five groups for all three variables: there was a 29% decrease in the risk of death with the number of lymph nodes examined ≥14 vs < 14 (hazard ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval: 0.57–0.89), a 35% decrease in the risk of death with the number of negative lymph nodes ≥13 vs < 13 (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.52–0.81), and an increase of 1.21 times in the risk of death (hazard ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.76–2.77) for the lymph node ratio > 0.05 vs ≤ 0.05.

Conclusions: The extent of lymph node dissection is associated with cancer-specific survival, and the minimum number of lymph nodes that need to be removed is 14. The number of negative lymph nodes and the lymph node ratio also have prognostic value after lymphadenectomy among T1 stage patients.

Keywords
Cancer-specific survival, Cutoff value, Esophageal cancer, Extent of lymphadenectomy, Prognosis, T1
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-182757 (URN)10.1186/s12885-021-08080-4 (DOI)000640498200002 ()33853577 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85104388002 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-24 Created: 2021-05-24 Last updated: 2023-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, L., Anne, O. & Liu-Helmersson, J. (2021). Sámi Traditional Healing in Sweden: An Interview Study. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 98(5 & 6), 813-823
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sámi Traditional Healing in Sweden: An Interview Study
2021 (English)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 98, no 5 & 6, p. 813-823Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sámi traditional healing has been practiced in the Sápmi region of northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia for millennia. This study focuses on Sámi traditional healing in Sweden. Through interviews with five active healers and 11 key informants, we found that traditional healing is currently alive in Sweden but hidden. Healers treat health problems ranging from the physical to the spiritual, including mental issues and life’s difficult situations. Low-cost methods are used: spiritual healing with prayers and the laying on of hands, consultation, and herbal remedies. Healing takes place either face-to-face or over distance. Healers charge no money but accept small gifts. Being a healer is a calling. A general concern is voiced by informants about the diminishing number of healers in Sweden.

National Category
Other Humanities Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-190675 (URN)
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2021-12-23Bibliographically approved
Liu-Helmersson, J. & Anne, O. (2021). Sámi traditional medicine: practices, usage, benefit, accessibility and relation to conventional medicine, a scoping review study. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 80(1), Article ID 1924993.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sámi traditional medicine: practices, usage, benefit, accessibility and relation to conventional medicine, a scoping review study
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 80, no 1, article id 1924993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Sámi Indigenous populations, who live in the arctic Sápmi area across four countries–Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia–have practiced traditional medicine (TM) for millennia. However, today Sámi TM is unknown within the Swedish health care services (HCS). The aim of this study is to describe the nature and scope of research conducted on Sámi TM among the four Sápmi countries. This study covers peer-reviewed research published in the English language up to 8 April 2020. From 15 databases, 240 abstracts were identified, and 19 publications met the inclusion criteria for full review. Seventeen studies were conducted in Norway, one in Finland and one in Sweden, none in Russia. In northern Norway, Sámi TM is actively used by the local communities, and is claimed to be effective, but is not accessible within HCS. Holistic worldviews, including spirituality, prevail in Sámi TM from practitioners’ selection criteria to health care practices to illness responsibilities. An integration of Sámi TM into HCS is clearly the desire of local communities. Comparisons were made between Sámi TM and conventional medicine on worldviews, on perspectives towards each other, and on integration. More studies are needed in Sweden, Finland and Russia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2021
Keywords
arctic indigenous people, integration, medical pluralism, spirituality, Sámi, traditional healing, worldview
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186840 (URN)10.1080/22423982.2021.1924993 (DOI)000678360600001 ()2-s2.0-85112252350 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-26 Created: 2021-08-26 Last updated: 2021-08-26Bibliographically approved
Liu, Z., Tian, J., Wang, Y., Li, Y., Liu-Helmersson, J., Mishra, S., . . . Wang, W. (2021). The burden of hand, foot, and mouth disease among children under different vaccination scenarios in China: a dynamic modelling study. BMC Infectious Diseases, 21(1), Article ID 650.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The burden of hand, foot, and mouth disease among children under different vaccination scenarios in China: a dynamic modelling study
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2021 (English)In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common illness in young children. A monovalent vaccine has been developed in China protecting against enterovirus-71, bivalent vaccines preventing HFMD caused by two viruses are under development.

OBJECTIVE: To predict and compare the incidence of HFMD under different vaccination scenarios in China.

METHODS: We developed a compartmental model to capture enterovirus transmission and the natural history of HFMD in children aged 0-5, and calibrated to reported cases in the same age-group from 2015 to 2018. We compared the following vaccination scenarios: different combinations of monovalent and bivalent vaccine; a program of constant vaccination to that of pulse vaccination prior to seasonal outbreaks.

RESULTS: We estimate 1,982,819, 2,258,846, 1,948,522 and 2,398,566 cases from 2015 to 2018. Increased coverage of monovalent vaccine from 0 to 80% is predicted to decrease the cases by 797,262 (49.1%). Use of bivalent vaccine at an 80% coverage level would decrease the cases by 828,560. Use of a 2.0× pulse vaccination for the bivalent vaccine in addition to 80% coverage would reduce cases by over one million. The estimated R0 for HFMD in 2015-2018 was 1.08, 1.10, 1.35 and 1.17.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results point to the benefit of bivalent vaccine and using a pulse vaccination in specific months over routine vaccination. Other ways to control HFMD include isolation of patients in the early stage of dissemination, more frequent hand-washing and ventilation, and better treatment options for patients.

Keywords
Basic reproductive number, Hand, foot and mouth disease, Pulse vaccination, SEIR model, Vaccine
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186468 (URN)10.1186/s12879-021-06157-w (DOI)000672471800008 ()34225650 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85110955627 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-03 Created: 2021-08-03 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Sang, S., Liu, Q., Guo, X., Wu, D., Ke, C., Liu-Helmersson, J., . . . Wang, Y. (2021). The epidemiological characteristics of dengue in high-risk areas of China, 2013-2016. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 15(12), Article ID e0009970.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The epidemiological characteristics of dengue in high-risk areas of China, 2013-2016
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2021 (English)In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 15, no 12, article id e0009970Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Dengue has become a more serious human health concern in China, with increased incidence and expanded outbreak regions. The knowledge of the cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological characteristics and the evolutionary dynamics of dengue in high-risk areas of China is limited.

Methods: Records of dengue cases from 2013 to 2016 were obtained from the China Notifiable Disease Surveillance System. Full envelope gene sequences of dengue viruses detected from the high-risk areas of China were collected. Maximum Likelihood tree and haplotype network analyses were conducted to explore the phylogenetic relationship of viruses from high-risk areas of China.

Results: A total of 56,520 cases was reported in China from 2013 to 2016. During this time, Yunnan, Guangdong and Fujian provinces were the high-risk areas. Imported cases occurred almost year-round, and were mainly introduced from Southeast Asia. The first indigenous case usually occurred in June to August, and the last one occurred before December in Yunnan and Fujian provinces but in December in Guangdong Province. Seven genotypes of DENV 1-3 were detected in the high-risk areas, with DENV 1-I the main genotype and DENV 2-Cosmopolitan the secondary one. The Maximum Likelihood trees show that almost all the indigenous viruses separated into different clusters. DENV 1-I viruses were found to be clustered in Guangdong Province, but not in Fujian and Yunnan, from 2013 to 2015. The ancestors of the Guangdong viruses in the cluster in 2013 and 2014 were most closely related to strains from Thailand or Singapore, and the Guangdong virus in 2015 was most closely related to the Guangdong virus of 2014. Based on closest phylogenetic relationships, viruses from Myanmar possibly initiated further indigenous cases in Yunnan, those from Indonesia in Fujian, while viruses from Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia were predominant in Guangdong Province.

Conclusions: Dengue is still an imported disease in China, although some genotypes continued to circulate in successive years. Viral phylogenies based on the envelope gene suggested periodic introductions of dengue strains into China, primarily from Southeast Asia, with occasional sustained, multi-year transmission in some regions of China.

Author summary: Dengue is the most prevalent and rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease globally. Because of the multiple introductions, dengue outbreaks occurred in epidemic seasons in Southern China, supported by suitable weather conditions. Surveillance data from 2013 to 2016 in China showed that Guangdong, Yunnan and Fujian provinces were the high-risk areas, with dengue outbreaks occurring almost every year. However, knowledge has been lacking of the epidemiological characteristics and the evolution pattern of dengue virus in these high-risk areas. This study shows a variety of epidemiological characteristics and sources of imported cases among the high-risk areas in China, with likely origins primarily from countries in Southeast Asia. Seven genotypes of the DENV 1-3 variety co-circulated with DENV1-I, the main genotype, and DENV 2-Cosmopolitan, the secondary. Genetic relationships among viral strains suggest that the indigenous viruses in the high-risk areas arose from imported viruses and sometimes persisted between years into the next epidemic season, especially in Guangdong Province. Population movement has played a vital role in dengue epidemics in China. This information may be useful in dengue control, especially during epidemic seasons and in the development of an early warning system within the region, in collaboration with bordering countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2021
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-191608 (URN)10.1371/journal.pntd.0009970 (DOI)000732293300003 ()34928951 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122846420 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-20 Created: 2022-01-20 Last updated: 2022-01-24Bibliographically approved
Liu-Helmersson, J., Rocklöv, J., Sewe, M. & Brännström, Å. (2019). Climate change may enable Aedes aegypti infestation in major European cities by 2100. Environmental Research, 172, 693-699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change may enable Aedes aegypti infestation in major European cities by 2100
2019 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 172, p. 693-699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Climate change allows Aedes aegyptito infest new areas. Consequently, it enables the arboviruses the mosquito transmits - e.g., dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever – to emerge in previously uninfected areas. An example is the Portuguese island of Madeira during 2012–13.

Objective: We aim to understand how climate change will affect the future spread of this potent vector, as an aidin assessing the risk of disease outbreaks and effectively allocating resources for vector control.

Methods: We used an empirically-informed, process-based mathematical model to study the feasibility of Aedes aegypti infestation into continental Europe. Based on established global climate-change scenario data, we assess the potential of Aedes aegypti to establish in Europe over the 21st century by estimating the vector population growth rate for five climate models (GCM5).

Results: In a low carbon emission future (RCP2.6), we find minimal change to the current situation throughout the whole of the 21st century. In a high carbon future (RCP8.5), a large parts of southern Europe risks being invaded by Aedes aegypti.

Conclusion: Our results show that successfully enforcing the Paris Agreement by limiting global warming to below 2 °C significantly lowers the risk for infestation of Aedes aegypti and consequently of potential large-scale arboviral disease outbreaks in Europe within the 21st century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Aedes aegypti, Vector invasion, Europe, Climate change
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143763 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2019.02.026 (DOI)000468377500079 ()30884421 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062900727 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03917Swedish Research Council Formas, 2017-01300
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form with title "Climate change may enable Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infestation in major European cities by 2100"

Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
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