umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Johansson, Robert
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Breugom, A. J., Bastiaannet, E., Boelens, P. G., Van Eycken, E., Iversen, L. H., Martling, A., . . . van de Velde, C. J. (2018). Oncologic treatment strategies and relative survival of patients with stage I-III rectal cancer - A EURECCA international comparison between the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, England, Ireland, Spain, and Lithuania. European Journal of Surgical Oncology, 44(9), 1338-1343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oncologic treatment strategies and relative survival of patients with stage I-III rectal cancer - A EURECCA international comparison between the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, England, Ireland, Spain, and Lithuania
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1338-1343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The aim of this EURECCA international comparison is to compare oncologic treatment strategies and relative survival of patients with stage I-III rectal cancer between European countries.

Material and methods: Population-based national cohort data from the Netherlands (NL), Belgium (BE), Denmark (DK), Sweden (SE), England (ENG), Ireland (IE), Spain (ES), and single-centre data from Lithuania (LT) were obtained. All operated patients with (y)pTNM stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 were included. Oncologic treatment strategies and relative survival were calculated and compared between neighbouring countries.

Results: We included 57,120 patients. Treatment strategies differed between NL and BE (p < 0.001), DK and SE (p < 0.001), and ENG and IE (p < 0.001). More preoperative radiotherapy as single treatment before surgery was administered in NL compared with BE (59.7% vs. 13.1%), in SE compared with DK (55.1% vs. 10.4%), and in ENG compared with IE (15.2% vs. 9.6%). Less postoperative chemotherapy was given in NL (9.6% vs. 39.1%), in SE (7.9% vs. 14.1%), and in IE (12.6% vs. 18.5%) compared with their neighbouring country. In ES, 55.1% of patients received preoperative chemoradiation and 62.3% post-operative chemotherapy. There were no significant differences in relative survival between neighbouring countries.

Conclusion: Large differences in oncologic treatment strategies for patients with (y)pTNM I-III rectal cancer were observed across European countries. No clear relation between oncologic treatment strategies and relative survival was observed. Further research into selection criteria for specific treatments could eventually lead to individualised and optimal treatment for patients with non-metastasised rectal cancer. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Rectal cancer, International comparison, Population-based, Stage I-III, Surgery, Oncologic treatment
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152412 (URN)10.1016/j.ejso.2018.05.025 (DOI)000444356500010 ()29960770 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Vermeer, N. C. A., Claassen, Y. H. M., Derks, M. G. M., Iversen, L. H., van Eycken, E., Guren, M. G., . . . Bastiaannet, E. (2018). Treatment and Survival of Patients with Colon Cancer Aged 80 Years and Older: A EURECCA International Comparison. The Oncologist, 23(8), 982-990
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment and Survival of Patients with Colon Cancer Aged 80 Years and Older: A EURECCA International Comparison
Show others...
2018 (English)In: The Oncologist, ISSN 1083-7159, E-ISSN 1549-490X, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 982-990Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Colon cancer in older patients represents a major public health issue. As older patients are hardly included in clinical trials, the optimal treatment of these patients remains unclear. The present international EURECCA comparison explores possible associations between treatment and survival outcomes in elderly colon cancer patients.

Subjects, Materials, and Methods. National data from Belgium, Denmark, The Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden were obtained, as well as a multicenter surgery cohort from Germany. Patients aged 80 years and older, diagnosed with colon cancer between 2001 and 2010, were included. The study interval was divided into two periods: 2001–2006 and 2007–2010. The proportion of surgical treatment and chemotherapy within a country and its relation to relative survival were calculated for each time frame.

Results. Overall, 50,761 patients were included. At least 94% of patients with stage II and III colon cancer underwent surgical removal of the tumor. For stage II–IV, the proportion of chemotherapy after surgery was highest in Belgium and lowest in The Netherlands and Norway. For stage III, it varied from 24.8% in Belgium and 3.9% in Norway. For stage III, a better adjusted relative survival between 2007 and 2010 was observed in Sweden (adjusted relative excess risk [RER] 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54–0.76) and Norway (adjusted RER 0.81, 95% CI: 0.69–0.96) compared with Belgium.

Conclusion. There is substantial variation in the rate of treatment and survival between countries for patients with colon cancer aged 80 years or older. Despite higher prescription of adjuvant chemotherapy, poorer survival outcomes were observed in Belgium. No clear linear pattern between the proportion of chemotherapy and better adjusted relative survival was observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
aged 80 and over, colonic neoplasms, Europe, surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, survival
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151406 (URN)10.1634/theoncologist.2017-0551 (DOI)000441897500017 ()29567826 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Claassen, Y. H. M., Vermeer, N. C. A., Iversen, L. H., van Eycken, E., Guren, M. G., Mroczkowski, P., . . . Bastiaannet, E. (2018). Treatment and survival of rectal cancer patients over the age of 80 years: a EURECCA international comparison. British Journal of Cancer, 119(4), 517-522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment and survival of rectal cancer patients over the age of 80 years: a EURECCA international comparison
Show others...
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 119, no 4, p. 517-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment strategy for older rectal cancer patients remains unclear. The current study aimed to compare treatment and survival of rectal cancer patients aged 80+.

METHODS: Patients of >= 80 years diagnosed with rectal cancer between 2001 and 2010 were included. Population-based cohorts from Belgium (BE), Denmark (DK), the Netherlands (NL), Norway (NO) and Sweden (SE) were compared side by side for neighbouring countries on treatment strategy and 5-year relative survival (RS), adjusted for sex and age. Analyses were performed separately for stage I-III patients and stage IV patients.

RESULTS: Overall, 19 634 rectal cancer patients were included. For stage I-III patients, 5-year RS varied from 61.7% in BE to 72.3% in SE. Proportion of preoperative radiotherapy ranged between 7.9% in NO and 28.9% in SE. For stage IV patients, 5-year RS differed from 2.8% in NL to 5.6% in BE. Rate of patients undergoing surgery varied from 22.2% in DK to 40.8% in NO.

CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variation was observed in the 5-year relative survival between European countries for rectal cancer patients aged 80+, next to a wide variation in treatment, especially in the use of preoperative radiotherapy in stage I-III patients and in the rate of patients undergoing surgery in stage IV patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152271 (URN)10.1038/s41416-018-0215-6 (DOI)000444244700016 ()30057408 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Göhler, S., Da Silva Filho, M. I., Johansson, R., Enquist-Olsson, K., Henriksson, R., Hemminki, K., . . . Försti, A. (2017). Functional germline variants in driver genes of breast cancer. Cancer Causes and Control, 28(4), 259-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional germline variants in driver genes of breast cancer
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 259-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Germline mutations in tumour suppressor genes cause various cancers. These genes are also somatically mutated in sporadic tumours. We hypothesized that there may also be cancer-related germline variants in the genes commonly mutated in sporadic breast tumours. Methods After excluding the well-characterized breast cancer (BC) genes, we screened 15 novel genes consistently classified as BC driver genes in next-generation sequencing approaches for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Altogether 40 SNPs located in the core promoter, 5'- and 3'-UTR or which were nonsynonymous SNPs were genotyped in 782 Swedish incident BC cases and 1,559 matched controls. After statistical analyses, further evaluations related to functional prediction and signatures of selection were performed. Results TBX3 was associated with BC risk (rs2242442: OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.92, dominant model) and with less aggressive tumour characteristics. An association with BC survival and aggressive tumour characteristics was detected for the genes ATR (rs2227928: HR = 1.63; 95% CI 1.00-2.64, dominant model), RUNX1 (rs17227210: HR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.42-8.61, recessive model) and TTN (rs2303838: HR = 2.36; 95% CI 1.04-5.39; rs2042996: HR = 2.28; 95% CI 1.19-4.37, recessive model). According to the experimental ENCODE data all these SNPs themselves or SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with them (r (2) ae<yen> 0.80) were located in regulatory regions. RUNX1 and TTN showed also several signatures of positive selection. Conclusion The study gave evidence that germline variants in BC driver genes may have impact on BC risk and/or survival. Future studies could discover further germline variants in known or so far unknown driver genes which contribute to cancer development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2017
Keywords
Breast cancer, Driver genes, Germline variants, Case-control study, Single nucleotide polymorphism
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134217 (URN)10.1007/s10552-017-0849-3 (DOI)000398480200001 ()28238063 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jörgren, F., Johansson, R., Arnadottir, H. & Lindmark, G. (2017). The importance of rectal washout for the oncological outcome after Hartmann's procedure for rectal cancer: analysis of population-based data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Techniques in Coloproctology, 21(5), 373-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of rectal washout for the oncological outcome after Hartmann's procedure for rectal cancer: analysis of population-based data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry
2017 (English)In: Techniques in Coloproctology, ISSN 1123-6337, E-ISSN 1128-045X, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 373-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During rectal cancer surgery the bowel may contain viable, exfoliated cancer cells, a potential source for local recurrence (LR). The amount and viability of these cells can be reduced using intraoperative rectal washout, a procedure that reduces the LR risk after anterior resection. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of washout on oncological outcome when performed in Hartmann's procedure (HP) for rectal cancer. A national cohort study on data for patients registered from 1995 to 2007 in the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry was carried out. The final analysis included patients belonging to TNM stages I-III who had undergone R0 HP with a registered 5-year follow-up. Multivariate analysis was performed. A total of 1188 patients were analysed (686 washout and 502 no washout). No differences were detected between the washout group and the no washout group concerning rates of LR [7% (49/686) vs. 10% (49/502); p = 0.13], distant metastasis (DM) [17% (119/686) vs. 18% (93/502); p = 0.65], and overall recurrence (OAR) [21% (145/686) vs. 24% (120/502); p = 0.29]. For both groups, the 5-year cancer-specific survival was below 50%. In multivariate analysis, washout neither decreased the risk of LR, DM, or OAR nor increased overall or the cancer-specific 5-year survival. The oncological outcome did not improve when washout was performed in HP for rectal cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Rectal cancer, Rectal washout, Hartmann's procedure, Recurrence, Survival
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Surgery Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137654 (URN)10.1007/s10151-017-1637-5 (DOI)000403535800006 ()28560479 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-18 Created: 2017-07-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lubin, J. H., Adams, M. J., Shore, R., Holmberg, E., Schneider, A. B., Hawkins, M. M., . . . Veiga, L. H. S. (2017). Thyroid Cancer Following Childhood Low-Dose Radiation Exposure: A Pooled Analysis of Nine Cohorts. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 102(7), 2575-2583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thyroid Cancer Following Childhood Low-Dose Radiation Exposure: A Pooled Analysis of Nine Cohorts
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 2575-2583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: The increased use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that involve radiation raises concerns about radiation effects, particularly in children and the radiosensitive thyroid gland.

Objectives: Evaluation of relative risk (RR) trends for thyroid radiation doses <0.2 gray (Gy); evidence of a threshold dose; and possible modifiers of the dose-response, e.g., sex, age at exposure, time since exposure.

Design and Setting: Pooled data from nine cohort studies of childhood external radiation exposure and thyroid cancer with individualized dose estimates, ≥1000 irradiated subjects or ≥10 thyroid cancer cases, with data limited to individuals receiving doses <0.2 Gy.

Participants: Cohorts included the following: childhood cancer survivors (n = 2); children treated for benign diseases (n = 6); and children who survived the atomic bombings in Japan (n = 1). There were 252 cases and 2,588,559 person-years in irradiated individuals and 142 cases and 1,865,957 person-years in nonirradiated individuals.

Intervention: There were no interventions.

Main Outcome Measure: Incident thyroid cancers.

Results: For both <0.2 and <0.1 Gy, RRs increased with thyroid dose (P < 0.01), without significant departure from linearity (P = 0.77 and P = 0.66, respectively). Estimates of threshold dose ranged from 0.0 to 0.03 Gy, with an upper 95% confidence bound of 0.04 Gy. The increasing dose–response trend persisted >45 years after exposure, was greater at younger age at exposure and younger attained age, and was similar by sex and number of treatments.

Conclusions: Our analyses reaffirmed linearity of the dose response as the most plausible relationship for “as low as reasonably achievable” assessments for pediatric low-dose radiation-associated thyroid cancer risk.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138041 (URN)10.1210/jc.2016-3529 (DOI)000405621600055 ()
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Göhler, S., Da Silva Filho, M. I., Johansson, R., Enquist-Olsson, K., Henriksson, R., Hemminki, K., . . . Försti, A. (2016). Impact of functional germline variants and a deletion polymorphism in APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B on breast cancer risk and survival in a Swedish study population. Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 142(1), 273-276
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of functional germline variants and a deletion polymorphism in APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B on breast cancer risk and survival in a Swedish study population
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 142, no 1, p. 273-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The C -> T mutation signature caused by APOBEC family members contributes to the development of breast cancer (BC). Also overexpression of APOBEC3B and a similar to 29. 5-kb deletion polymorphism between APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B have been associated with increased BC risk. Methods: We investigated in a population-based study, with 782 Swedish BC cases and 1559 controls, associations between potentially functional germline variants in APOBEC3A or APOBEC3B gene and BC risk and survival. Additionally, we identified deletion polymorphism carriers and explored possible associations with BC. Results: No evidence of association between any germline variant, including the deletion polymorphism, and BC risk or survival was observed. Only APOBEC3A promoter polymorphism rs5757402 was associated with low stage (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI 0.50-0.96, dominant model). Conclusion: The reported association between the deletion polymorphism and BC risk was not confirmed in the Swedish population, nor did any genotyped germline variant show any association with BC risk or survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Breast cancer, APOBEC3, Germline variants, Single-nucleotide polymorphism, Deletion polymorphism
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118269 (URN)10.1007/s00432-015-2038-7 (DOI)000370172900028 ()26320772 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Veiga, L. H. S., Holmberg, E., Anderson, H., Pottern, L., Sadetzki, S., Adams, M. J., . . . Lubin, J. H. (2016). Thyroid Cancer after Childhood Exposure to External Radiation: An Updated Pooled Analysis of 12 Studies. Radiation Research, 185(5), 473-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thyroid Cancer after Childhood Exposure to External Radiation: An Updated Pooled Analysis of 12 Studies
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Radiation Research, ISSN 0033-7587, E-ISSN 1938-5404, Vol. 185, no 5, p. 473-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have causally linked external thyroid radiation exposure in childhood with thyroid cancer. In 1995, investigators conducted relative risk analyses of pooled data from seven epidemiologic studies. Doses were mostly <10 Gy, although childhood cancer therapies can result in thyroid doses >50 Gy. We pooled data from 12 studies of thyroid cancer patients who were exposed to radiation in childhood (ages <20 years), more than doubling the data, including 1,070 (927 exposed) thyroid cancers and 5.3 million (3.4 million exposed) person-years. Relative risks increased supralinearly through 2-4 Gy, leveled off between 10-30 Gy and declined thereafter, remaining significantly elevated above 50 Gy. There was a significant relative risk trend for doses <0.10 Gy (P < 0.01), with no departure from linearity (P = 0.36). We observed radiogenic effects for both papillary and nonpapillary tumors. Estimates of excess relative risk per Gy (ERR/Gy) were homogeneous by sex (P = 0.35) and number of radiation treatments (P = 0.84) and increased with decreasing age at the time of exposure. The ERR/Gy estimate was significant within ten years of radiation exposure, 2.76 (95% CI, 0.94-4.98), based on 42 exposed cases, and remained elevated 50 years and more after exposure. Finally, exposure to chemotherapy was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, with results supporting a nonsynergistic (additive) association with radiation.

National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122578 (URN)10.1667/RR14213.1 (DOI)000376755000004 ()27128740 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stattin, P., Vickers, A. J., Sjoberg, D. D., Johansson, R., Granfors, T., Johansson, M., . . . Lilja, H. (2015). Improving the Specificity of Screening for Lethal Prostate Cancer Using Prostate-specific Antigen and a Panel of Kallikrein Markers: a Nested Case-Control Study. European Urology, 68(2), 207-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improving the Specificity of Screening for Lethal Prostate Cancer Using Prostate-specific Antigen and a Panel of Kallikrein Markers: a Nested Case-Control Study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A disadvantage of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for the early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) is that many men must be screened, biopsied, and diagnosed to prevent one death. Objective: To increase the specificity of screening for lethal PCa at an early stage. Design, setting, and participants: We conducted a case-control study nested within a population-based cohort. PSA and three additional kallikreins were measured in cryopreserved blood from a population-based cohort in Vasterbotten, Sweden. Of 40 379 men providing blood at ages 40, 50, and 60 yr from 1986 to 2009, 12 542 men were followed for > 15 yr. From this cohort, the Swedish Cancer Registry identified 1423 incident PCa cases, 235 with distant metastasis. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Risk of distant metastasis for different PSA levels and a prespecified statistical model based on the four kallikrein markers. Results and limitations: Mostmetastatic cases occurred in men with PSA in the top quartile at age 50 yr (69%) or 60 yr (74%), whereas 20-yr risk of metastasis for men with PSA below median was low (<= 0.6%). Among men with PSA > 2 ng/ml, a prespecified model based on four kallikrein markers significantly enhanced the prediction of metastasis compared with PSA alone. About half of all men with PSA > 2 ng/ml were defined as low risk by this model and had a <= 1% 15-yr risk of metastasis. Conclusions: Screening at ages 50-60 yr should focus on men with PSA in the top quartile. A marker panel can aid biopsy decision making. Patient summary: For men in their fifties, screening should focus on those in the top 10% to 25% of PSA values because the majority of subsequent cases of distant metastasis are found among these men. Testing of four kallikrein markers in men with an elevated PSA could aid biopsy decision making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Prostate cancer, Cancer metastasis, Prostate-specific antigen, Kallikrein-related peptidases, Prostate opsy
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109383 (URN)10.1016/j.eururo.2015.01.009 (DOI)000360571400017 ()25682340 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-25 Created: 2015-09-25 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Thomsen, H., da Silva Filho, M. I., Woltmann, A., Johansson, R., Eyfjord, J. E., Hamann, U., . . . Foersti, A. (2015). Inbreeding and homozygosity in breast cancer survival. Scientific Reports, 5, Article ID 16467.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inbreeding and homozygosity in breast cancer survival
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) help to understand the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. We performed multiple analyses on data from a previously conducted GWAS for the influence of individual SNPs, runs of homozygosity (ROHs) and inbreeding on BC survival. (I.) The association of individual SNPs indicated no differences in the proportions of homozygous individuals among short-time survivors (STSs) and long-time survivors (LTSs). (II.) The analysis revealed differences among the populations for the number of ROHs per person and the total and average length of ROHs per person and among LTSs and STSs for the number of ROHs per person. (III.) Common ROHs at particular genomic positions were nominally more frequent among LTSs than in STSs. Common ROHs showed significant evidence for natural selection (iHS, Tajima's D, Fay-Wu's H). Most regions could be linked to genes related to BC progression or treatment. (IV.) Results were supported by a higher level of inbreeding among LTSs. Our results showed that an increased level of homozygosity may result in a preference of individuals during BC treatment. Although common ROHs were short, variants within ROHs might favor survival of BC and may function in a recessive manner.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112244 (URN)10.1038/srep16467 (DOI)000364455700001 ()26558712 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-10 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications